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-   -   Bike trainer question...looking for opinions (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/914335-bike-trainer-question-looking-opinions.html)

mccardguy1 09-22-13 01:07 PM

Bike trainer question...looking for opinions
 
I live in Wisconsin which is a state where the winter weather is not very conducive to winter bike riding. I dont want to shut the riding down during these months but would love to continue using a bike trainer in my basement. Does anyone have any suggestions as to which trainer to buy?

A little background..I am now a 450 pound Clyde (down from 501 at the start of the summer) and have a sturdy steel mountain bike for a ride. Do bike trainers have weight limits (I assume yes)?

Looking for any and all suggestions.

Thanks

ClydesMoose 09-22-13 01:09 PM

Kurt Kinetic makes an awesome trainer. They have a couple of different modes, and if your bike can handle your weight, I think they can too. They're pretty damn sturdy.

skilsaw 09-22-13 02:29 PM

The Kurt Kinetic Road Machine will handle your weight.
I have the Kurt Kinetic Rock and Roll and it tops out at 250 lbs.

Kurt Kinetic trainers are great.
Particularly with the accessory fly-wheel.

sstorkel 09-22-13 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skilsaw (Post 16092792)
The Kurt Kinetic Road Machine will handle your weight.
I have the Kurt Kinetic Rock and Roll and it tops out at 250 lbs.

How do you like the Rock and Roll? I have a Kurt Kinetic Road Machine and it bores the heck out of me! I hate that the Road Machine feels nothing like a real bike and have been tempted to upgrade to the Rock and Roll; just not sure if it's a big difference from any other stationary trainer...

ahultin 09-22-13 03:40 PM

I have a Cycleops Fluid which is rated to #1200

JackoDandy 09-22-13 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ahultin (Post 16092977)
I have a Cycleops Fluid which is rated to #1200

Me too. Great trainer but v.boring :)

brianogilvie 09-22-13 04:22 PM

If you have the space and the cash, I'd suggest looking into rollers. TruTrainer rollers have a built-in flywheel resistance mechanism that effectively mimics the wind resistance you get by riding outside; other brands, such as Kreitler, offer resistance units as an add-on. I have TruTrainer rollers and am very happy with them, though in hindsight I wish I had bought the model that lets you disconnect the resistance.

I recommend rollers rather than a trainer for two reasons: the resistance is proportional to speed (at least with TruTrainer), so you can change resistance just by shifting gears, and riding rollers is less boring than a trainer, because you have to pay attention so as not to fall off. They really do teach you to hold your line.

Try before buying, though, if you decide to go with rollers. Some people find them hard to master.

mccardguy1 09-23-13 01:55 PM

Thanks for all the recomendations. I knew the board members here wouldnt let me down

indyfabz 09-23-13 03:01 PM

I find trainers mind-numbing. Have a diversion like music or TV. Also, a fan blowing on you helps. So does a towel or something to catch the sweat. Once upon a time you could buy a tailored terry cloth thingly that covered your headset and top tube to absorb the dripping sweat. Maybe this still make them.

JackoDandy 09-23-13 03:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 16096411)
Once upon a time you could buy a tailored terry cloth thingly that covered your headset and top tube to absorb the dripping sweat. Maybe this still make them.

Like this?
http://www.amazon.com/CycleOps-Bicyc.../dp/B000BTA6O0
I have one and it really works - stops your sweat from corroding your headset etc.

brawlo 09-23-13 06:20 PM

Working with intervals and other structured trainer session such as spinnervals and sufferfest will help the time pass while getting you a definite benefit to doing the work. Just getting on the trainer and ticking over the miles/time will get boring very quickly and won't really net you too much if any benefit.

I have a Kurt Kinetic and also some rollers that I use for training and moreso over our last winter which is just ending. My stuff is track focussed, so a little different, but I find it very hard to concentrate on sticking to the specific structure of my roller session as I also focus on purely keeping upright. It didn't take me too long to get the feel for the rollers, but I have a routing that gets me spinning at up to 130rpm for a minute, by working up in steps. I find it really hard to keep the focus on just staying on the rollers while also paying attention to keeping my rpm steady and high.

If you can, try some rollers and see how you go. Adjustable resistance rollers would be neat, but I would be very hesitant if you haven't used rollers before. A mag or fluid trainer would be the best bet, and unless you have specific reasons to get a higher end one, a lower spec model that is cheaper should suit most people's needs.

WonderMonkey 09-23-13 07:28 PM

I have a CycleOps Fluid 2 trainer sitting in the box, unopened. It arrived on Friday and we have had a death in the family, etc. and I've yet to get it out. If the OP would like I'll do an unpack so he/she can see what's in there.

jsigone 09-23-13 07:40 PM

rollers???

genejockey 09-23-13 10:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by indyfabz (Post 16096411)
I find trainers mind-numbing. Have a diversion like music or TV. Also, a fan blowing on you helps.

Mind-numbing is right. I can barely do 40 minutes on a trainer with loud, pumping music. It just takes so much concentration! Oh, yeah - and a fan.

Quote:

So does a towel or something to catch the sweat. Once upon a time you could buy a tailored terry cloth thingly that covered your headset and top tube to absorb the dripping sweat. Maybe this still make them.
You can get the same effect with an old T-shirt hooked over each side of the handlebars and velcroed to the top tube at the back.

fietsbob 09-24-13 01:40 PM

Stationary stands are notoriously hard on nice bikes,

stationary trainer that can be set up to resemble your real bike fit will be OK.

Theres these http://www.lemondfitness.com/product...mond-revmaster

there are some oodles cheaper of the style. use your 9/16" pedals and seat.

adjust seat angle and reach and height.
Sharing? a numbered scale will let 2 different people adjust 1 trainer to suit them ..



or of course the beater on the stand with rear wheel clamped in place will do,

get the set up adequate, and then the wear and tear on the real bike wont happen.

ill.clyde 09-24-13 02:13 PM

At your size, rollers would be a bad idea.

Get a good mag or fluid trainer, whatever your budget will allow. Consider looking for a used one on Craigslist.

Put a slick or smooth tire on the rear tire of your MTB and pedal all winter long.

Yes, they can be boring, however, music helps me. And I've been known to do 2 hour sessions on the trainer. Intervals definitely help during long sessions and they'll be good for you come next season. Definitely consider a fan. Otherwise you're just dripping sweat on the bike and below.

FWIW, I'm in WI too (Milwaukee, south side). This year rather than being inside I believe my trainer set up will be out in the garage, so I'm going to need a heater. I'm also contemplating pulling the trigger on Sufferfest or something similar. Laptop, speakers and my goals. I don't know ... I find winter trainer riding somewhat therapeutic. It beats sitting around idle all winter. But when spring begins to arrive, I get antsy and tire of the trainer.

rawhite1969 09-24-13 02:25 PM

bundle up, put on some studded tires, and go ride outside. Riding on the trainers suck. :)

JackoDandy 09-24-13 03:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rawhite1969 (Post 16099872)
bundle up, put on some studded tires, and go ride outside. Riding on the trainers suck. :)

I used to agree. However, after almost getting flattened on a dark 'quiet' road two winters ago I bought the CycleOps. I also bought some of the Sufferfest videos but though the video was somewhat entertaining the music was/is terrible. Lots of 'Indie' garage-band tracks that you've never heard of that get old and repetitive. I'd rather watch reruns of Family Guy or Breaking Bad instead. ;)

WonderMonkey 09-24-13 07:17 PM

Here is a video of a guy trying to learn to use rollers. While I am sure that you quickly get the hang of it I would throw this thing all the way through my garage door and set it on fire using some handy gasoline.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2tF0tK7P_s

brianogilvie 09-24-13 08:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WonderMonkey (Post 16100859)
Here is a video of a guy trying to learn to use rollers. While I am sure that you quickly get the hang of it I would throw this thing all the way through my garage door and set it on fire using some handy gasoline.

I think I slipped off my rollers maybe 4-6 times total in the first month of using them, and only once or twice in the 5 years since then. The thing is, you have no forward momentum, so you just fall sideways; as long as you have a soft surface and know how to fall, you should be OK. Some people recommend putting the rollers in an open door frame the first few times, so you have a support on both sides.

Looking down at the rollers or your front wheel is a bad idea. Best to look at a fixed object in the middle to long distance, and use your sense of balance to keep the bike straight.

JackoDandy 09-24-13 08:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WonderMonkey (Post 16100859)
Here is a video of a guy trying to learn to use rollers. While I am sure that you quickly get the hang of it I would throw this thing all the way through my garage door and set it on fire using some handy gasoline.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2tF0tK7P_s

Thanks - after watching that Im glad I went for the non-rollers, CycleOps Fluid ;)

2 wheeler 09-24-13 09:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WonderMonkey (Post 16100859)
Here is a video of a guy trying to learn to use rollers. While I am sure that you quickly get the hang of it I would throw this thing all the way through my garage door and set it on fire using some handy gasoline.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2tF0tK7P_s


Counterpoint:


WonderMonkey 09-24-13 09:42 PM

I have no doubt that once you get used to it you receive a very realistic-as-possible experience. I think getting to that point would result in lots of damage to me and my surrounding area.

floatsinwater 09-25-13 01:26 AM

I have the Kurt Kinetic Rock and Roll and do intervals by standing. Worth every penny. I don't find it boring since I'm doing intervals... though I suppose if you only ride a set speed the entire time it would get kind of boring?

sstorkel 09-25-13 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 2 wheeler (Post 16101184)
Counterpoint:


Just remember that those $850 E-Motion rollers aren't quite the same as your garden variety rollers...


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