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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 12-15-13, 04:21 PM   #1
henkelphoto
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Having trouble with keeping foot on pedal

Hi guys!

This is my first post. I'm just getting back into cycling after a many decade layoff. I'm 62 and weigh about 230, 5'7" tall or short, depending on your opinion I just purchased a Cannondale Trail 5. Right now, my wife and I are only riding on roadways and smooth gravel trails.

Here's my problem. I've got an artificial left knee. Due to the tendons being a bit tighter than the original, I can't get as much flex as I really need to pedal efficiently. This will change as I progress on my biking, but for now, my left foot keeps slipping forward until I'm pedaling on my heel. I can re-adjust my footing as I ride, but it's really inefficient.

I've tried riding with toe clips in the past and find them really dangerous for me, I can't seem to get my feet out of them very easily when I stop, so I'm not interested in using them. But I have never tried clipless shoes and pedals. I have no idea how easy it is to get in and out of them, and for that matter, if they would even work in my situation.

Any thoughts?

Jerry
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Old 12-15-13, 05:15 PM   #2
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I've used SPD and Look imitations, and both were able to be adjusted for ease of release. In fact, I need to tighten up my Look imitations, as it really is too easy to unclip. It really becomes second nature getting in and out. Still haven't perfected the trackstand, but alot of stops I don't have to put my foot down, so there's that as well.
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Old 12-15-13, 05:55 PM   #3
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I use double-sided pedals with SPD on one side and platform on the other. Adjust your SPD pedals to the lightest tension and get the multi-release SPD cleats. With this setup I've never had a failed clipout, even with an unexpected or panic stop as even the natural sidestep to put a foot down releases the cleat with only light pressure. The only natural foot motion that doesn't result in easy release is pedaling and I've never had an accidental clipout.
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Old 12-17-13, 10:50 AM   #4
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You might try something like Delta Bicycle Strapless Toeclips -- keeps your toes from sliding forward, but you're not strapped in.
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Old 12-17-13, 08:37 PM   #5
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I use Power Grips with some MKS Lambda pedals. I'm not sure if they will work for you but I like them enough to have them on both my bikes.
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Old 12-17-13, 10:09 PM   #6
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What you want are mini plastic toe clips,or half clips, like these on eBay

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trks...at=0&_from=R40

Essentially, they keep your foot from sliding forward but don't limit you when removing your foot from the pedal sideways. They work like gangbusters, they're cheap and virtually indestructible.
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Old 12-17-13, 10:35 PM   #7
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If you are scared of toeclips, you may be better off with a good set of BMX platform pedals. They will have a larger platform than your stockers and replacable metal pins that dig into your shoes and hold on.
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Old 12-18-13, 09:10 AM   #8
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I feel like you may have a few additional problems with the fake knee and the clipless pedals. I'm not sure how your range of motion is, but it requires a rotation outward with your ankle (and some knee twist) to get them to unclip. I'd say half clips like FrenchFit said. You won't get the efficiency of clips/straps or clipless, but it'll be better than your foot sliding off. It may help stretch out your knee a little too.
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Old 12-18-13, 09:27 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
What you want are mini plastic toe clips,or half clips, like these on eBay

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trks...at=0&_from=R40

Essentially, they keep your foot from sliding forward but don't limit you when removing your foot from the pedal sideways. They work like gangbusters, they're cheap and virtually indestructible.
I used similar before making the leap to clipless. Much better than just using a platform alone.
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Old 12-18-13, 10:53 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
I use double-sided pedals with SPD on one side and platform on the other. Adjust your SPD pedals to the lightest tension and get the multi-release SPD cleats. With this setup I've never had a failed clipout, even with an unexpected or panic stop as even the natural sidestep to put a foot down releases the cleat with only light pressure. The only natural foot motion that doesn't result in easy release is pedaling and I've never had an accidental clipout.

What dual sided pedals do you use? I want to get a set for my commuter once I get a new road bike. Basically I want to ride the commuter without cleats if I want, or throw them on and go to town. Haven't found a pedal that seems to have reputable quality or uses some weirdo cleat that isn't made for a road bike without going to the same pedals.
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Old 12-18-13, 01:50 PM   #11
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Try some good mountain bike/skate shoes like vans or 661. They have a sticky soft compound on the bottom with a stiff sole. Pair with a good quality flat pedal with steel pins. Should not slip. Some other good suggestions here as well.
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Old 12-18-13, 03:14 PM   #12
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As for shoes, after hearing everyone rave about FiveTen mountain biking shoes I recently got some FiveTen Freerider shoes and (even though I was a bit skeptical). I have to say, they stick to my MTB pedals (cheap Diamondback Sound with pins) more than I could have imagined, and have just the right amount of stiffness in the sole.
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Old 12-18-13, 04:37 PM   #13
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If you are scared of toeclips, you may be better off with a good set of BMX platform pedals. They will have a larger platform than your stockers and replacable metal pins that dig into your shoes and hold on.
Although I usually recommend a clipless system, I think with your limitations this is your best best. Buy a good shoe (the Five Ten mentioned above is exactly what I mean) that is meant for the pedal and you should have no problem. A number of my friends use these pedals with good result. One of my friends is scheduled for knee replacement and this is the only system that works for her.
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Old 12-18-13, 04:46 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henkelphoto View Post
Hi guys! This is my first post. I'm just getting back into cycling after a many decade layoff. I'm 62 and weigh about 230, 5'7" tall or short, depending on your opinion I just purchased a Cannondale Trail 5. Right now, my wife and I are only riding on roadways and smooth gravel trails. Here's my problem. I've got an artificial left knee. Due to the tendons being a bit tighter than the original, I can't get as much flex as I really need to pedal efficiently. This will change as I progress on my biking, but for now, my left foot keeps slipping forward until I'm pedaling on my heel. I can re-adjust my footing as I ride, but it's really inefficient. I've tried riding with toe clips in the past and find them really dangerous for me, I can't seem to get my feet out of them very easily when I stop, so I'm not interested in using them. But I have never tried clipless shoes and pedals. I have no idea how easy it is to get in and out of them, and for that matter, if they would even work in my situation. Any thoughts?

Jerry

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Old 12-18-13, 04:58 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by henkelphoto View Post
Hi guys!

This is my first post. I'm just getting back into cycling after a many decade layoff. I'm 62 and weigh about 230, 5'7" tall or short, depending on your opinion I just purchased a Cannondale Trail 5. Right now, my wife and I are only riding on roadways and smooth gravel trails.

Here's my problem. I've got an artificial left knee. Due to the tendons being a bit tighter than the original, I can't get as much flex as I really need to pedal efficiently. This will change as I progress on my biking, but for now, my left foot keeps slipping forward until I'm pedaling on my heel. I can re-adjust my footing as I ride, but it's really inefficient.

I've tried riding with toe clips in the past and find them really dangerous for me, I can't seem to get my feet out of them very easily when I stop, so I'm not interested in using them. But I have never tried clipless shoes and pedals. I have no idea how easy it is to get in and out of them, and for that matter, if they would even work in my situation.

Any thoughts?

Jerry
Post this question in the Adaptive Cycling forum as well, there may be potential solutions to your problem of which we're unaware. I use a pair of Crankbrothers 5050 pedals on my commuter and have been very impressed with them. They're platform pedals, wider than they are long, with a great grip no matter what type of shoe I wear.
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Old 12-18-13, 08:53 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
What dual sided pedals do you use? I want to get a set for my commuter once I get a new road bike. Basically I want to ride the commuter without cleats if I want, or throw them on and go to town. Haven't found a pedal that seems to have reputable quality or uses some weirdo cleat that isn't made for a road bike without going to the same pedals.
I have Shimano A530 pedals on my touring/commuter bike which has since turned gravel grinder. The A530 is a great touring/commuter pedal but can be a bit slick on the platform side if you have wet or muddy shoes or shoes without much grip. The PD-M324 might be better for slip resistance but might be a little less comfortable in street shoes. Either would work just fine for a commuter. Both use the SPD cleat system and I only own walkable MTB shoes that look a lot like regular athletic shoes. As long as you use the multi-position release cleat SH56 and set the retention on the pedals to a light setting, clipping out is almost instinctive, even in an emergency stop or if you have to put a foot down quick in squirrely conditions. Most shoes come with single release cleats, but it's an easy swap. I like walkable MTB shoes for several reasons: they are comfortable, they are easy to walk in, they look just like a standard athletic shoe so they don't look out of place with non-cycling clothing like I wear when commuting, touring, or pleasure riding. The only tell-tale that they aren't regular sports shoes is the slight click of the cleat when walking on hard surfaces like tile or concrete.



The multi-release SPD cleat, A530 pedals, PD-M324 pedal, and an example of a MTB shoe that looks like an athletic shoe.
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Old 12-18-13, 10:37 PM   #17
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Another vote for toe clips, and not using clipless. Like mentioned, the clipless may be a bit problematic. I tried 3 different clipless systems over the years.....always had hot spots or knee pain somewhere (even with a bike fitting).....gave up on trying anymore. Platform BMX pedals (almost exactly what 10 Wheels showed), and Keen Sandals.....couldn't be happier (except for the weird tan lines ).

We use a setup similar to what 10 Wheels posted (only plastic pedals/toe clips) on 4 bikes in our household. On each of my daughter's MTB bikes (elementary aged), and on the rear of 2 of our tandems (where the daughters stoker). We originally put the setup on the tandems to keep their feet on the pedals while my wife and I captained as we rode as a family (two tandems, one for me and a daughter, one for wife and a daughter). The girls liked them so much they wanted them on their MTB bikes (more urban commuter than MTB'ing so far).

Hope that helps! Let us know what ends up working.
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Old 12-21-13, 10:28 PM   #18
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I have to add my vote for SPD clipless pedals as well, many of them can be set to be really easy to step out of, while also keeping you feeling secure while on the bike. Highly recommended. I rode the dual SPD/platform for a while, and when I was wearing sneakers on the platform side, I kinda regretted it after having been clipped in for so may prior rides. You get used to it. Have yet in a year of using them to fail to unclip and fall all the way over.
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Old 12-21-13, 11:37 PM   #19
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+1, multiple release cleats, number 56. Work great.
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Old 12-23-13, 09:46 AM   #20
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Hi guys! Wow, what a bunch of responses!

Sorry I haven't been back on the site recently to reply, been busy with all the stuff for Christmas, work, etc. Clipless sounds like a bad idea at this time. And I've been out at the local bike shops with no luck trying to find shoes that will fit my wide feet. So, it looks like those little plastic clips are the bet option for me.

I did find an old pair of fabric hiking boots in the back of my closet with an extremely soft sole that has worked for the past week for me with the stock pedals. I'm thinking of trying that for a while and see how they do, but if they don't do the job, I think I'm going to go with those little plastic toe clips. Thanks Frenchfit!

And Grillparza, thanks for the suggestion to post in the adaptive forum, I've just been on here for a few visits and didn't even notice that forum till you mentioned it!

Jerry
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Old 12-23-13, 01:29 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by henkelphoto View Post
Hi guys!

This is my first post. I'm just getting back into cycling after a many decade layoff. I'm 62 and weigh about 230, 5'7" tall or short, depending on your opinion I just purchased a Cannondale Trail 5. Right now, my wife and I are only riding on roadways and smooth gravel trails.

Here's my problem. I've got an artificial left knee. Due to the tendons being a bit tighter than the original, I can't get as much flex as I really need to pedal efficiently. This will change as I progress on my biking, but for now, my left foot keeps slipping forward until I'm pedaling on my heel. I can re-adjust my footing as I ride, but it's really inefficient.

I've tried riding with toe clips in the past and find them really dangerous for me, I can't seem to get my feet out of them very easily when I stop, so I'm not interested in using them. But I have never tried clipless shoes and pedals. I have no idea how easy it is to get in and out of them, and for that matter, if they would even work in my situation.

Any thoughts?

Jerry
Consider these BMX pedals to solve your slipping problem without tying your feet to the pedals (a really bad idea).

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_549650_-1___

I use a earlier model of this pedal on all my biked find that they work very well with my knee implants.
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Old 12-28-13, 06:28 PM   #22
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I have two replaced knees. I tried spd pedals for a time but had trouble with getting out of them. I went to flat pedals with the built in replaceable spikes and wear a pair of Doc Martin airs. the soles on the shoes are spongy and the spikey pedals dig right in. I can reposition my foot to accommodate my knee preference.

I ride 20+ miles 3-4 days a week (commute) with longer on weekend. The riding helps limber up the knees and I have nothing but praise for switching to flats.

I'm not really a high cadence person but not really a masher either.
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Old 12-28-13, 11:06 PM   #23
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I feel like you may have a few additional problems with the fake knee and the clipless pedals. I'm not sure how your range of motion is, but it requires a rotation outward with your ankle (and some knee twist) to get them to unclip. I'd say half clips like FrenchFit said. You won't get the efficiency of clips/straps or clipless, but it'll be better than your foot sliding off. It may help stretch out your knee a little too.
I have a fake knee and have not had any problem ast all with clipless pedals.
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Old 12-28-13, 11:20 PM   #24
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Crank Brothers pedals, either their mallet or candy model would give plenty of confidence.... I personally like the Mallet for working with any kind of shoe, but a SPD compatible shoe would be optimal

http://cart.crankbrothers.com/pedals/candy-1.html
http://cart.crankbrothers.com/pedals/mallet-1.html
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Old 12-29-13, 04:09 PM   #25
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Have you considered getting shorter cranks to accommodate your range-of-motion limitations?
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