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-   -   GoPro Hero (original) resolution; question to the Clydes and Athenas who record rides (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/902762-gopro-hero-original-resolution-question-clydes-athenas-who-record-rides.html)

IndianaRecRider 07-21-13 12:35 PM

GoPro Hero (original) resolution; question to the Clydes and Athenas who record rides
 
Yeah, yeah, I know. I should probably post this in the Electronics, Lighting & Gadgets forum, but since I know some of you record your rides, most notably Mr. Beanz, I thought I'd post my question here first.

When viewing your videos on a normal monitor can you tell any difference between the resolution settings?

I ask mainly because I can't tell on what we have. My wife and I went riding this morning, and I decided to record the ride. Normally when I do any kind of recording, I have the GoPro set to record at 720p (30fps). I've always gotten good results with that setting, and haven't given much thought to changing it. Well, until this morning that is. Decided to record in 1080P just for giggles and grins, so I made the adjustment to the camera setting and off we went.

When we got back home, I popped the SD card into my computer to review the video and I couldn't tell one speck of difference between the 1080p video and the 720p videos I've been making all along. Decided to do a side by side comparison, so I placed my laptop next to my desktop monitor and played an older 720p video next to this morning's video. Video quality looks pretty much identical between the two.

That got me to thinking that perhaps a non HD monitor or TV or whatever might not be able to show the true HD recording and that no difference could be noticed between it and a SD recording. Being that we don't own a HD TV or monitor, we have no way of testing that theory, which brings me back to the original question.

If anyone can shed some light on the subject, I'd greatly appreciate the information. Thanks in advance.

:)

mods: if you feel this topic would be better served in the EL&G forum, feel free to move it. AJC

jsigone 07-21-13 12:51 PM

most lcd/led pc monitors are 1080p native res, so yes I can tell the diff between 720 n 1080

blackvans1234 07-21-13 12:52 PM

Interesting question.

I don't record rides, but I watch more youtube than most :p

I find no difference between 1080 and 720 (in fullscreen on my laptop)
now if you had a 56 inch monitor, there may be a noticeable difference. (from what I understand the number 720 and 1080 represents pixels per inch, or cm, or whatever) The larger the screen the more the images are ''stretched'' to fit the screen. (now we are also limited by our monitors, however many pixels they contain).

Its kind of like if you blow up a photograph to a larger size, it gets pixelated. The photograph does not have enough pixels to stretch to that size. Its also like buying an HD tv without having HD cable. The TV may be able to produce an HD image, but if the feed is not HD then you're getting ''normal'' quality.

Something else to consider (maybe this doesn't apply to cycling), is the frame rate of filming 720 vs 1080. If the frame rate is significantly lower during 1080, you might not get as good of video during higher speed riding.

TO sum it up:
We're limited by two things:
1) the quality of recording (the camera)
2) the quality of playback (your monitor / tv )

Your quality is as good as your ''worst component''

Kinda like shooting a mouse with a bazooka.

This is all my opinion, i'm no tech expert though.

dynodonn 07-21-13 12:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IndianaRecRider (Post 15873226)
Yeah, yeah, I know. I should probably post this in the Electronics, Lighting & Gadgets forum, but since I know some of you record your rides, most notably Mr. Beanz, I thought I post my question here first.

When viewing your videos on a normal monitor can you tell any difference between the resolution settings?

I ask mainly because I can't tell on what we have. My wife and I went riding this morning, and I decided to record the ride. Normally when I do any kind of recording, I have the GoPro set to record at 720p (30fps). I've always gotten good results with that setting, and haven't given much thought to changing it. Well, until this morning that is. Decided to record in 1080P just for giggles and grins, so I made the adjustment to the camera setting and off we went.

When we got back home, I popped the SD card into my computer to review the video and I couldn't tell one speck of difference between the 1080p video and the 720p videos I've been making all along. Decided to do a side by side comparison, so I placed my laptop next to my desktop monitor and played an older 720p video next to this morning's video. Video quality looks pretty much identical between the two.

That got me to thinking that perhaps a non HD monitor or TV or whatever might not be able to show the true HD recording and that no difference could be noticed between it and a SD recording. Being that we don't own a HD TV or monitor, we have no way of testing that theory, which brings me back to the original question.

If anyone can shed some light on the subject, I'd greatly appreciate the information. Thanks in advance.

:)

I can definitely tell the difference between a 720p and a 1080p video on my monitor, but my monitor is capable of showing true 1080P HD. What is noticeable for me is being able to read a license plate number or not. I do use my videos to chronicle the urban landscape changes over the years, and making it possible for me in being able to see a lot more detail.

1nterceptor 07-21-13 01:12 PM

If you're viewing a video thru a non HD monitor/tv, you're
just seeing it in SD quality. Regardless if the source was filmed
in 720, 960 or 1080.

On my laptop with Hi Def 15.6in. screen, I can see the difference
between 720 and 1080.

TrojanHorse 07-21-13 01:13 PM

Check your resolution on your displays - my laptop is 1600x900 so 1080p isn't going to really look significantly different than 720p. My desktop monitors are at least 1080 lines and yes, I can absolutely tell the difference.

If you're just watching them at home then you will probably enjoy the extra pixels. if you're going to post them on line, 1080p starts to take up a huge amount of space.

Mr. Beanz 07-21-13 01:13 PM

I would say yes I can tell a difference but not enough to warrant going 1080 on all videos because it takes longer to open and save files. When I started with the GP I used 1080 but just too much time so I went with the next setting down. Now I prefer the 720 because it offers the 60 fps (per PhotoJoe advice) which actually works better for slo mo shots since I cross paths with many riders and bikinis.:D.

I really notice a difference watching my home originals but not a whole not once they load on youtube.

I can tell a difference but not enough to go 1080 time consuming wise. I figure half the viewers don't use or don't even know how to use the high def setting on youtube anyways.:p

BTW, I load my videos onto my computer by way of cable. I was removing the SD card but found it damaged the card after so many times. So I just bought a good quality card and leave it in to avoid damage. Those little locking devices on the side of the card are easily damaged. I do the same with my digital camera. ;)

dynodonn 07-21-13 02:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz (Post 15873319)
I would say yes I can tell a difference but not enough to warrant going 1080 on all videos because it takes longer to open and save files. When I started with the GP I used 1080 but just too much time so I went with the next setting down. Now I prefer the 720 because it offers the 60 fps (per PhotoJoe advice) which actually works better for slo mo shots since I cross paths with many riders and bikinis.:D.

That's one reason why I run in the highest 1080p resolution, even at 30fps, I open my videos with Windows media player, where I can click my videos frame by frame. :thumb:

Mr. Beanz 07-21-13 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dynodonn (Post 15873501)
that's one reason why i run in the highest 1080p resolution, even at 30fps, i open my videos with windows media player, where i can click my videos frame by frame. :thumb:

:thumb:

IndianaRecRider 07-21-13 06:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1nterceptor (Post 15873316)
If you're viewing a video thru a non HD monitor/tv, you're
just seeing it in SD quality.
Regardless if the source was filmed
in 720, 960 or 1080.

On my laptop with Hi Def 15.6in. screen, I can see the difference
between 720 and 1080.

And I'm pretty sure this (approximately) 8 to 10 year old desktop monitor is not capable of any kind of HD so that's probably why it doesn't look any better than the 720p videos I've done. Haven't been able to determine if the screen on my 2 year old laptop can do HD or not, although I'm guessing "not" since the video I did this morning doesn't look any better than on the desktop monitor.

In any event, I guess it's not that big of an issue since like I said in my OP I've been pleased with the 720p videos I've done up to this point. Just thought it would be fun to try true HD.

Thanks to everyone who replied. I appreciate the info.

:)

IndianaRecRider 07-21-13 06:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr. Beanz (Post 15873319)
I would say yes I can tell a difference but not enough to warrant going 1080 on all videos because it takes longer to open and save files. When I started with the GP I used 1080 but just too much time so I went with the next setting down. Now I prefer the 720 because it offers the 60 fps (per PhotoJoe advice) which actually works better for slo mo shots since I cross paths with many riders and bikinis.:D.

I really notice a difference watching my home originals but not a whole not once they load on youtube.

I can tell a difference but not enough to go 1080 time consuming wise. I figure half the viewers don't use or don't even know how to use the high def setting on youtube anyways.:p

BTW, I load my videos onto my computer by way of cable. I was removing the SD card but found it damaged the card after so many times. So I just bought a good quality card and leave it in to avoid damage. Those little locking devices on the side of the card are easily damaged. I do the same with my digital camera. ;)

And some nice slo-mo shots you have. LOL!! :D

Do have a question for you Mr. Beanz if you don't mind. When recording at 60fps (which I have never done), does it affect the playback at regular speeds at all? Is the playback visually similar to a recording done at 30fps? Thanks.

:)

Mr. Beanz 07-21-13 08:01 PM

I wouldn't/couldn't tell a difference if there was. I've never heard any complaints. But I can say some shots are more slo motionable than others. Not sure why but those I just leave in 1x speed. Some reason they come out like robotics while others are smooth motion. Not sure if it's the lighting or what. As far as noticable in res trojanhorse mentioned a big differ when I posted my first go pro video in 1080 :D

IndianaRecRider 07-21-13 08:16 PM

Thanks Beanz, I appreciate the info.

:)

Mr. Beanz 07-21-13 09:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IndianaRecRider (Post 15874373)
Thanks Beanz, I appreciate the info.

:)

:thumb:


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