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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-02-13, 01:00 PM   #1
Tel0004
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28 spoke rims, 700x23 tires at 270?

I'm looking to buy a road bike soon. My hybrid is a bit too small, and I would like to have more hand positions of a road bike.

I'm looking to spend 1500 max, and want tiegra or 105.

It seems like a lot of the road bikes at that range have 28 spoke rims, and 23c tires. Will those give me problems (I weight 270)? I would prefer 32 spoke, and 25-28c tires. Any bikes that come like this? I really don't want a cyclecross bike, and even if I bought a cyclecross bike, I would still have to end up replacing the tires for smooth road tires.

I'm trying to get an idea what my options are before I start hitting the stores this week to try a few bikes.
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Old 06-02-13, 03:38 PM   #2
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At your max budget, it might be hard to get those groupsets new 2013 at a LBS. Maybe catching a good sale or 2012 or 2011 overstocks. But you could get it from a bike direct at about half your max budget or used. I can't help any with the spokes I use 32h rims @ a little lighter weight and had some bad luck and tires I run 32mm hybrid.
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Old 06-02-13, 04:09 PM   #3
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You can get a new CAAD10/synapse with 105's for $1500
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Old 06-02-13, 04:23 PM   #4
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I weigh about 240-250 and run 700x25 tyres on a 32-spoke rear wheel and (I think) 28-spoke front wheel. I put a good 5000-odd miles on the wheels before a 35mph pothole incident cracked the rim on the back wheel, although that's the kind of thing where I don't think any number of spokes would have saved the wheel.

I took a bike with 700x23 tyres on Mavic Ksyrium Elite wheels, which have far fewer spokes, on a few rides totally about 40-50 miles I guess. The wheels didn't give me any issues.

If you're buying a new bike then as long as the tyres you want will fit I really wouldn't worry about the extra cost of replacing the tyres. Depending on where you buy it they may give you a discount on the replacement tyres in exchange for keeping the stock tyres.
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Old 06-02-13, 05:34 PM   #5
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My first road bike that I got when I was over 140kg/310lb came with 28 spokes front and back. Those wheels never gave me a problem in nearly 3 years of riding myself down to 120kg, never needing truing and they were a second hand set when I got them.

28 spokes will be fine as long as the wheel is well built. If it's a new bike you get, it might pay for you to get someone who knows their stuff to check and most likely increase the spoke tension in the wheels to cater for your weight.
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Old 06-02-13, 06:07 PM   #6
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I have just the bike. All City Space Horse. Retail around $1,500, full Tiagra, 32 spoke wheels, 700 x 35 mm tires. Perfect for a clyde. Can switch to narrower tires (28 ) when you lose weight. http://allcitycycles.com/bikes/space_horse

I was concerned about exactly the same thing last year. I wanted a road bike with drop bars and brifters, but low spoke wheels and super narrow tires kind of made me nervous. Bought a very similar Salsa Casseroll last year. No regrets. I am currently running it stock with 32 mm wide tires.

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Old 06-02-13, 06:13 PM   #7
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I wouldn't worry about 28-spoke wheels, provided they're well-built. You might ask your LBS to have their mechanic double-check the tension on every spoke with a tension meter before you take delivery of the bike. If the shop where you buy offers a complimentary tune-up after the first few hundred miles, ask them to check the spoke tension again at that time. That should help minimize the chance of having a problem.

I, personally, prefer 25mm tires to 23mm, but the difference between the two is small enough that I wouldn't throw a perfectly good set of 23s in the trash. Be aware that not all road bikes will be capable of running 700x28 tires. If you want to run 28s, you'll need to double-check that they'll fit. On my Cervelo RS, for example, there's not enough space between the tire and fork for anything larger than 700x25. On my previous bike, squeezing a 700x28 past the brake pads was always a very tight fit...
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Old 06-02-13, 06:28 PM   #8
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The Jamis Bossanova might also fit the bill. Also Tiagra level components, disk brakes, and 32 spoke wheels. http://www.myjamis.com/SSP%20Applica...cat_grp=road_9
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Old 06-03-13, 05:33 AM   #9
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Thanks for the replies. I think I'm going to test out a few bikes later this week. The bike I like the most on paper is the Domane 2.0, and its good that the 28 spoke wheels should work. If they don't, at least a new wheel for the rear isn't too expensive. I also like the relaxed geometry, and the wider tires, but I'll be sure to check out a few stores, and as many bikes as possible before I buy.
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Old 06-03-13, 05:46 AM   #10
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You'll be happier long-term with a bike that can take fatter tires regardless of weight. Unless you're racing, why go with a 23c? I'd make that sure that the bike can take a 28c or a 32c tire.
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Old 06-03-13, 06:41 AM   #11
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I weigh 230. I'd recently put a 23mm on the front of my hybrid to go along with my new lighter, hand built (Sun Rims M13II) wheels.
It was simply too harsh on rough textured pavement and I reinstalled my 26mm tires. The "road buzz" etc. made riding "less fun". They also feel a bit "safer" going over some diagonal running RR tracks I have to cross. Also they seem to be less "controlled" by the seam in the pavement where the concrete curb/apron meets the asphalt in the bike lanes.

At 280, you'd have to have the 23's pumped up rock hard.

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Old 06-03-13, 06:44 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bikemig View Post
You'll be happier long-term with a bike that can take fatter tires regardless of weight. Unless you're racing, why go with a 23c? I'd make that sure that the bike can take a 28c or a 32c tire.
Pretty much agree. Somewhat fatter tires and steel frame make for a more comfortable ride.
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Old 06-03-13, 11:12 AM   #13
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I weigh about 290lbs.

I am running 700x23mm with the stock 24 spoke alloy wheels (2013 Madone 4.5). After 835 miles in 7 weeks the bike is riding great. I run the tires at max of 120psi. Just this weekend I had the rear wheel trued as it had a slight wobble to it. Not enough to run the brake pads though.

My goals are speed and distance with little regard for comfort and so far this has been working for me.
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Old 06-03-13, 11:32 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Jason300 View Post
I weigh about 290lbs.

I am running 700x23mm with the stock 24 spoke alloy wheels (2013 Madone 4.5). After 835 miles in 7 weeks the bike is riding great. I run the tires at max of 120psi. Just this weekend I had the rear wheel trued as it had a slight wobble to it. Not enough to run the brake pads though.

My goals are speed and distance with little regard for comfort and so far this has been working for me.
I weigh 330lbs, have the same exact tire size/spoke count on my tarmac I bought last week. I've got about 40 miles on it and a quarter of that was on a road pretty torn up, Lots of bumps, cracks, etc. So far so good, But won't be shocked when I'll need my wheels trued or replaced. I run my tires at max of 120psi as well, and definitly something I'd recommend doing.
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Old 06-03-13, 11:58 AM   #15
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Surly Crosscheck, can be had for around $1100 or so, 32 spoke rims, Tiagra components, and comes with 700c x 32 tires. Seems like a great buy. REI often has it so if you don't like it you can return it.

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Old 06-03-13, 01:46 PM   #16
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I'm 255(yes i gained weight, shush) and i ride 28spokes on 23mm tires(would rather have 25's but have to wait till the 23's wear out). It depends on where I ride and how I ride but I do true up my wheel either once a month or once every 3. Mine are entry level wheels that came with the bike. I also have a tiagra 9speed and really have not came up or had a good reason for the cost of 105 and up. the new Tiagra is 10speed and a good mechanic can tune it right and it will stay great for a long time. I know the giant Defy will accept tires up to 28 but many road bikes can do 25's but beyond that it gets tight.

Only thing i notice a large person stock entry level wheels feel noodley when doing a standing sprint from a stop, got to try some mavics once and they were strong and stiff as all heck even with a lower poke count.
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