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  1. #1
    Senior Member Notgrownup's Avatar
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    Wondering if i bought the wrong bike...Hybrid VS Road..

    Maybe i am over reacting but i have had my Quick 5 for about a month and put about 100 miles and i really don't feel that comfortable on it, I bought some padded shorts yesterday to eliminate some of the butt pain but my hands go numb after3 miles and i have had to add a stem extender and angle adjustable stem...Yesterday while at the LBS, i took a Trek 1.1 off the rack and sat on it for a while and it was very comfortable...seems like there were more and better hand positions available...Now mind you i didn't take it out for a ride but i sat on it for about 15 minutes...Wondering if any of you have both bike styles and can give me some of your insight...Please... I am 6'1" 245 lbs ...
    BE THE PERSON YOUR DOG THINKS YOU ARE.....

  2. #2
    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
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    For sporty/fitness riding, a properly fitting road bike can usually be made more comfy than a similar hybrid. More hand positions and less weight on your butt.

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    Honestly, while its possible that a road bike would just suit you better, there is a lot that you can do to adjust various things to make the bike more comfortable. It all depends on the riding position you want and how you need to adjust the bike to make that riding position work for you (assuming the frame is vaguely the correct size of course).

    I just posted in a thread in the fitting your bike forum about the path I've followed in tweaking a whole bunch of settings on my bike to get it to a place where its comfortable for me to ride (so far up to ~9 miles in one day or ~7.5 mi in one ride).

    As far as I can tell, it usually can be done, but it takes some patience.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Notgrownup's Avatar
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    I just got back from a 10 mile ride...first time with the padded shorts, it helped...still a bit sore butt better than before...I sat on the bontrager seat selector yesterday and i was surprised to see how narrow the seat was that i was fitted for...like a race seat, about 2" narrower than my current one...Maybe i am putting too much preassure on my ischial bones...Looks like i need a 138MM Per the Bontrager sitting guide which is a 138MM...I will have to buy a seat it looks like...
    BE THE PERSON YOUR DOG THINKS YOU ARE.....

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    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
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    Believe it or not, the very wide "comfort" type seats are usually less comfortable in the long run.

  6. #6
    Senior Member MikeRides's Avatar
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    I was unsure of what I wanted at first too, so I tried out a couple road bikes with drop handlebars (test rides around the parking lot of my LBS FWIW (not that that would make a difference then just sitting on it)) and came to the realization I wanted something more comfortable since I was riding for recreation/fitness. To me, sitting upright is easier on the back then crouched over-plus it's harder [not impossible, though] to fly over the handlebars on a hybrid if you hit a bump the wrong way. I ended up test riding many different hybrids of which I found one I was the most comfortable in. My first couple long rides resulted in more pain than I was used to on a bike but I think that was mainly caused by myself riding in too high of a gear and not being properly hydrated.

    Most of the trails I ride on aren't finished or paved badly so the wider wheels on a hybrid is probably best, but for my road riding I figure when or if I ever get to my goal of 150 pounds(probably a few years from now), I will probably look into a flat bar road bike for the speed factor.
    Want to ride fast? Just ride with a slower group.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member MikeRides's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebel1916 View Post
    Believe it or not, the very wide "comfort" type seats are usually less comfortable in the long run.
    I couldn't agree more with this post. I had a large, soft gel seat on my old mountain bike that I had to take off due to a sore butt. Surprisingly the stock seat on my current hybrid is very comfortable for my 30-35 mile rides; my LBS was pissed off that they couldn't sell me a new seat when they asked if I wanted to change it out a month after purchase and I said "no, its just fine as-is."
    Want to ride fast? Just ride with a slower group.
    Want to feel like a kid again? Dust off that old bike hanging in your garage!

  8. #8
    Me and the cat... Pamestique's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebel1916 View Post
    Believe it or not, the very wide "comfort" type seats are usually less comfortable in the long run.
    especially for men! Also...I have been riding oh 100 years, things hurt. After some time on the bike my hands get numb, my private parts get irritated, my feet hurt, my neck get sore... its all part of cycling and what you need to do is 1) insure your bike is properly fitted and 2) learn to move and adjust your position on the bike to give your body a relief. Hands hurt, I change my position on the part... private parts hurt... I stand up and pedal for awhile or shift forward or back on the saddle. I stop and just take a 10 sec posture break... also use a chamois cream with the shorts - helps eliminate chafing.

    And all in all, just get on and stay on the bike - alot of the problems go away with time spent riding...
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  9. #9
    Just Keep Pedaling Beachgrad05's Avatar
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    Wondering if i bought the wrong bike...Hybrid VS Road..

    My LBS has a 30 day return policy if you aren't happy. They would take the one bike back and get you on different bike
    Move along....nothing to see here....anymore.

  10. #10
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beachgrad05 View Post
    My LBS has a 30 day return policy if you aren't happy. They would take the one bike back and get you on different bike
    Very generous, but not something you can expect from every bike shop.

  11. #11
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pamestique View Post
    especially for men! Also...I have been riding oh 100 years, things hurt. After some time on the bike my hands get numb, my private parts get irritated, my feet hurt, my neck get sore... its all part of cycling and what you need to do is 1) insure your bike is properly fitted and 2) learn to move and adjust your position on the bike to give your body a relief. Hands hurt, I change my position on the part... private parts hurt... I stand up and pedal for awhile or shift forward or back on the saddle. I stop and just take a 10 sec posture break... also use a chamois cream with the shorts - helps eliminate chafing.

    And all in all, just get on and stay on the bike - alot of the problems go away with time spent riding...
    It can be true for women as well. When we bought my wife's bike she opted for a big padded saddle, rode a few times over a few months and then her bike sat gathering dust. Eventually she admitted the reason she didn't ride was because her saddle wasn't comfortable so I fiddled with it until we concluded it was no good for her. Bought her a thinner saddle with just a little bit of padding and now she loves her bike.
    "For a list of ways technology has failed to improve quality of life, press three"

  12. #12
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeRides View Post
    I was unsure of what I wanted at first too, so I tried out a couple road bikes with drop handlebars (test rides around the parking lot of my LBS FWIW (not that that would make a difference then just sitting on it)) and came to the realization I wanted something more comfortable since I was riding for recreation/fitness. To me, sitting upright is easier on the back then crouched over-plus it's harder [not impossible, though] to fly over the handlebars on a hybrid if you hit a bump the wrong way. I ended up test riding many different hybrids of which I found one I was the most comfortable in. My first couple long rides resulted in more pain than I was used to on a bike but I think that was mainly caused by myself riding in too high of a gear and not being properly hydrated.

    Most of the trails I ride on aren't finished or paved badly so the wider wheels on a hybrid is probably best, but for my road riding I figure when or if I ever get to my goal of 150 pounds(probably a few years from now), I will probably look into a flat bar road bike for the speed factor.
    Really? Do you have anything that would back this up?

  13. #13
    Senior Member rebel1916's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    Really? Do you have anything that would back this up?
    I know, it's like physics in reverse. The higher your center of gravity (like sitting up on a hybrid, say) the more likely you are to go over the bars. You may feel more stable if you have a fat tire hybrid, but still the C of G is gonna be higher. And yes, I am aware that some set their flat bar bikes up with roadie like seat/bar drop, but it is relatively rare.

  14. #14
    Senior Member MattFoley's Avatar
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    I started out on a hybrid and it only took me a few months to regret the decision. Of course, by then it was too late to return the bike, and too soon to convince my wife to let me upgrade. The problem eventually became that I didn't want to ride my hybrid anymore because I wanted a road bike so bad. Happily, I now have three road bikes and plan to get at least one more (need an SS/FG)...I would not, however, even accept a hybrid as a gift....I really dislike the geometry and lack of hand positions.

    Given what you said, my guess is that you'll test ride a road bike and never want to ride your hybrid again.
    Cars man, whyyyyyy?!?!?!?!

  15. #15
    Senior Member MattFoley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebel1916 View Post
    I know, it's like physics in reverse. The higher your center of gravity (like sitting up on a hybrid, say) the more likely you are to go over the bars. You may feel more stable if you have a fat tire hybrid, but still the C of G is gonna be higher. And yes, I am aware that some set their flat bar bikes up with roadie like seat/bar drop, but it is relatively rare.
    My thoughts exactly.
    Cars man, whyyyyyy?!?!?!?!

  16. #16
    Just Keep Pedaling Beachgrad05's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
    Very generous, but not something you can expect from every bike shop.
    Of course...just noting the LBS I have bought my bikes at has such a policy.
    Move along....nothing to see here....anymore.

  17. #17
    Senior Member WonderMonkey's Avatar
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    I own a Quick 5 and after I used it for a while the numbness went away. My rump had to get in shape, hands used to this and that, and I'm good. Maybe your body won't and the Trek would do you better.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Notgrownup's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the differnet insights....
    BE THE PERSON YOUR DOG THINKS YOU ARE.....

  19. #19
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    Did you say you had a stem extender installed? I am assuming that is to raise the bars to put you in a more vertical position? What a lot of people don't realize is the more upright you sit, the more weight goes on your butt.....then a larger more padded seat is usually the "fix". The reality is that a road bike will distribute the weight more evenly between your hands, butt and feet. A smaller seat with padded shorts will prove much more comfortable.

  20. #20
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry66 View Post
    Did you say you had a stem extender installed? I am assuming that is to raise the bars to put you in a more vertical position? What a lot of people don't realize is the more upright you sit, the more weight goes on your butt.....then a larger more padded seat is usually the "fix". The reality is that a road bike will distribute the weight more evenly between your hands, butt and feet. A smaller seat with padded shorts will prove much more comfortable.
    Maybe we need to start at square one. What size bike did you buy?

  21. #21
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    Gloves and bar ends may help the hands some. Maybe a grip change would help also. I had a hybrid. Rode it for a few months. I found it lacking in several departments. Couldn't ride any of the rougher packed trails. Wasn't near as fast or comfortable as a road bike. It did need a saddle change as well. I traded it in on my current road bike.

    Having said that a hybrid can be made comfortable. The right saddle, adjusted right helps a lot. Bar ends or a mustache or touring bar may make all the difference in hand comfort. I'd strongly suggest looking at a touring bar.

    If you do have the 30 day grace period. I would strongly suggest looking at a road bike. I get from you're posts a feeling of buyer's remorse. Now is the time to do the checking. As to the Trek mentioned. I'd personally reccomend the 1.2 over the 1.1. You get better components, 2300 to Sora. And you most importantly pick up a carbon fork. The fork will be a blessing to you're sore hands. Believe me, that is one of the main reasons the Sirrus Sport had to go. It had an aluminum fork. It beat the tar out of my hands.

    If not then look into different bars and/or bar ends. It will give you more hand positions. Also gel insert padded gloves are a must. With these and a proper fitting saddle you may find the Quick a fine bike to ride. One last thought. You know that you do NOT have to inflate the tires to the max on the sidewalls. Try dropping the front pressure by 10 or 15 pounds and the rear 5 or 10. Then ride it and see how it feels. You are looking for a 15% sqish on the tires from no weight to you're weight on them. Example my road bike tire have a max of 140 on them. I'm running 105 and 115 right now. I've run as low as 95/105. But they star to roll too slow at those pressures. But it rode nice and soft for 23mm tires.

    Mark Shuman
    Last edited by phread59; 07-14-13 at 08:18 PM.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notgrownup View Post
    Thank you all for the differnet insights....
    We would be able to do a much better job of helping you to figure out how to eliminate your discomfort on your bike if you would take the time to answer some of the detailed questions we have posted here, and even better would be pictures of you on the bike in riding position.

    Like I said in the other thread I linked to in my post above, I was able to make my Escape RX 1 really comfortable by tweaking various settings, but we can't really help you if you don't give us more information.

  23. #23
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phread59 View Post
    Gloves and bar ends may help the hands some. Maybe a grip change would help also. I had a hybrid. Rode it for a few months. I found it lacking in several departments. Couldn't ride any of the rougher packed trails. Wasn't near as fast or comfortable as a road bike. It did need a saddle change as well. I traded it in on my current road bike.

    Having said that a hybrid can be made comfortable. The right saddle, adjusted right helps a lot. Bar ends or a mustache or touring bar may make all the difference in hand comfort. I'd strongly suggest looking at a touring bar.

    If you do have the 30 day grace period. I would strongly suggest looking at a road bike. I get from you're posts a feeling of buyer's remorse. Now is the time to do the checking. As to the Trek mentioned. I'd personally reccomend the 1.2 over the 1.1. You get better components, 2300 to Sora. And you most importantly pick up a carbon fork. The fork will be a blessing to you're sore hands. Believe me, that is one of the main reasons the Sirrus Sport had to go. It had an aluminum fork. It beat the tar out of my hands.

    If not then look into different bars and/or bar ends. It will give you more hand positions. Also gel insert padded gloves are a must. With these and a proper fitting saddle you may find the Quick a fine bike to ride. One last thought. You know that you do NOT have to inflate the tires to the max on the sidewalls. Try dropping the front pressure by 10 or 15 pounds and the rear 5 or 10. Then ride it and see how it feels. You are looking for a 15% sqish on the tires from no weight to you're weight on them. Example my road bike tire have a max of 140 on them. I'm running 105 and 115 right now. I've run as low as 95/105. But they star to roll too slow at those pressures. But it rode nice and soft for 23mm tires.

    Mark Shuman
    The Quick 5 has an aluminum fork, though I doubt that could be causing the numbness after riding just 3 miles.

  24. #24
    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
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    I had a road bile and a hybrid - Trek 7.2Fx. I sold the Trek to a friend, and kind of regret doing it. The road bike is more fun, but the hybrid was more convenient for commuting.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

  25. #25
    just pedal donalson's Avatar
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    honestly 100 miles is just touching the surface of getting used to the pressure points and such...

    that isn't to say that you wouldn't be more comfy on a road bike... I'm riding a 29er MTB with narrower tires (32c at the moment) and a titec H bar that gives me enough hand position options... I've had the bar on several bikes and even rode a 100k with it... I want a drop bar road bike but the more I go out and explore the roads in my area the more I wonder if that is the way to go

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