Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Senior Member Fangowolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Houston
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT / Motobecane Fhantom CX 105 / Giant Cypress ST / EZ Sport AX / Trisled Touring Trike
    Posts
    408
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Nashbar Cyclocross

    Hopefully not the that's too many bikes
    I was about to get a Fantom CX when I got the 20% nashbar coupon, so I went 105's and steel. I think it might be a bit small for me, but looking where everyone else puts their seats I must be buying big.

    One.JPGtwo.JPGthree.JPGfour.JPGfive.JPGsix.JPG

    Okay now the question I think my back,gut and neck can get used to drops eventually, but the junk is putting a 2 sec limit on the drops. How are you guys getting around that? I'm thinking I might need a cup or a noseless saddle.

  2. #2
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,473
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I built one of those for my buddy last year. They have changed a few things, last year they were green and had a carbon fork...cant tell if yours is carbon and painted or steel...his was black.

    The components were great...the wheels sucked. We worked on them for a while to get them true enough to ride.

    As far as the seat, you need to do a few things....one go on youtube and search for arts cyclery basic fit videos they have several of them and show pretty well how to set up your seat and bars. They are well done actually (even have decent component tuning videos if you want to do that)

    Get that seat level, and rotate your upper body forward while rotating your hips back, and keep those sit bones on the seat, not other areas of your body. its a learned skill to get in that position, but once it clicks its easy.

    from there if you want to rotate your seat down in front a degree or two, thats fine, but dont get too much down, as your just going to throw yourself forward on the bars.

    I ride mine about one degree down or level these days. Also if your mainly street, change those tires that came on it...and hope your not in a hilly area, seems his came with a 25 rear cassette and a cross crank...sucks for major climbs.
    There's indecision when you aint got nothin left

  3. #3
    Senior Member Fangowolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Houston
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT / Motobecane Fhantom CX 105 / Giant Cypress ST / EZ Sport AX / Trisled Touring Trike
    Posts
    408
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This one has 11-28T cassette, the fork says cromoly on the specs, when I thump it I don't get the steel sound I get from the frame, but I don't think its carbon. I almost preordered a new back wheel, then started worrying that the rear specs did not list the spacing. Yea I'll be getting some road tires.

    I'm hoping it just inexperience stopping the drops, but its probably my bad back, things don't rotate back there

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,085
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Fangowolf View Post
    Okay now the question I think my back,gut and neck can get used to drops eventually, but the junk is putting a 2 sec limit on the drops. How are you guys getting around that?
    Wear lycra bibs or bike shorts. Make sure that "the junk" is pulled up so that it's out of the way. Also make sure your saddle is positioned properly. You should start out with it level. Tilt up if you're sliding toward the bars, tilt down if you're getting poked in places you don't want to be poked. Most modern saddles are fairly long and you want to sit toward the back of the saddle. Sitting on the nose (a.k.a. "on the rivet") will become painful quickly.

    I'm thinking I might need a cup or a noseless saddle.
    My ISM Adamo Road saddle is one of the most comfortable I've used. Unlike "regular" saddles, I can use any position I want, for as long as I want. More traditional saddles were always a bit of a compromise, for me. I could be super-comfortable with my hands on the tops of the hoods or in the drops, but the other position was never quite perfect.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,085
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Fangowolf View Post
    the fork says cromoly on the specs, when I thump it I don't get the steel sound I get from the frame, but I don't think its carbon.
    If a magnet will stick to it, the fork is steel. If there are no visible welds, it's carbon fiber. If the magnet won't stick and there are visible welds which look large and blobby, it's aluminum. The specs for my Nashbar touring frame said the fork was chromoly, but the one delivered with the bike was actually aluminum.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Fangowolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Houston
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT / Motobecane Fhantom CX 105 / Giant Cypress ST / EZ Sport AX / Trisled Touring Trike
    Posts
    408
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks ss I should have thought of that lol. I have plenty of magnets for my cadence sensor . I'll post back after the test.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Fangowolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Houston
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT / Motobecane Fhantom CX 105 / Giant Cypress ST / EZ Sport AX / Trisled Touring Trike
    Posts
    408
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Okay the fork is definitely Chromoly.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •