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  1. #1
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    A rant about today's ride

    I'm upset with myself.
    I've been cycling inconsistently for the past two years. However, for the last two months I've buckled down to regular rides on a Saturday and Sunday. My Saturday rides are usually shorter (20-25 miles average speed 17mph). On the Sunday rides I've peaked at about 50 miles, same average speed.
    During the week I use an indoor trainer or ride depending on the responsibilities at home. (I've two kids under 3). I'd say that the trainer is great for allowing me to focus on improving spinning/breathing, however its not the same as being on the road. I'm doing the best I can given my time constraints.
    For the last couple of weeks I've introduced hills, and it has been hard. I've a 50/34 crankset with a 12-25T cassette.
    I am 5'9" at 228 lbs. I've lost 10 lbs since I've been riding regularly this last time and made the necessary changes to my diet. No sugar etc. This is my first real focused effort at improving on the hills. I think I'm making slow, but sure, progress.


    Now, here comes the rant.

    I have this idea that one day I can ride with a group, but every time I get together with someone else to ride, that person puts on some type of 'coaching hat', thinking that I can do "this" or "that" to improve. Now, don't get me wrong, I love listening to how I can improve, but I am F#@... fed up of people not understanding that "if i could ride faster I would" or "If I could climb faster I would".

    I am also tired of planning on a type of ride a week before, then the night before plans (which usually means intensity and distance) change. When hills are involved, this becomes a nightmare. There is a tremendous psychological defeat that usually follows.

    The guys in the group are fitter than me. It seems that they are trying to set a progress rate for me that I just can't keep up with. Today was my lowest in point in terms of discouragement and frustration.

    As usual the plans changed last night, and the hill was THE LONGEST AND HIGHEST I HAVE EVER NOT SEEN. I say "not seen", because I never saw the end of it. I quit after I'd had enough, turned around and returned home.

    That's right. I quit. I've never quit a ride before. I found myself at this place where I was thrashing about and hating the fact that I was not riding alone, as I should be.

    However, it's my fault because I agreed to go on the ride. I could have changed my mind. I have only myself to blame.

    The good news is, that I am certain now that my best way forward is to rediscover cycling...alone.

    I'm not interested in the competitiveness and the "coaches".

    The concept of group rides and camaraderie will have to remain just that for a while.

    end rant

    Now that I'm looking at it more objectively, I'm seeing how I could have dissected the hill, found areas to recover etc. However, my body is saying that I'm doing too much too fast. I don't think I will improve by throwing myself into the deep end like this.

    Planning and structure is important to me, not impressing other people.

    So, I'm still here, looking forward to tomorrow...literally.

    I've worked out a ten week, "newbie friendly" training plan, that allows me to build on the best that I've achieved, while being mindful of my weaker areas.

    Cycling as a sport may be nearing rocket science, but having fun should never be.

  2. #2
    Junior Member xbrizzax's Avatar
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    Hard part about replying to your post is I don't want to come off as trying to coach, or give you a load of sunshine either. I just got back into riding after a 25 year hiatus (also have a little 8 month old boy), and it has been the best thing and the hardest thing I have ever done. When I stopped riding I was at the top of my game, a respectable Junior rider who could keep up with the CAT 2-3 guys in our club and snipe a win here and there. But, I stopped went to college, got a desk job, ate crap food, drank too many beers.... Now I am 25 years older, 55 pounds heavier than my prime, but still have the same damn competitive edge.

    The reason I say all that is that I think you have that same edge. You want to be faster, you want to do better, but you can't right now. It sucks, and that is where I am at too, but there is a way that has helped me at least, and in part sounds like your plan. Compete against yourself, set goals and try to break them. I use Strava and have hidden segments for different areas I am working on, and a 10 mile TT course. I use these as a measuring stick on how I am improving. I also picked up the Timed Crunched Cyclist and have been following the advice in there. I am seeing steady improvement, but still have bad days here and there. However, as I keep going I am getting stronger week to week and that is feeding that edge, I want to beat that guy I was a week ago.

    As for group rides, they are all different depending on the group and what the "rules" are. I would not shy away from them, but I would talk to the folks and get an idea what the ride is about. I would also explain my level of fitness and how receptive of a mood I am to get feedback. The group rides are where you are going to make your biggest gains if your head is on right and you give it your all. Don't be afraid to get dropped and use it as motivation to get back out again and hang with them longer. Unless the guys you ride with are total ******, they will respect the effort and cheer you on to do more.

    Regardless, just ride to make yourself happy, get fitter and have fun, always.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    IF you can't find a group that fits your "needs", than ride alone.
    You can set your own goals.
    Some encouragement can bring out the best in us. Too much.........

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the encouragement xbrizzax.
    I'm not ruling out group rides in a few months. However, the groups do tend to drift off of the rules a lot in terms of intensity, distance. I understand with fitter riders, time constraints being what they are, you will not always have the patience for slower riders. For example I cannot increase both speed and distance from one week to the next. It's reaching a point where I'm flat out without recovering within 20 mins of a 3hr ride.

    What's happening as well is I'm trying to lose weight, so as intensity goes up, I tend to bonk very quickly.(I'm still working out non-processed food carb sources.) All these reasons suggest to me that I should aim to build consistency on my own while sorting out diet issues.

    I'll catch them one day!



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Kapaun View Post
    IF you can't find a group that fits your "needs", than ride alone.
    You can set your own goals.
    Some encouragement can bring out the best in us. Too much.........
    Yeah...I think that's where I'm at now.

  6. #6
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Well, riding should be fun, or at least enjoyable, so if you're not having fun, tweak the formula.

    It's frustrating riding with people who are faster than you but that's also the fastest path to getting faster yourself because you will push yourself harder than you would solo. 17mph is a pretty respectable average, but obviously there are faster people out there and there will always be people out there who are faster than you. Just shake it off and keep at it, sounds like you are doing well.

  7. #7
    Ancient Clydesdale 2 wheeler's Avatar
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    In my younger years I was guilty of training for the Tour de France that I never entered or even had a chance at qualifying for. It's easy to go right past the fun of cycling and enter the "performance equals self worth zone".

    Do your own ride. I'm perfectly happy to ride alone; it's a good thing since no one in my tiny town rides seriously.

    I have motivated myself by taking part in the 100 Mile+ Club this month. I was doing 10 to 15 mile rides only until I started the Club. Now I'm up to doing rides of 28 miles and hope to top 35 soon.

    Have fun and don't fall into the "performance equals self worth" cult!!

  8. #8
    Endangered Serotta Rider Lacumo's Avatar
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    Sounds like the self-declared (and maybe unsolicited?) "coaches" are a bunch of Chris Carmichael Wannabes. Unless you're training for some competitive event(s), I don't see
    the need for that mindset. Yeah---it's great to lead the pack, drop everybody else like so many hot potatoes, be at the top of your game and setting new records and you do
    burn more calories by riding faster, etc,etc, blah,blah, IF that's what you're into.

    If what you're into is something else--like improving your physical condition through enjoyable recreational cycling--that whole competition thing may not be the best fit for you.

    I tried to fit in with the >16mph group rides and found that clique and that attitude weren't for me. I felt out of place and unaccepted from the start of my ill-fated attempt to
    fit in and so I gravitated back into solo riding in fairly short order. I've never regretted the decision and never looked back ever since. If and when I want to be a full team kit
    wearing killer fashionista and treat getting to the top of Cardiac Arrest Mountain before anybody else like it was the #1 priority in my life, I'll start dressing and behaving that
    way when I make that decision. I doubt that'll be happening any time soon.

    I really enjoy my solo rides. I go where I want, when I want and at the speed I want. No peer pressure and nobody looking down at me with benign condescension because
    I'm not as "good" as they are.

    I think there's a lot to be said for a self-designed training regimen. I have several books I've used to design mine and "The Time-Crunched Cyclist" is one of the better ones.

    Some of us are meant to be pack riders, some of us are better suited to solo riding and I know which I'm best suited to. Best of luck with finding your own path...

  9. #9
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    Thanks guys for the positive posts. It really is a "performance = self worth" thing sometimes.

    What I find most encouraging about this forum is examples like 2 wheeler's distance. It's OK to do "short" rides to build foundation. It's really important to have clear goals and stick to them.


    I just had a long talk with one of the guys from the ride this morning. (He did the talking mostly, I did the listening). He pointed out that the other guys on the ride thought my cadence was too high on the flats. I'm very comfortable with,what every one says is, 90-95. I tried to explain that, apart from being comfortable, I can ride at (the perceived) 90-95 for days with no issues. I don't have a cadence meter.
    He's insisting that I should drop a gear and go down to 80-85. Ok. Been there, done that, and you know what ? I get tired and cramp up by the end of a long ride with such a low cadence. What's the problem if I can maintain a high cadence, comfortably for the same distance?
    The guys also have racing cranksets. Since their 38 chainring and my 34 chainring are not the same, my cadence was a little higher, TO KEEP UP!
    (I'd be "mashing" on a smaller sprocket, with the lower cadence.)

    Could someone explain if my "science" is correct?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lacumo View Post
    I think there's a lot to be said for a self-designed training regimen. I have several books I've used to design mine and "The Time-Crunched Cyclist" is one of the better ones.

    Some of us are meant to be pack riders, some of us are better suited to solo riding and I know which I'm best suited to. Best of luck with finding your own path...
    This is precisely what I realizing! Thanks again for the recommendation of "The time crunched cyclist". I'll definitely check it out.

  11. #11
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    rteesdale,

    Your experience is not entirely unique. There has been at least one other C&A participant in the last year who suffered similiar issues. I don't know where you live, or how many different cycling groups there are there. But, cycling groups are like any other social group.....all over the show with regard to how they function,......or malfunction.

    17mph is a perfectly respectable average and if you're in a metropolitan area of much size chances are that there is a group you'll really enjoy. Just keep looking.

    Heck. I ride with up to three different groups and while there are some commonalities between them besides the fact that we're all on bikes, they are quite different in how they function. One is a formal club, with a published ride schedule, course maps, Ride Leaders, Tail End Charlies, a safety officer, sign-in-out sheet, appointed departure times for various groups, etc. Another is an informal group that meets at the same place every Tuesday and Thursday morning, two routes, Tuesday is hilly at a slightly higher intensity, Thursday is flat and lower intensity, no formal leader, follower, or anything else. But, a couple of veterans that do effectively marshall the ride if anyone behaves out of of line with the groups long standing expectations with regard to safe riding and pace. And, they will always stop if someone has a mechanical or other issue. These guys are sufficiently consistant that I could plan to leave the house at a certain time and know almost exactly where I will run into them. The third group is really about 2-5 groups who all meet at the same parking lot on Saturday mornings. There's little consistant about this group, other than start time and place. You show up negotiate who's going where with who and which group you're going to ride with and then see if it actually materializes that way. Occassionaly a few of us will e-mail our intent around so that others show up prepared for a long ride or not anticipating one, but, even that frequently falls through. These rides can be some of my most frustrating, but, also my most challenging or rewarding. I've worked my way up from the slowest/shortest group to leave the lot to the point where I can ride with any of the groups that leave from there. I've seen about everything you can imagine. From blissful, spirited rides through the countryside or city that we all returned from glowing, to guys bonking 60km from home and needing to be towed back, groups agreeably splintering down to 1 and 2s, arguements, pouting, temp tantrums, almost fisticuffs, ambulance calls, guys stopping for each other and occassions when guys have been left behind when they obviously would have benefitted from assistance, banging on cars, police calls. You name it.

    If the commaraderie of a group holds any appeal to you and it sounds as though it does, keep looking for your ideal bunch of riding buddies. They're out there. Don't feel bad about avoiding those that you're not enjoying at the moment.
    Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rteesdale View Post
    Could someone explain if my "science" is correct?
    I've learned very quickly (got back on the bike a few months after a 15+ year hiatus) that you have to ride your own ride. My current level of fitness and capability has me too fast for the slower groups and too slow for the faster groups in my area and getting dropped early in a 40+ mile que-less group ride is no fun. I'd much prefer the dynamic and fun of a group ride but ultimately if I'm going to cruise around for 2-3 hours on my weekend mornings I want to maximize my time on the saddle.

    For every 2-3 groups I see cruise by me, there's another dozen solo riders. The other day at a red light, one of those solo riders who was chatty decided to ride along side me for a bit (I welcomed it). We got to talk about solo riding versus the group dynamic and we both agreed that there's definitely advantages and disadvantages to each. He was a much stronger rider than me and I asked him what his secret was to enjoy a group ride. It took him a moment but his insight made sense:

    Be able to maintain 15-20% more than the group average for half of that ride's distance. It made sense, really. If I was stronger than the group average I could chase/attack/hammer along with the other people who opted to introduce that element into a casual ride. This way when I want to zip along side them I could but I was also capable of completing the run with the group when I needed to let my heart rate return to normal levels.

  13. #13
    Endangered Serotta Rider Lacumo's Avatar
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    rteesdale---I know your cycling time is most likely your "get away from it all" private/personal time, but... If you got one of those Burley child trailers and tried towing one of your little ones around on a local "Rails to Trails" path, you might find yourself in for the workout of the month. Get hubby towing the other one in another trailer behind his bike and you could get into day-long mini-tours that the hill-climbing heroes might well have trouble handling. Concerns about gear ratios, cadence, heart rate, wattage output, chasing/attacking/hammering/dropping and all the rest of that stuff would likely become a rapidly fading memory and you'd be into simply enjoying a family weekend ride.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Peiper1's Avatar
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    I simply cannot imaging ever going on a group ride. I have always ridden solo or with my wife, and I/we never worry about average speed, distance, etc. Riding a bike is simply about having fun and getting a good workout. Nothing more.
    2012 Trek Madone 5.2
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peiper1 View Post
    I simply cannot imaging ever going on a group ride. I have always ridden solo or with my wife, and I/we never worry about average speed, distance, etc. Riding a bike is simply about having fun and getting a good workout. Nothing more.

    Mrs. Fred used to express the same emotions about group rides and events.


    After deciding to try each of those on her own accord, we're now members of a cycling club and she participates in "events".

    There is something to be said for the commaraderie of riding with a group who come to represent your extended circle of friends. The sort of friends when you don't show up for the second week in a row, call or stop by to say "hi", make sure you're alright, see if there's anything they can do to help, etc. Almost like "real friends" or "community" that is so often missing today. Mrs. Fred and I have some of our cycling friends around for dinner, we've vacationed with some (both cycling and non-holidays).

    In real life concerns with average speed are probably far less than they appear on the inter-webz. Imagine riding a bike and having the fun multiplied by the number of participants and still getting a good workout in. Or, even a better workout in than you would have on your own. Then, enjoying a coffee and scone or beer and chips around a table with the same individuals while trading stories about the trails or roads you've just ridden. Laughing about the one who fell because of "a pine cone". Or the fun of everyone going "wheee" down a decent.

    Riding in a group, whether it's 2 or 20 can be fun. As can riding alone. All things in moderation.
    Birth Certificate, Passport, Marriage License Driver's License and Residency Permit all say I'm a Fred. I guess there's no denying it.

  16. #16
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    I don't think its the group ride that is the problem but fear of them hills.

    Simple question from me...do you enjoy going downhill be it twisty or straight? If yes then you need to embrace hills. You are on a bike and they are on your home course. Yes we can't climb as fast as the feather weights or the strong. But just make it up the darn hill so you can enjoy the sweet decent. If the group waits, that's great and good bunch or guys. If not...well one day they might wait or you climb fast enough to keep them in distance.

  17. #17
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    Group riding can be enjoyable, but you really need to be in a group that has a similar mindset to yourself. I ride with 2 separate groups on Sat and Sun, both have very different approaches to training/riding.

    I'm part of a racing club, and the majority of riders in the Sat group are from the club, as well as some triathletes and some regular riders. This group was originally the Sat morning social ride. There is a ride that starts around 1 1/2 hrs earlier for the really serious riders and that is where the big push is done. The later ride is 1 1/2 hrs as well, but the organisation is generally keeping the bunch together on the way out, and then on the way back it's every man for himself. Pretty much all rides in my locality are out and back rides, no loops. I love to hit it out with the better riders and hang on for as long as I can. It's how you get better, but there is no shame in dropping off. Over time this bunch has increased in speed by the nature of the rider majority being racing club riders. As we progress into spring/summer there will be the fair weather riders coming out of the woodwork. We are happy for them to tag along for as long as they can. We let them know what goes on, and there are no hassles with them riding a shorter distance or dropping off. We offer them a target for performance rather than being a group that they will have to learn some secret handshake to be a part of.

    My Sunday morning riding crew are a lot more relaxed and a tad slower, which suits me as I like to take it a bit easier then. There are a couple of riders that are better that come along from time to time and having little hitouts with them is fun.

    Now with both of these rides, there is a stop and wait unwritten rule at the turnaround. It gives riders a chance to recoup and have a drink before the gauntlet is thrown down in the case of the Sat ride, or just to keep everyone together on Sundays.

    Now aside from all this, is the note that my riding objectives are different from pretty much every other person on these rides. Yes I want to get bettter and I do race road, but I have grown to love track cycling, and in particular the sprint style disciplines. This means that the road riders are way above me when the roads turn upwards or grow in length. I kind of ride my own ride within the bunch knowing that is the case. I don't really care if I get left behind on hills, and I pretty much always get dropped on the return leg on Sat, but I ride this ride for fitness and the push does that for me. I kind of stumbled across the Sunday group while I was riding recovery tempo rides on my own and I really like the group, and their speed is in keeping with my objectives.

    Anything else I do through the week is on my own, because my objectives are different.

    It sounds like you enjoy group riding, but the group you have found is a tad above you. Ride on your own if you like, or search for another group to ride with. Keep the group you mention in your sights as a target for performance. Keep your own objectives in mind, and don't let the objectives of others rule you. I am a firm believer that cycling is an individual sport. You can race or ride as part of a team or group, but in the end, the goals are yours to determine, not for someone else to determine for you.

    Also, I would say that you should not look at your pulling out of the ride as giving up. If you think you went as hard as you could for as long as you could, then it is hardly giving up!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peiper1 View Post
    I simply cannot imaging ever going on a group ride. I have always ridden solo or with my wife, and I/we never worry about average speed, distance, etc. Riding a bike is simply about having fun and getting a good workout. Nothing more.
    Could not agree more.

    I ride for several reasons. Fitness/weight loss/basic exercise. I'm 262 right now and need to drop some weight.

    Fun. I was always athletic and at my age, cycling gives me an opportunity to feel athletic when I want to. I push myself, or I don't. I ride with my wife or alone. I love riding through the local villages and checking out the houses and landscaping. I love riding through the farmland in the area and seeing horses, cow, deer, cornfields and hay fields.

    Joining up with a group of riders with my crappy bike, level (or lack) of conditioning, the fact that I have a granny gear and that I'm not into cadence/wattage and that I ride in regular shorts and a t-shirt would put me in a place I'm totally uncomfortable with and into a level of competitiveness that I'd rather avoid when I'm outside of work. On a flat route, I'm a 15-16 mph guy. When I do a hilly route it's more like 12mph. I know I could not keep up.

    I love cycling and don't want to turn it into something I'll hate.
    Last edited by dexter9326; 08-19-13 at 06:35 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lacumo View Post
    rteesdale---I know your cycling time is most likely your "get away from it all" private/personal time, but... If you got one of those Burley child trailers and tried towing one of your little ones around on a local "Rails to Trails" path, you might find yourself in for the workout of the month. Get hubby towing the other one in another trailer behind his bike and you could get into day-long mini-tours that the hill-climbing heroes might well have trouble handling. Concerns about gear ratios, cadence, heart rate, wattage output, chasing/attacking/hammering/dropping and all the rest of that stuff would likely become a rapidly fading memory and you'd be into simply enjoying a family weekend ride.
    lol...This is great suggestion actually!
    I live in the caribbean (Trinidad and Tobago ) nearby there is a nature park that has great opportunities for family cycling on trials with kiddies in tow. Thanks for reminding me!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
    I don't think its the group ride that is the problem but fear of them hills.

    Simple question from me...do you enjoy going downhill be it twisty or straight? If yes then you need to embrace hills. You are on a bike and they are on your home course. Yes we can't climb as fast as the feather weights or the strong. But just make it up the darn hill so you can enjoy the sweet decent. If the group waits, that's great and good bunch or guys. If not...well one day they might wait or you climb fast enough to keep them in distance.
    I'll say I'm more disappointed with my approach to hills, than fearful of hills. Grinding and mashing at hills seems to be my only option on a group ride. I can ride outdoors only 3 days per week, due to time constraints. If two out of the three days are group rides, I'm only left one day for hill training. When I do hill repeats I can be with myself, zig-zag, find my way to the top without stopping. At my weight, I need to spend more time with myself and hills generally so that I am comfortable with my approach.
    The thing is my particular group, while understanding that I am less fit; they've appointed themselves as coaches. They're all self taught, but what works for some of them has not worked for me. I've tried it.
    Here's another example. In the last 6 weeks I went from riding 20 miles to 50 miles. There is no training program that will endorse that rate of increase in distance over time, unless you were probably an advanced rider coming back out after a little hiatus. (I am relatively new)
    I'll think about what you've suggested, but I'm thinking that I need a more disciplined approach to what I am doing.

    Downhill straight or twisty is cool. It's fun. I prefer MTB downhills though. (I've a MTB as well)

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dexter9326 View Post
    I love cycling and don't want to turn it into something I'll hate.
    Yesterday was the first time I've ever felt..."I hate this". I am definitely going to nip that feeling in the bud

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by brawlo View Post
    Keep your own objectives in mind, and don't let the objectives of others rule you. I am a firm believer that cycling is an individual sport. You can race or ride as part of a team or group, but in the end, the goals are yours to determine, not for someone else to determine for you.

    Also, I would say that you should not look at your pulling out of the ride as giving up. If you think you went as hard as you could for as long as you could, then it is hardly giving up!
    Yeah...I think this is where I'm at right now. We are all individuals. I'll do my own thing and check in with them if and when I think it will be mutually beneficial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfred View Post
    Mrs. Fred used to express the same emotions about group rides and events.


    After deciding to try each of those on her own accord, we're now members of a cycling club and she participates in "events".

    There is something to be said for the commaraderie of riding with a group who come to represent your extended circle of friends. The sort of friends when you don't show up for the second week in a row, call or stop by to say "hi", make sure you're alright, see if there's anything they can do to help, etc. Almost like "real friends" or "community" that is so often missing today. Mrs. Fred and I have some of our cycling friends around for dinner, we've vacationed with some (both cycling and non-holidays).

    In real life concerns with average speed are probably far less than they appear on the inter-webz. Imagine riding a bike and having the fun multiplied by the number of participants and still getting a good workout in. Or, even a better workout in than you would have on your own. Then, enjoying a coffee and scone or beer and chips around a table with the same individuals while trading stories about the trails or roads you've just ridden. Laughing about the one who fell because of "a pine cone". Or the fun of everyone going "wheee" down a decent.

    Riding in a group, whether it's 2 or 20 can be fun. As can riding alone. All things in moderation.
    You know what's ironic, family fun rides (Rotary Club etc) happen every couple of months and I enjoy going on those just to see the happy faces. The rides themselves are pretty slow...7mph max.
    None of my "coaches" have ever showed up to these!

  24. #24
    Endangered Serotta Rider Lacumo's Avatar
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    Trinidad and Tobago! Oooohhhhh..... Year-round cycling-friendly weather -- what a concept! I'm located 150 miles south of the Canadian border. Five months or so out of every year up here, the weather runs from challenging to inhospitable to downright prohibitive.

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    Senior Member volosong's Avatar
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    Have to admit that I haven't read all the responses. Will do so later today.

    On coaching . . . people are stupid. Only way to approach it is "in one ear, out the other". Give them a polite thanks and go on with your life. Not worth getting worked up about.

    On group riding . . . I rarely ride in a group. Only on the Saturday morning bike shop rides, which split into three ability levels and regroup later for an easy ride back to the shop. I usually ride alone for two reasons, 1) I don't want to hold up the other riders in the group, and 2) I don't want them to hold me up. Riding alone allows me to go at whatever speed I feel doing that day and also being able to stop as often and as long I want/need. I can also change the route to my liking while in the middle of a ride.

    Oh, I've quit rides before. I figure that I just bit off more than I can chew on that day. Later, when I'm more rested or in better physical shape, I'll do that particular ride again just to prove to myself that I can do it. Taking care of unfinished business.
    Deut 6:5

    ---

    "Ha ha! You fool! You fell victim to one of the classic blunders - The most famous of which is 'never get involved in a land war in Asia'".
    - Vizzini during his "battle of wits" with the Man in Black

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