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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 08-04-13, 09:33 AM   #1
Notgrownup
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Broken spoke....am i too big for my CAAD8 stockers?

So i have a 2013 CAAD8 with the 2300 groupset..For reference....I have about 150 miles on it and today on my ride i broke a spoke...that seems like very low miles to me for a broken spoke.... should i start looking for different wheels? I weigh 245 lbs...I really love the bike, rolls great...My LBS is off for a week so i am heading to Perf.Bikes in Raleigh (1.5 hour ride)...At least i will be on my other 2 wheel horse (HD)...
Any recommendations....similar issues or comments...Yes i need to lose weight....Was 275 6 months ago so i am doing something right...
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Old 08-04-13, 09:39 AM   #2
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Depending on the quality of wheel will help dictate how easily it will break.

I had a super cheap wheel go out of true after a few months, had the LBS adjust it for 20 bucks, then a week later I broke two spokes on the thing.
And im only 200 pounds (heh...only)

Now im sure the CAAD8 wheel is a little higher of quality, but who knows how good the wheels are (I dont)
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Old 08-04-13, 09:43 AM   #3
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I have found that bike manufacturers tend to cut the cost of bikes by using marginal wheelsets, on all but the top tier bikes. My last two bikes had crummy wheels, one of them a Cannondale, on which I broke spokes and had to rebuild the wheels. This was long ago, when I weighed about 185.

My Specialized Allez Elite had Alex wheels; they required constant truing and were "soft" to ride on. I replaced them with some better wheels and got much better performance and lower maintenance.

My advice would be to rebuild the wheels and/or buy a good aftermarket set. If you rebuild your current wheels and buy a good set, you'll have a spare set, just in case you need it.
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Old 08-04-13, 09:52 AM   #4
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From what I have seen your wheels have 32 spokes. I can't find out much past that.
32 spokes should handle your weight if properly tensioned.
On which side is the broken spoke? On which end did the break occur?
Answers to those questions will help a lot.
I have weighed 270# and ridden 32 spoke wheels without a problem.
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Old 08-04-13, 11:02 AM   #5
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I started riding at 250lbs on Bontrager Race lite 28 spoke wheels. Now have 7,000 miles and 3 years on them without ever being touched other than the 1 month check up the LBS did. These were the stock wheels on a ~$1,200 bike.

I'd hope you just need a re-tensioning and all will be good.
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Old 08-04-13, 04:44 PM   #6
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From what I have seen your wheels have 32 spokes. I can't find out much past that.
32 spokes should handle your weight if properly tensioned.
On which side is the broken spoke? On which end did the break occur?
Answers to those questions will help a lot.
I have weighed 270# and ridden 32 spoke wheels without a problem.
Broke at the hub on the cassette side The wheels are Maddux R3.0 double wall.

Last edited by Notgrownup; 08-04-13 at 04:54 PM.
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Old 08-04-13, 04:47 PM   #7
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I took it to Performancer bike and they replaced the spoke and trued the wheel...$30... whill i was there i bought an extra spoke and a cassette removal tool...I am making me a trueing stand out of a old fork...I will talk to my LBS when he comes back from Vacation...
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Old 08-04-13, 04:55 PM   #8
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I have found that bike manufacturers tend to cut the cost of bikes by using marginal wheelsets, on all but the top tier bikes. My last two bikes had crummy wheels, one of them a Cannondale, on which I broke spokes and had to rebuild the wheels. This was long ago, when I weighed about 185.

My Specialized Allez Elite had Alex wheels; they required constant truing and were "soft" to ride on. I replaced them with some better wheels and got much better performance and lower maintenance.

My advice would be to rebuild the wheels and/or buy a good aftermarket set. If you rebuild your current wheels and buy a good set, you'll have a spare set, just in case you need it.
My Specialized Tricross Sport had Alex wheels and I put over 5000 miles on them before cracking the back rim on a pothole during a fast descent with a loaded pannier. I weigh around 250, and until I hit the pothole the only trouble I had in those 5000+ miles was a single broken spoke. Having hit the pothole I didn't realise I'd cracked the rim, but did find cycling up the next big hill unusually hard. I thought I had an issue with my brakes, but when I mounted the new tyres I'd ordered and gave the wheel a quick spin to make sure the tyre was fully seated I realised it was badly out of true so checked for a broken spoke, then realised the rim was cracked. The front wheel is still in service, although since it doesn't match my new back wheel (which I built myself, figuring the need for a wheel was as good an excuse as I'd ever get to teach myself how to build wheels) it may get replaced in the not too distant future.
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Old 08-04-13, 06:49 PM   #9
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IF you break a 2nd spoke, #3 etc. will shortly follow due to fatigue in the J bend.
In that case, rebuild the wheel with new double butted spokes and have it properly TENSIONED.
Had the tensioning been done first, you wouldn't be having the problem.
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Old 08-04-13, 06:58 PM   #10
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I have found that most broken spokes are caused by being tensioned wrong in the first place. With only 150 miles on the wheel, there was probably one spoke too tight. Good that you got it in to a pro to get it trued and tensioned correctly. Hopefully that will solve the issue for you. Also, use high quality spokes, DT Swiss is all I use for my builds.
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Old 08-05-13, 04:23 AM   #11
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I would presume the bike had been properly set up by my LBS in the first place...I guess i presumed wrong, Maybe...
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Old 08-05-13, 05:30 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Notgrownup View Post
Broke at the hub on the cassette side The wheels are Maddux R3.0 double wall.
That typically indicates that that spoke, or all the spokes are overtensioned.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Notgrownup View Post
I took it to Performancer bike and they replaced the spoke and trued the wheel...$30... whill i was there i bought an extra spoke and a cassette removal tool...I am making me a trueing stand out of a old fork...I will talk to my LBS when he comes back from Vacation...
Did they check the tension or retension all the spokes, or just the broken one?
If they retensioned, I would hope that you are good to go.
Good luck!
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Old 08-05-13, 06:09 AM   #13
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I took it to Performancer bike and they replaced the spoke and trued the wheel...$30... whill i was there i bought an extra spoke and a cassette removal tool...I am making me a trueing stand out of a old fork...I will talk to my LBS when he comes back from Vacation...
You'll also need a chain whip to take the cassette off, if you don't already have one.
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Old 08-05-13, 07:23 AM   #14
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Broke a 2nd one after only 3 miles...I'm done for now... i will wait until my LBS where i bought the bike from gets back from Vacation...I am pissed that i wasted a 1.5 hour ride and $30 at Perf. Bikes...Now i can't ride for the rest of the week because i am not wasting more money on something that is only a month old and will be fixed for free...
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Old 08-05-13, 09:15 AM   #15
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Broke a 2nd one after only 3 miles...I'm done for now... i will wait until my LBS where i bought the bike from gets back from Vacation...I am pissed that i wasted a 1.5 hour ride and $30 at Perf. Bikes...Now i can't ride for the rest of the week because i am not wasting more money on something that is only a month old and will be fixed for free...
I'd be upset too!
ARE these 32 spoke wheels?

The problem is the spokes are UNDERTENSIONED.
As the wheel rolls, the spoke goes slack and then as it goes 180 degrees, it gets kind of a "running start" to heavy tension and over flexes the J bend. FATIGUE. (Boing....Boing....)
Also, if all the spokes are "loose", each individual spoke takes more of a load, instead of the adjacent spokes "sharing" the load.

Double butted spokes are thinner in the middle and that reduced section "absorbs" some of the elongation that occurs as the wheel rolls, "sparing" the J bend to some extent.
Look at your rear wheel-
When you pedal, you are basically attempting to "unwind" 1/2 your spokes
That reduces tension on those and increases tension on the "drive" spokes.

Something else I would do is go to a slightly larger tire IF it will fit.
I'm 235 and tried a 23mm on the front of my Hybrid.
Too harsh. Something like a 25-28mm would be more appropriate for your weight and also absorb a lot more impact from the road, saving the wheel.
I'm running 26's and it really cut down on the "road buzz" to my hands.
At least consider larger for the rear, since that wheel carries about 60% of your weight..

Last edited by Bill Kapaun; 08-05-13 at 09:25 AM.
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Old 08-05-13, 10:04 AM   #16
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2300 level bikes tend to come with the cheapest possible wheelsets. I weighed under 160 pounds when I had my 2300 bike, and I snapped multiple spokes on the cheap Jalco rear wheel. It came through out of true, and the shop could never get it trued perfectly, no matter how hard they tried. I finally junked it at about 4000 miles when I snapped 3 spokes in one ride. Nursed it home at about 6-8 mph.

OTOH, my wife is an Athena, and she hasn't had any issues at all on her 2300 equipped Trek with the entry level "Bontrager Approved" wheels.
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Old 08-05-13, 10:33 AM   #17
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Like i said previously, i would presume that my LBS would've had the wheels set for me to go with it and then after yesterday at Performance bike "suposedly" mechanics trued the wheel and adjusted it ... I will just take a break until Monday because i am not spending another dime on the issue right now...I will ride my wife's Walmart Schwinn.
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Old 08-05-13, 11:21 AM   #18
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I have chased this broken spoke thing before... Did it so often I am now very proficient at removal, replacement and realignment of my wheels...

Solution is to go to a stronger wheel - And learn how to true your own wheels - Its not hard if you stay to the quarter turn rule - If you don't have the money for a fancy wheel then go to a steel rim with 14 ga spokes...


There's a good light weight wheel set at Sheldon/Harris for a reasonable price that is machine built - That means you will have to true the wheel after each of the first few short rides to get it set just right...

http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/wheels/630.html
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Old 08-05-13, 01:26 PM   #19
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On the lower cost bikes, all the LBS is going to do is a quick true.
Tensioning is too time consuming.

IF your rims are 32 spoke or more, the rim/hub should be more than adequate.
You just need some good spokes that are properly tensioned and you won't have another issue, barring crash/accident.

Heck, if you lived in my neighborhood, I'd have you supply the spokes of my choice and I'd relace/tension/true the wheel for a cheap dinner.

Not sure why zandoval would refer you to 27" rims with a Free Wheel hub?

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Old 08-05-13, 01:43 PM   #20
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looking at the Cannondale spec's, I think I see part of the problem-
http://www.cannondale.com/2013/bikes...mpact-crankset

15 ga. spokes.
For a rear wheel, 14/15 ga double butted should be fine, but I certainly wouldn't use straight 15's on a rear!

I built a set of 32 spoke wheels for my hybrid last Winter using Sun Rims M13 II's.
I used 15/16 DB's on the front and rear NDS with 14/15 DB on the rear DS.
With about 30 miles on the wheels, I accidentally dropped the rear wheel in an old style storm drain with the long slots. The impact bounced me about 8" out of the seat.
I did have to tweak a couple spokes to get everything back to normal, but no other obvious damage.
I'm only 10-15 lbs. lighter than you.

Go to the link above and write a review- Maybe Cannondale will take an extra step to help you out?
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Old 08-05-13, 01:51 PM   #21
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Spoke tension, spoke tension, spoke tension.

Given how quickly you've already broken a second spoke I would presume all the spokes have fatigued. New spokes and a decent, quality build should solve your issues.

Most shops don't perform any additional prep to the wheels that come in the box for each bike. Which is extremely unfortunate in the case of sales to clydes.

I agree, It's highly unlikely that the Perf. shop took the time to tension balance if the bill was only $30. However, the cost of a full wheel build from a reputable builder, including stress relieving and tension balancing shouldn't be over $75.

Best of luck with getting it sorted.
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Old 08-05-13, 02:00 PM   #22
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I called Performance bike and spoke to the guy who did the word... he said he checked the tightness of all the other spokes but failed to say "properly tensioned"???? anyway...i will report back next week when i get the bike back...In the meantime i will be looking a 36 spoke from Ebay, Maybe a Mavic or Easton...I would like to have a spare wheel.
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Old 08-05-13, 02:19 PM   #23
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looking at the Cannondale spec's, I think I see part of the problem-
http://www.cannondale.com/2013/bikes...mpact-crankset

15 ga. spokes.
For a rear wheel, 14/15 ga double butted should be fine, but I certainly wouldn't use straight 15's on a rear!?
You nailed it. I was about to post the same thing. For straight gauge spokes I would not use 15 gauge (1.8 mm) spokes if it were a heavy rider. I would use 14 gauge spokes, that would be reasonably durable on a 32 hole wheel.

Better yet would be double butted 14/15/14 spokes which are 2.0 at the J bend into the hubs and 2.0 where it connects to the rim, and 1.8 in the middle. Spokes normally break at either end, not in the middle. Having it thinner in the middle also reduces stress on the hub flange. I have had two rear hubs that failed when the flange pulled away from the hub body right at the root of the flange (granted, after many, many miles of riding). One a Dura-Ace 36 hole and one a DT Swiss 32 hole.

If I was you and starting from scratch I'd go 36 double butted spokes in the back with a tough rim like a Velocity Deep-V. That's what I have on both of my most frequently ridden road bikes. Oh and I am 6'7" and about 270 lbs and I create mayhem on bike components
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Old 08-05-13, 03:14 PM   #24
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i WILL BE SEARCHING...and scouring the web... maybe come across a deal on fleebay....Not in a rush...I am gonna wait to see what my LBS can do for me..
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Old 08-05-13, 03:28 PM   #25
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I broke 3 spokes in the first 150 miles with my new Trek. LBS replaced the wheel under warranty. No issues since, but then again, I don't ride that bike as much.
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