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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 12-11-13, 12:22 PM   #1
bbeasley 
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Anybody else stand at their computer?

I'm a software developer and met up with a friend who is also a developer at Thanksgiving. He's been using a stand for his laptop so he can stand at work. I picked one up and started using it about a week ago. I quickly became aware that I'd lost the ability to stand for any length of time. I'm now up to 1 hour every other day and it's really working my lower leg muscles over. There's lots of chatter around the net about the benefits of doing this (probably put up by the stand makers ).

Anybody else have any experience with this?
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Old 12-11-13, 02:29 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by bbeasley View Post
I'm a software developer and met up with a friend who is also a developer at Thanksgiving. He's been using a stand for his laptop so he can stand at work. I picked one up and started using it about a week ago. I quickly became aware that I'd lost the ability to stand for any length of time. I'm now up to 1 hour every other day and it's really working my lower leg muscles over. There's lots of chatter around the net about the benefits of doing this (probably put up by the stand makers ).

Anybody else have any experience with this?

I wish I had the space, in fact my desk is too low so when my feet are flat my knees are above my hips and then my lower back starts to hurt. But with how small the company I work for is, and how the whole office set of cubicles is tied together, they won't be changing that for just me anytime soon.

I have thought about bringing in a stability ball to sit on though....
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Old 12-12-13, 04:05 AM   #3
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I can't stand at my computer, but I do get up frequently as even with a decent office chair I don't like sitting for an extended period. I have heard about using a stability ball as a chair at the computer and it sounds like a good idea for developing some extra core strength and balance.

Mike,
Can you raise your computer on top of your desk with some kind of stand so that you can raise your chair? Another possibility would be an ergonomic chair. You sit in kind of a semi-kneeling position. Seems odd at first but many people get back pain relief from them. It would solve your knee clearance issue.

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Old 12-12-13, 08:54 AM   #4
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I can't stand at my computer, but I do get up frequently as even with a decent office chair I don't like sitting for an extended period. I have heard about using a stability ball as a chair at the computer and it sounds like a good idea for developing some extra core strength and balance.

Mike,
Can you raise your computer on top of your desk with some kind of stand so that you can raise your chair? Another possibility would be an ergonomic chair. You sit in kind of a semi-kneeling position. Seems odd at first but many people get back pain relief from them. It would solve your knee clearance issue.




The problem is the chair wouldn't fit under the desk, so raising the computer would do no good for me. However I had forgotten about those ergo chairs, might be worth asking the HR folks who purchase our stuff to get me one.
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Old 12-12-13, 10:11 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
I wish I had the space, in fact my desk is too low so when my feet are flat my knees are above my hips and then my lower back starts to hurt. But with how small the company I work for is, and how the whole office set of cubicles is tied together, they won't be changing that for just me anytime soon.
Sounds like you need something like the Kangaroo Standing Desk. These, and other similar products, sit on top of your current desk and raise your monitor/keyboard/mouse to a height that allows standing. Personally, I'm not convinced that there's a huge benefit to standing. Treadmill desks on the other hand...
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Old 12-12-13, 11:59 AM   #6
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I'm using this one ~$50. I'm trying to build up to 3 hours standing/day. Once I'm there I'll see if I can tell any difference in my fitness/health.
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Old 12-18-13, 10:18 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
The problem is the chair wouldn't fit under the desk, so raising the computer would do no good for me. However I had forgotten about those ergo chairs, might be worth asking the HR folks who purchase our stuff to get me one.

If your hr dept won't buy one get it yourself and write the expense off as non-reimbursed business expense.

I work in a lab and try to stand as much as possible. I have folks ask me if I want a seat but I tell them I sat all the way here (sometimes that could be several hours to the customers location).
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Old 12-18-13, 11:01 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbeasley View Post
I'm a software developer and met up with a friend who is also a developer at Thanksgiving. He's been using a stand for his laptop so he can stand at work. I picked one up and started using it about a week ago. I quickly became aware that I'd lost the ability to stand for any length of time. I'm now up to 1 hour every other day and it's really working my lower leg muscles over. There's lots of chatter around the net about the benefits of doing this (probably put up by the stand makers ).

Anybody else have any experience with this?

I have a sit-stand desk. I raise it for conference calls or when I'm feeling a bit knackered, drop it to write documents. I killed my chair, so I've been using a stability ball for a couple of years now as well, since I'm too cheap to go buy a decent office chair.

(100% telecommuter, pretty much)

I like to be able to move around at the desk, and the ability to stand 'sometimes' is really useful. I'm also well into Clyde height territory, so I can set the desk up to be at least semi-ergonomic.
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Old 12-18-13, 10:35 PM   #9
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I work at home, so have some flexibility. I mostly sit, but try to stand for an hour or two, and treadmill for an hour or two. I was not sure I would like working while treadmilling, so rather than invest $1,500 on a treadmill work station, I fashioned one out of a plastic shelf for $25. Typing is a challenge, but OK for short e-mail replies, etc.
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Old 12-22-13, 06:03 PM   #10
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I do IT support from home and stand anywhere from 4 hours to the entire day. I set up my standing work station by putting a cardboard box on top of my file cabinet and then putting a piece of granite from a sink cutout top of that, I am comfortable with the setup and enjoy sitting down for lunch.
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Old 12-25-13, 01:49 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
I have thought about bringing in a stability ball to sit on though....
The problem is lack of movement, whether one is standing or sitting. Stability ball is a good option. I got one. I can move my lower back and hips whenever I want. My superiors look at it suspiciously and full of concerns. Chairs without a back and support for the forearms is not allowed according to the health and safety law. I it's a crazy. They only care about their butts, not about my health. Sitting in the same position for over 8 hours is a murder for the lower backs. I'm trying to take a short walks from time to time, but some corporate rats are talking that I'm hanging around and not working. I'm rather hardware engineer then software developer and my job does not require me to continuous sitting at a desk.
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Old 12-28-13, 10:41 AM   #12
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I have a co-worker who has back trouble and her therapist recommend she alternate sitting and standing throughout the day. Our company is VERY big into ergonomics and preventing workplace injuries, so she has a monitor arm that raises quite easily and a separate keyboard and mouse which sit on a plexiglass "shelf" to raise them to the appropriate height. It seems to help her a lot with the back pain.
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Old 12-31-13, 11:34 AM   #13
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Our plant manager uses a treadmill desk and decided each shift manager should have one too. Nice little setup - laptop and 2 extra monitors. If I could afford one I would too but use a stability at home.
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Old 02-25-14, 02:45 PM   #14
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I do IT support from home and stand anywhere from 4 hours to the entire day. I set up my standing work station by putting a cardboard box on top of my file cabinet and then putting a piece of granite from a sink cutout top of that, I am comfortable with the setup and enjoy sitting down for lunch.
I started with a similar set up - cardboard box on the desk for the keyboard and a shelf on the wall for the monitor; I've graduated to a drafting table that I've modified to work for me. One surface on the right is set at keyboard height while standing, and the surface to the right is set for use with a stool (with a back); the monitor is mounted on a swivel arm so I can use it at either position.

Or maybe you like to try this set up get a real desk LOL!
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Old 02-25-14, 08:13 PM   #15
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I work from home. I recently salvaged a desktop from a child's desk and placed it on top of a bookshelf next to my computer desk. Height is perfect and there is enough room for my laptop and a note book on the desk top. I unplug my laptop and use wifi to check/write email and peruse the interweb. I also read and write notes by hand at the stand-up desk. I split my time between sitting and standing. I do miss my monitor when I'm standing.

Being frugal (cheap) I wanted to try it before doing anything spendy. Not sure what my permanent solution will be. It does seem to be beneficial to the lower back discomfort from spending hours on the computer.

Lou
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Old 02-25-14, 08:16 PM   #16
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I work from home a lot and work from my laptop standing up most of the time.
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