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  1. #1
    Senior Member JeePakXJ's Avatar
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    Building a super durable heavy hauler

    So im looking at building a bike mainly for durability for carrying heavy loads (f/r panniers, trailer and loaded 72hr pack) for going on biking trips. I dont care about weight or looks or "ooo thats some smooth shifting" i want stuff that will last many many thousands of miles with care.

    So far Im looking at a surly cross check frame with the LHT front fork, shimano deore xt m770 9sp cassette, shimano saint rear der, and campagnolo athena ergo shifters.

    I dont need a 3 chainring set, Id rather only have a single chainring but with my recent knee injury id feel more comfortable in the long run with having a double chainring like a 38/48 (i never leave the 48t on my road bike and hardly use the lowest ring on the cassette unless im going up the really big bridges over the intercoastal with a headwind).

    Any suggestions on stronger parts than ive listed and alost on parts i havent listed. Im still looking at what front chainring set, crank and front der that would be best.

    Oh and im 6'3" 257lb (but im still dropping weight! lol)
    24yrs old
    Trek 2200 Composite

  2. #2
    [IMG]http://i4.photobucke jeepseahawk's Avatar
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    In the touring section you will find a lot of information. For shifting they seem to like bar-end shifters for ease and longevity. Sounds like you will be not climbing much but I would still recommed a compact 50-34 due to all the weight, trailer, pannier etc.

    edit for bar-end shifters, not thumb shifters
    Last edited by jeepseahawk; 06-04-13 at 12:41 PM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    How much weight are you planning to carry? My Cross Check goes into a death wobble on downhills with too much weight on the rear. You are going to want a small chainring with a full touring load. I ride a fixed gear 46/15 on my daily rides, but use every gear on my Cross Check when touring loaded. From you description sounds like you be better off with a Long Haul trucker or Big Dummy.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
    May your mountains rise into and above the clouds. -Edward Abbey

  4. #4
    Has opinion, will express
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    Have you checked the compatibility of Campy shifters with Shimano derailleurs?

    Probably the most important aspect of a heavy-duty build will be the wheels. Stainless spokes, good-quality hubs, and rims that probably would suit either a long-distance heavy-duty tourist or a touring tandem. In 700C form, the Mavic A719 that we use for touring and tandeming, comes to mind, along with Velocity Dyad. Getting someone who knows how to build wheels to do the job also is a must.

    Otherwise, mountainbike components are probably your best bet for the drivetrain. The lower level Shimano cranksets have steel chainrings which I consider to be more durable than the aluminium ones; this is probably most important for the chainring you use the most.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  5. #5
    Watching and waiting. jethro56's Avatar
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    I have a Cross Check built around a Sram Rival Cyclocross groupset. If I wanted a full touring bike I'd want something with a lower BB and a chainstay length in the 450mm range. I love my Cross Check but a fully loaded touring bike is not what it is. As far as cranks realize the paniers are going to push a lot more wind.

  6. #6
    Senior Member JeePakXJ's Avatar
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    Jeepseahawk, I took your advice and posted in touring! Lol it was a late night post last night and I didn't think to post it there since I'm a clyde.

    I'm planning on carrying anywhere from 50 to 200lbs of gear depending on when/where/how long I'll be biking for. Yea I can see how I overlooked how I'd need a smaller chainring because of all the weight. I had been looking between the cross and let for quite a while and I think for my body I'd be more comfortable with the geometry of the cross vs the lht.

    I haven't looked into campy shifters but I will look into them now. I did read that using a high spoke count rim for a tandem makes for a really strong rim setup for a tourer.
    24yrs old
    Trek 2200 Composite

  7. #7
    just pedal donalson's Avatar
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    why would you go with a cross check over a LHT?... the LHT is made to haul crap... even surly recommends it over the Cross check for that sort of thing... it comes with the LHT fork already as well...
    mtbr clyd moderator

  8. #8
    Senior Member JeePakXJ's Avatar
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    I am considering the cross check because it is also designed to carry a load with racks and panniers and it is built super tough for cyclocross racing.
    24yrs old
    Trek 2200 Composite

  9. #9
    Humvee of bikes =Worksman Nightshade's Avatar
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    Consider a Worksman Cycle for your project. It's a super heavy duty bike that can be dressed as you like it and delivered to your home.

    www.worksman.com
    My preferred bicycle brand is.......WORKSMAN CYCLES
    I dislike clipless pedals on any city bike since I feel they are unsafe.

    Originally Posted by krazygluon
    Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred, which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?

  10. #10
    Senior Member
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    I think at 200# you'll be overloading a LHT. You'd be in the Big Dummy territory. I think the Trucker would be maxed out at around 75#. Be careful about how much weight a bike can haul around.

    Mark Shuman

  11. #11
    just pedal donalson's Avatar
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    ya LHT recommends 300# max with rider/load combined... the cross check is lower as I recall
    mtbr clyd moderator

  12. #12
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    If you're hauling 200 lbs of crap over a bridge or overpass, you want a triple. You're never going to ride that bike 5 years and say "Golly, guess I didn't need that little ring after all." Instead, sometime, somewhere, when you least expect it, you're going to find yourself cranking up a grade into a headwind at 4 mph saying, "Glad I got that little ring!"
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

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