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  1. #1
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    Low rolling resistance tires, which would be best for clydes

    I was wondering what would be the better low rolling resistant tires around for us clydes?

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    What size? On what kind of bike?

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    Senior Member digibud's Avatar
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    One of the best tires out there for road bikes is the Continental 4000s. It has low rolling resistance, a very good feel and extremely high scores for grip when wet. It has decent puncture protection and in the 25c size, is a really great all-around tire capable of being used for amateur racing or daily training. There are much lighter tires out there better suited to lightweight pro racers but the conti 4000s is hard to beat for a clyde or even an average rider. If you are more concerned about puncture protection, moving up to Gatorskins or even HardShells, will give you more protection at the cost of some road feel and grip in wet conditions. I'd say that if your roads are reasonably clean go with some 4000s tires. If you ride on nasty stuff, try some Gatorskins.

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    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    For value and durability I like Panaracer Pasela Tourguards.
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  5. #5
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    The tires would be for 700c, 26" and 20". They would be going on my 3 bikes all would be street and usually fairly clean.

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    Depends on type of bike, what type of riding you will be doing, whats important to you and your current weight.

    Case in point, I started riding at 365 pounds with the brand that came with the bikes. They didnt last long. A lot of punctures.... due to my weight and how thin walled the tires are. This was first an issue with my commuter and then my longer distance road bike. Switched the gatorskins and loved them for a bit but they can wear out very fast. Of course this depends on how many miles you ride and the type of riding you do and your current weight.

    Now I ride with matharon supremes because I value puncture proof and bomb proof over the very little rolling resistance they may have.
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    I should have put it in my last post but didn't think of it until this morning: 310 having lost 42 lbs now.
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  8. #8
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanWho View Post
    I was wondering what would be the better low rolling resistant tires around for us clydes?
    You really need to list sizes. I would recommend one tire in a 700x32, another in a 700x25.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by c_m_shooter View Post
    For value and durability I like Panaracer Pasela Tourguards.
    The tourguard with wire is a great value. Usually in the low $20 range. The first one I bought was a 28mm in the standard tire (not tourguards) it was $14 but you could tell quality control suffered in getting the price down that low. I put 3000 miles on a set of 35mm Tourguards that has a lot of life left in the rear and the front hardly looks ridden on. The vast majority of these miles is on course oil and chip roads. Not much wet riding with these but didn't notice any issues when I did.

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    How about the Michelin Pilot Sport 700x35 but I am only 220 they ride nice and so far no flats.....

  11. #11
    Carpe Velo Yo Spiff's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c_m_shooter View Post
    For value and durability I like Panaracer Pasela Tourguards.
    +1
    I have Paselas on two of my bikes and also upgraded my wife's new bike to them. They are available in almost every size, affordable and have a nice ride quality.
    2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '88 Trek 900, '92 Trek T100, 2000 Rans Tailwind

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    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    700x23c road racing slicks or 700x22 tubulars

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    OP riding a hybrid? Trek 7100 and 990

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    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanWho View Post
    I was wondering what would be the better low rolling resistant tires around for us clydes?
    Vittoria Randonneur Hyper, AKA Voyager Hyper in 700x38, 700x35, 700x32: Tough enough for long distance touring, fast enough for group rides

    Grand Bois Cypres, 700x30 (these run large, 700x32): True race tire performance in a larger size

    Challenge Parigi-Roubaix in 700x27 (these run large, 700x29): True race tire performance in a larger size

    The Hyper has flat protection, the other two don't.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
    700x23c road racing slicks or 700x22 tubulars
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanWho View Post
    The tires would be for 700c, 26" and 20". They would be going on my 3 bikes all would be street and usually fairly clean.
    I have Michelin Pro Endurance 700x25c on my Road bike, Michelin CX 32's (knobbies) on my Single Speed with 700c wheels, and Michelin Wild Run'r 1/4" slicks on my 26" commuter. The Michelin slicks are super-fast rolling, and the Wild Run'rs have proven to be durable and puncture resistance (hope I didn't just jinx myself),with a max inflation of 87 PSI. I don't have too many rides on the Pro Endurance tires (maybe 100 miles on them), but they roll exceptionally fast and feel better (more comfy) than the 23c Gatorskins on the wife's hybird, even at 110/100. YMMV.
    "I had this baby hand made in Tuscany, from titanium blessed by the pope. It weighs less than a fart, and costs more than a divorce..."

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    To really lower the rolling resistance I find eating less works for me.

  18. #18
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    Schwalbe Big Apples if they fit. No kidding, they're awesome and comfortable in a way you only fully realize after riding them.
    Be watchful, stand firm in the faith, act like men, be strong. Let all that you do be done in love.

  19. #19
    Senior Member corwin1968's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barrettscv View Post
    Vittoria Randonneur Hyper, AKA Voyager Hyper in 700x38, 700x35, 700x32: Tough enough for long distance touring, fast enough for group rides

    Grand Bois Cypres, 700x30 (these run large, 700x32): True race tire performance in a larger size
    I second the Vittoria recommendation. Really nice riding tires.

    The Grand Bois have a fantastic reputation for ride quality but the quality control seems spotty. Lots of issues with bulging sidewalls and split casings.
    Currently riding a 1983 Takara Highlander converted to a single-speed.

  20. #20
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanWho View Post
    I was wondering what would be the better low rolling resistant tires around for us clydes?
    Tire tread design (assuming that the tire tread is chosen for the terrain ridden on) is not as important , for a clyde, as tire pressure. I find that keeping your tires pumped fairly hard cuts the rolling resistance a bunch!!
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  21. #21
    Commuter & cyclotourist brianogilvie's Avatar
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    I like the Panaracer Paselas in 35-622. I have the non-TourGuard version, and I've had only one flat in over 2000 miles - and that had nothing to do with the tire; the rim tape had worked its way off of a spoke hole in my Synergy O/C rear rim (offset, to reduce dishing), and the sharp edge punctured the tube.

    Depends on where you ride, though. I have Marathons on my Bike Friday folder, and I got a flat in Paris after a nasty shard of glass worked its way through the protective layer.
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  22. #22
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    Too bad someone hasn't done a study of all the tires available in the different sizes and done actual testing to see which is the better ones. Right now I have Kenda Kwests on both of the treks 26x1.5 and 700cx1.5 and pumped to 105/95. They seem to do a decent job but I seem to remember from the long ago hazy days of my youth that there has to be better than these, but then I was 120 lbs lighter then too.
    No bike does everything perfectly. In fact, no bike does anything until SOMEONE gets on it and rides.

  23. #23
    Senior Member digibud's Avatar
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    one study

    look for the article titled

    Wide High-Performance Clincher Tires by Jan Heine and Mark Vande Kamp

    it has test results for several popular tires

  24. #24
    Senior Member Medic Zero's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefisaac View Post
    Depends on type of bike, what type of riding you will be doing, whats important to you and your current weight.

    Case in point, I started riding at 365 pounds with the brand that came with the bikes. They didnt last long. A lot of punctures.... due to my weight and how thin walled the tires are. This was first an issue with my commuter and then my longer distance road bike. Switched the gatorskins and loved them for a bit but they can wear out very fast. Of course this depends on how many miles you ride and the type of riding you do and your current weight.

    Now I ride with matharon supremes because I value puncture proof and bomb proof over the very little rolling resistance they may have.
    That was my experience as well. Loved the Gatorskins at first because the puncture resistance was great and they seemed faster. After about 6 months and about a 1000 miles they started getting flats all the time. When I got the first flat I sat down on the side of the road to try and find what punctured my tube and ended up picking about 40 small triangular rock shards and bits of glass out of the tire. After that they started getting flats pretty much every day, sometimes two or three times a day so I retired them. One of the other downsides of them for me was that I couldn't hop up onto a curb without getting a pinch flat. Something I very rarely do, but I like the option when I get squeezed out by traffic. A bear to mount and dismount as well. I was sure I was going to snap a plastic lever and was glad I carry one steel cored tire lever with me as well. Still a brutal struggle to mount mine. To be fair, I run wide, box-section, double walled rims, which had to have contributed to how hard they were for me to mount. 26 x 1 & an 8th"

    FWIW what I ride:

    Panaracer T-Serv Pro-Tex, roughly 26 x 1.5". These are listed as 1.75" but they run small. I like these for a front tire for my commuter as they are supple and have a little give, which is nice on the rough roads I travel on. Very good puncture resistance, just retired one after about 2,000 miles, which is fair given the softer compound, my size (280 pounds), the fact I often have a load on the front rack, and as rough as the roads I travel over are. IIRC, these are listed as being 75 PSI tires, I run them about that, but am toying with the idea of lowering them a little bit and seeing if the ride is even better without sacrificing rolling resistance.

    Vittoria Randonneur Pro's, 26 x 1.5". This is my go-to tire. I run them fore and aft on my tourer and on the rear on my commuter. Stiffer sidewalls than the Panaracers which for me, means they deform less under the load that is me and my saddlebag on my commuter, and front and rear panniers + camping gear on my tourer. Excellent puncture resistance, excellent durability. These are listed to 90 PSI, which is where I've been running them, but again, I'm toying with the idea of dropping these 10-15 PSI and seeing if they still roll well and are a little more cush over the endless series of bumps we call roads here.

    Schwalbe Marathon (plain Marathon, not Supreme, Dureme, or anything else). I picked up one of these when I foolishly had a brake pad go through the sidewall of a Vittoria and this was what my LBS had that was comparable. The Marathon lasted about 2,000 miles and had excellent puncture resistance. That tire may actually have more life in it, but it got 2 or 3 flats in a row and by that time I had a stockpile of Vittoria's built up from when I caught them on sale online, so I swapped it out. I did note a fair number of little gashes in its rubber at that point, which seems to be the end serviceable life with tires for me. Its rated to 100 PSI and that's where I ran it. The Marathon is a perfectly acceptable tire, but I found it to be a little heavy compared to the Vittoria's which give me at least as good of performance, and I find the Vittoria's to have better durability. FWIW, I'm usually plaqued with flats, and the plain Marathons had great puncture resistance for the first 2,000 miles. I think I only got 2-3 flats in that first 2,000 miles which is all I expect of any tire. At least one of those flats was a wire sliver. I wouldn't see any need to sacrifice ride for a more flat resistant model of Marathon, the plain ones were great. I ran this tire in my favored size; 26 x 1.5".

    IIRC, both the Vittoria's and the Marathons can be had with a reflective stripe.

    YMMV
    Last edited by Medic Zero; 06-02-13 at 08:52 AM.
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  25. #25
    Senior Member Big Pete 1982's Avatar
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    I just got a new set of Continental GP4000's in 700x23. I weigh about 245 lbs right now. I rode a group century with a ton of hill climbing yesterday on them and they were pretty sweet. Grippy and they soaked up a lot of road noise and vibrations compared to the Bontrager Race Lites I had on there before. I've ridden 23mm tires since I was 330 lbs and haven't had any issues with them. I'm sure the 25's probably ride smoother but my first bike had 23's so that's what I always went with.

    So basically what I'm saying is another big +1 for the Continental GP4000's. They're awesome!

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