Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 197
  1. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,025
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    I used to love Gatorskins, but I think they top out at 28's...
    Grab a set of Vittoria Randonneur Pro or Voyager Hyper tires in 700x32 or 700x35. They're pretty light and very fast for a high-volume tire. They make my touring bike feel darn near as quick as my road bike! Both tires provide good puncture protection, though in my experience the Pro is a bit better in this regard.

  2. #27
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    climbed onto the trainer and got a reality check.

    Looks like I'll need to prepare prior to the "new century" interval protocol.

    First run at it, mostly an equipment test, well, did all out 1 minute bursts with 5 minute rests for 5 sets and well, made it to all of 30 minutes.

    Next try, 3 intervals of 5 minutes w 8 minutes rest and called it at 40... Hard to get HR up to 140, and would not recover below 110's in the 8 minutes rest. Also after interval it was hard to return to cadence of 75-80 on rest period, kept drifting back up... Interestingly, I can feel it in my legs, but feel better than I have all week!

    I will try 4x5 next week and hold out for 60 minutes, do that for 2 weeks and see how it feels.

    I figure all progress will make the ride more enjoyable, even if I'd rather be further along already.

  3. #28
    Senior Member Cycle Babble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    1996 Trek 820 Mountain Bike, 2010 Gary Fisher Tarpon, 2013 Trek Domane 4.5C
    Posts
    164
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Null66.
    Keep up the good work. I plan on riding the MS 150 this summer and with temperautres in the teens for the next week I am stuck with riding on the spinner at the gym. I have been going 4 days a week and each time I increase my speed and difficulty by a small amount. This seems to help my conditioning considerably to the point that I can now go two days in a row without suffering muscle strain or decreased output.

    Thanks,
    John S

  4. #29
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Distance: 8.75 mi
    Time: 40:25
    Avg Speed: 13.0 mph
    Elevation Gain: 13 ft
    Calories: 348 C
    Avg Temperature: 69.1 F
    Details
    Timing
    Elevation
    Elevation Gain: 13 ft
    Elevation Loss: 0 ft
    Min Elevation: 0 ft
    Max Elevation: 14 ft
    Heart Rate
    Avg HR: 122 bpm
    Max HR: 141 bpm
    Zones% of Maxbpm
    Cadence
    Avg Bike Cadence: 81 rpm
    Max Bike Cadence: 99 rpm
    Temperature
    Avg Temperature: 69.1 F
    Min Temperature: 66.2 F
    Max Temperature: 69.8 F

  5. #30
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle Babble View Post
    Null66.
    Keep up the good work. I plan on riding the MS 150 this summer and with temperautres in the teens for the next week I am stuck with riding on the spinner at the gym. I have been going 4 days a week and each time I increase my speed and difficulty by a small amount. This seems to help my conditioning considerably to the point that I can now go two days in a row without suffering muscle strain or decreased output.

    Thanks,
    John S
    John,
    How much time on the spinner?
    Are you able to collect metrics?

    I tried one a coupe weeks ago, didn't realize they were fixed as opposed to single speed and jammed my bum knee a bit. That convinced me to order the trainer. Gotta hand it to people in the spinning classes!


    What's the terrain for the MS150? Hilly?
    I did one in Central NY in the 90's and it went through wine country. We kept pace with this little dude and his Dad, maybe 5 on a single speed. Damn that little guy was impressive. I think he was riding for his mother...

    The reality check is humbling, not that I am surprised. I'm slow, think ice cream touring speed, 10-12 mph. I have always been a pulse and coast, though made progress breaking that this year! A trainer hits my all my weaknesses! On the road I have developed a number of "cheats" that make the most of what I can put out. They do not apply on the constant demand of a trainer. I'm convinced that this is exactly what I need from riding and health perspectives.

  6. #31
    Senior Member adrien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rockhopper comp, Kona Kapu, Ira Ryan custom road bike, Ira Ryan custom fixed gear
    Posts
    1,006
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great project. I'll add a few things I haven't seen much of here yet.

    1. Fuel -- not just how many calories, but what. I used to feel awful after anything over 60 miles. Went to see my doctor. Bottom line for me: salt. I am a salty sweater, and I really needed electrolytes. I get them in water tabs, mostly.

    2. Core -- don't neglect your core. The stronger it is, the less you are relying on your behind, your arms, and your feet to hold your bike straight. With a strong core you can alleviate a lot of the pressure on those points, which you will feel about mile 80+. I'd suggest adding a core routine to your training.

    3. Fit, fit, fit. Anything even slightly off will really become difficult with that much time on the bike

    I did it twice -- on a road bike, with buddies, food stops and the like. Great fun.
    "how do you know you can't swim until you have drowned?"

  7. #32
    Senior Member Pakiwi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    188
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by adrien View Post
    Great project. I'll add a few things I haven't seen much of here yet.

    1. Fuel -- not just how many calories, but what. I used to feel awful after anything over 60 miles. Went to see my doctor. Bottom line for me: salt. I am a salty sweater, and I really needed electrolytes. I get them in water tabs, mostly.

    2. Core -- don't neglect your core. The stronger it is, the less you are relying on your behind, your arms, and your feet to hold your bike straight. With a strong core you can alleviate a lot of the pressure on those points, which you will feel about mile 80+. I'd suggest adding a core routine to your training.

    3. Fit, fit, fit. Anything even slightly off will really become difficult with that much time on the bike

    I did it twice -- on a road bike, with buddies, food stops and the like. Great fun.
    Adrien,
    i have to ask. How did the Dr find out you are a salty sweater. I know if the sweat dries nome, I can feel the salt on brow. I guessed it was normal.
    i second the fit. If your not comfortable it will hamper your training and the big rides.
    I have a couple of centuries planned this year after many years off cycling. The hardest thing for me was finding my pace. I wNt a good time but not be miserable. When I did three centuries in three days the first day I went to slow. Stopped at every stop. By day three I hammered it from the 50 mile mark after a good effort and stopped only when I needed to fill up my water bottles
    Allan

  8. #33
    Commuter & cyclotourist brianogilvie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Hadley, MA, USA
    My Bikes
    Boulder All Road, Surly Long Haul Trucker, Bike Friday New World Tourist, Breezer Uptown 8, Bike Friday Express Tikit, Trek MultiTrack 730 (Problem? No, I don't have a problem)
    Posts
    493
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I was training for my first (and so far only) 200K ride, back in spring 2010, I used the method that I used when training for a 25K run: every weekend I did a long slow ride that was 10 miles longer than the previous week, up to 80 miles. I then took a week off and cycled a century two weeks before the 200K. I was also commuting (6-mile round trip) and doing intervals a couple times a week. I rode as much as possible in the terrain of the 200K route (which had the advantage of passing fairly close to my house, only about 8 miles west).

    Building up endurance by increasingly long rides was immensely helpful. I also learned what nutrition worked for me, and what didn't; how often I needed to hydrate; and what I needed to tweak on my bike in order to be comfortable after 8-10 hours.

    At the time I weighed around 210 lbs. and was riding a Surly Long Haul Trucker with a set of light touring wheels from Peter J. White, and Panaracer Pasela 35-622 tires (non-tourguard). The Paselas are a nice supple tire and very good value for money; they made the bike noticeably faster than the stock Conti Contacts.

    I couldn't do the brevet for which I had registered because I hurt my leg getting out of bed a few days before, but I rode 200K, mostly on the brevet route, the following weekend. I wasn't very fast, but I finished well before what would have been the cutoff time.

    Last year I did a century in June, D2R2 (the 100K version, plenty for me!) in August, and the 170K Great River Ride populaire in October (really 179K). My long rides weren't nearly as systematic as in 2010; I did a metric century in late April, which was my longest ride before the 100 Miles of Nowhere in early June. Before D2R2 I did a bunch of 35-50 mile hilly rides, with a little bit of dirt. The week after D2R2 I did a flatter 80-mile ride, but after that, nothing longer than 35 miles before the GRR, due to the demands of work. I did find that my Berthoud saddle, which was comfortable up to 80 miles, was less so after about 95. I had done the Time Crunched Cyclist century training plan last winter and spring, which helped my speed, but I did miss the regular long rides for reacquainting myself with my nutritional and comfort needs. I'm fairly sure that if I hadn't had the earlier experience building up to 200K, I would have done much worse in my long-distance events last year.

    tl;dr: weekly long, slow rides, building up to a century shortly before the event, will greatly improve endurance and teach you much that's useful for riding a 200K.
    Public accountability: my Beeminder weight loss graph.

  9. #34
    Senior Member adrien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rockhopper comp, Kona Kapu, Ira Ryan custom road bike, Ira Ryan custom fixed gear
    Posts
    1,006
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pakiwi View Post
    Adrien,
    i have to ask. How did the Dr find out you are a salty sweater. I know if the sweat dries nome, I can feel the salt on brow. I guessed it was normal.
    i second the fit. If your not comfortable it will hamper your training and the big rides.
    I have a couple of centuries planned this year after many years off cycling. The hardest thing for me was finding my pace. I wNt a good time but not be miserable. When I did three centuries in three days the first day I went to slow. Stopped at every stop. By day three I hammered it from the 50 mile mark after a good effort and stopped only when I needed to fill up my water bottles
    Allan
    More trial and error than anything. He's a runner, and he asked how much salt staining there was on my clothing afterwards. After a long ride, my clothes have salt rings, and my face is gritty to the touch. He suggested that I try more sports drinks and less straight water. I tried a tube of Nuun tabs, and that was it. Issue gone. Now, I order them by the case from Amazon.
    "how do you know you can't swim until you have drowned?"

  10. #35
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some people do sweat more than others but I don't think I've ever heard the term "salty sweater." For some reason that made me chuckle. I've left salt stains on shorts and jersey's before too but not all the time. It's usually temperature and humidity dependent. Electrolyte replacement is important. Nuun's work as to E-caps and a number of other products. Drinking straight water in excess can lead to hyponatremia which is a nasty thing. I've been there but not on a ride as short as a 200k.

    Null66, you definitely need to loose the habit of "pulse and coast." That's not so good. If your work on the trainer doesn't break that habit you might want to do some self analysis to find out why you are doing that. It could be fit, fitness or just in your head. Even when you are tired you should have a continuous pedal stroke. Have you thought about what you are going to do for food yet?
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  11. #36
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Pulse and coast.

    Started when I was a kid...
    I played line in football and defense in Hockey. Lot's of torque, not much spin... So I favored rather tall gearing and low cadence.

    I have always known it was a liability. I have worked on it, especially now that there's hills everywhere I ride. Now as much to avoid numb feet as anything. I can hold, 75-80 for quite a while, but my time >90 is quite limited.


    Food: Well in the pack on our weekend rides are the customary: bananas, apples, fig newtons, and dried fruit and nuts... I also use Perpetuuem. Thinking of making my own MaltoDextrin mix to cut the cost.

    The commute (weather tolerance permitting) I do is 25 miles in the very early am. Getting something to eat and out the door in time has been an issue... I found that Perpetuuem and Protein drink powder worked better then just the Perpetuuem. I think it is because the other simple carbs from the protein powder add to the total calories per hour you can process. Or it could be something simple like it tasting better.

    My SO uses diluted Gatorade but likes the idea of diluted Orange Juice. Her fueling is more of an issue on long rides. She's bonked to the point of falling a couple times last year and the year before. This has resulted in 2 rather NASTY big ring bites. I found that she'll not turn down Buggles when riding, so that's something. She notes sick, sloshy feeling which I'm, interpreting as a need to attend to osmotic pressures...

    Being uh, well padded, I have troubles with cooling. Staying hydrated has been critical and my main challenge, even with a camelback... I'm thinking I need to attend to the electrolytes/salts to balance out the water...

    A further challenge is I recently recognized that I have gout... Fortunately there is this Dr. Sims, Osmo stuff http://osmonutrition.com/ that also buffers the build up of acids in the blood for performance reasons, but should apply to helping with gout and how it flairs up when I ride... using sodium bicarb instead of sodium chloride may help. Will try on a longish ride first...

  12. #37
    Senior Member adrien's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Rockhopper comp, Kona Kapu, Ira Ryan custom road bike, Ira Ryan custom fixed gear
    Posts
    1,006
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post

    Null66, you definitely need to loose the habit of "pulse and coast." That's not so good. If your work on the trainer doesn't break that habit you might want to do some self analysis to find out why you are doing that. It could be fit, fitness or just in your head. Even when you are tired you should have a continuous pedal stroke. Have you thought about what you are going to do for food yet?
    A fixie will fix that...
    "how do you know you can't swim until you have drowned?"

  13. #38
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Intervals went better...
    Backed off from a couple gears made it full hour and 5 intervals!!!
    Heart rate was elevated before I started likely due to today's lift...

    Summary
    Distance: 14.14 mi
    Time: 1:05:07
    Avg Speed: 13.0 mph
    Elevation Gain: 0 ft
    Calories: 587 C
    Avg Temperature: 69.6 F
    Details
    Timing
    Elevation
    Elevation Gain: 0 ft
    Elevation Loss: 39 ft
    Min Elevation: 291 ft
    Max Elevation: 331 ft
    Heart Rate
    Avg HR: 128 bpm
    Max HR: 149 bpm
    Zones% of Maxbpm
    Cadence
    Avg Bike Cadence: 78 rpm
    Max Bike Cadence: 101 rpm

  14. #39
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by adrien View Post
    A fixie will fix that...
    Yeah it will, and ruin your knees as an added benefit.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  15. #40
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    Pulse and coast.

    Started when I was a kid...
    I played line in football and defense in Hockey. Lot's of torque, not much spin... So I favored rather tall gearing and low cadence.

    I have always known it was a liability. I have worked on it, especially now that there's hills everywhere I ride. Now as much to avoid numb feet as anything. I can hold, 75-80 for quite a while, but my time >90 is quite limited.
    Don't let yourself get too hung up on cadence. Everyone's physiology is different and your optimal cadence will be different than someone else. Think of it as a tool that can do different things. I run a really big gear range, usually a 33/42/60 with a 11-25 or 11-28cassette depending on what I'm doing. I run the big gears because I am a bit of a masher too. When I'm climbing though I like to keep the revs up high. When I'm in the flats or slight downhills I'll put it in the 60-11 and use a different muscle group to recover as I lope along at 60rpm or less.
    The numb feet is a fit issue. Are your shoes snug or loose, do you use cleats, if so, what kind and what position are they in on your shoe?


    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    Food: Well in the pack on our weekend rides are the customary: bananas, apples, fig newtons, and dried fruit and nuts... I also use Perpetuuem. Thinking of making my own MaltoDextrin mix to cut the cost....
    That actually sounds pretty good. The only issue with the solid food is the space it takes up having to carry it. If you can get it along the way great. Just keep in mind (this goes for the little woman too) that you want to keep the calorie (quality calories) to around 250-350cal/hr. You get under that and you risk running into a deficit which your SO found out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    The commute (weather tolerance permitting) I do is 25 miles in the very early am...
    Just a thought, when I used to commute it was about 22 miles one way. I'd ride straight in in the morning then take the long way home. Increasing the miles to 40-50.

    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    My SO uses diluted Gatorade but likes the idea of diluted Orange Juice. ...Being uh, well padded, I have troubles with cooling. Staying hydrated has been critical and my main challenge, even with a camelback... I'm thinking I need to attend to the electrolytes/salts to balance out the water...
    I find Gatorade too sweet but I can handle it diluted too. I like Powerade better. I've used orange juice before but it is sticky! You might want to try some E-caps or Nuuns. They'll definitely help.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  16. #41
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Escondido>>>>San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    smashed Supersix
    Posts
    6,842
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    Yeah it will, and ruin your knees as an added benefit.
    better reason I prefer my singlespeed, I can still coast oppose to spin 140+ RPM down hills.

  17. #42
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    No doubt!, I used to have my Peugeot set up as a single speed. It didn't really do much for me and I never saw the fascination with it. Unfortunately having a freewheel wouldn't help trudging up some of the grades around here.
    Last edited by Homeyba; 01-27-14 at 10:58 PM.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  18. #43
    Senior Member Cycle Babble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    1996 Trek 820 Mountain Bike, 2010 Gary Fisher Tarpon, 2013 Trek Domane 4.5C
    Posts
    164
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    John,
    How much time on the spinner?
    Are you able to collect metrics?

    I tried one a coupe weeks ago, didn't realize they were fixed as opposed to single speed and jammed my bum knee a bit. That convinced me to order the trainer. Gotta hand it to people in the spinning classes!


    What's the terrain for the MS150? Hilly?
    Gym:
    I have been biking for many years, but this is the first year I am focusing on training for bike riding at the gym during the winter months. My hope is to start the spring doing 20 miles at a crack instead of starting with shorter rides and working up to the longer ones like I used to. The gym I belong to is Planet Fitness, they have their machines set up to allow only 70 minutes at a time (I suppose to keep people from tying up one machine all day). I do the maximum amount of time each time. I cannot get the data for you because it has no way to record it that I know of. I started on a manual setting and increased the drag (strength setting) by one point each day. After a few weeks of this I switched to a hill setting and started at a low setting of 8 and worked up to 10. When I feel like changing things up a bit I would switch strength settings on the hill setting to try to mimick shifting gears and focus on keeping my cadence at 90 for the entire ride. This also helps it from being a total bore. Having TV screens in front of me along with a cute fanny walking by from time to time also helps limit the boredom....but that is a topic for another day. I have noticed a steady slow improvement and will continue this training through the next few months until weather allows me to ride outside. Time will tell if this training pays any dividends.

    MS150 hilly?
    I cannot answer that for sure since this will be the first time I am riding it. I live in SE Wisconsin which is the southern half of the Kettle Moraines. I will be riding with my uncle and a few of his riding friends who have done this multiple times. My hope is to be able to keep up.

    Last year I mapped out multiple trails that offer both flat and hilly rides. I do this for multiple obvious reasons. Towards the end of the year I was doing 25 miles on both Saturday and Sunday so I think the two 75 mile days on the MS this year is most certainly acheivable. My average speed on the MTB was 10-12MPH which I need to improve. With my new road bike I will be focusing on cadence and long rides this spring until I am confident the MS 150 will not be an issue. Losing a few extra pounds during the process will be a bonus.

    Will keep you posted on my progress.

    Thanks,
    John S

  19. #44
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    Yeah it will, and ruin your knees as an added benefit.

    I tried a "spin" bike at the gym, didn't realize it was fixed.
    Walked funny for the rest of the day as I went to coast and it jammed my bum knee...
    Don't see how people do it. I remember a long ride near NC state my SO and I was on and this college kid on a NICE mountain bike set up as a fixie just flew up a 10%+ hill... Admittedly, our legs already had 50+ in them but still...




    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    Some people do sweat more than others but I don't think I've ever heard the term "salty sweater." For some reason that made me chuckle. I've left salt stains on shorts and jersey's before too but not all the time. It's usually temperature and humidity dependent. Electrolyte replacement is important. Nuun's work as to E-caps and a number of other products. Drinking straight water in excess can lead to hyponatremia which is a nasty thing. I've been there but not on a ride as short as a 200k.


    Null66, you definitely need to loose the habit of "pulse and coast." That's not so good. If your work on the trainer doesn't break that habit you might want to do some self analysis to find out why you are doing that. It could be fit, fitness or just in your head. Even when you are tired you should have a continuous pedal stroke. Have you thought about what you are going to do for food yet?
    The salt comments are interesting and exlain something. I noticed my SO exudes far more salt when she sweats. I found it hard to understand as she eats far better then and I and gets a lot less salt in her diet... So minor mystery there explained. I have been encouraging salty-ish foods for her (and me) on long/hot rides as a result but still quite odd. I see from other readings that electrolytes other then salt are very important...


    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    Don't let yourself get too hung up on cadence. Everyone's physiology is different and your optimal cadence will be different than someone else. Think of it as a tool that can do different things. I run a really big gear range, usually a 33/42/60 with a 11-25 or 11-28cassette depending on what I'm doing. I run the big gears because I am a bit of a masher too. When I'm climbing though I like to keep the revs up high. When I'm in the flats or slight downhills I'll put it in the 60-11 and use a different muscle group to recover as I lope along at 60rpm or less.
    The numb feet is a fit issue. Are your shoes snug or loose, do you use cleats, if so, what kind and what position are they in on your shoe?








    That actually sounds pretty good. The only issue with the solid food is the space it takes up having to carry it. If you can get it along the way great. Just keep in mind (this goes for the little woman too) that you want to keep the calorie (quality calories) to around 250-350cal/hr. You get under that and you risk running into a deficit which your SO found out.






    Just a thought, when I used to commute it was about 22 miles one way. I'd ride straight in in the morning then take the long way home. Increasing the miles to 40-50.






    I find Gatorade too sweet but I can handle it diluted too. I like Powerade better. I've used orange juice before but it is sticky! You might want to try some E-caps or Nuuns. They'll definitely help.

    Numb Feet, bicycle shoes (Keen Sandals) mostly fixed that... Well, that and not mashing as much...


    Solid food I use a topeak pack with extendable saddlebags, so far space hasn't been an issue. Weight, on the other hand, but that isd mostly me.


    Cadence: I find the more I ride the better I can hold various cadences. I tend to have 2 sweet spots, about 75 and about 85 when my condition is acceptable. Previously, I just used the more and more miles approach to recovering some fitness. This year I would like to up my game to a whole different level. The early brevet is something I would like to do, but it's main benefit is the enforced discipline so that the better I train the more enjoyable the ride will be. Since data supports intervals, intervals it is. Time crunched I am, so Time crunched it is... THough I've turned down the intensity to be achievable.

  20. #45
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Summary
    Distance: 12.48 mi
    Time: 1:00:22
    Avg Speed: 12.4 mph
    Elevation Gain: 26 ft
    Calories: 515 C
    Avg Temperature: 70.0 F
    Details
    Timing
    Elevation
    Elevation Gain: 26 ft
    Elevation Loss: 23 ft
    Min Elevation: 15 ft
    Max Elevation: 28 ft
    Heart Rate
    Avg HR: 125 bpm
    Max HR: 144 bpm
    Zones% of Maxbpm
    Cadence
    Avg Bike Cadence: 76 rpm
    Max Bike Cadence: 101 rpm
    Temperature
    Avg Temperature: 70.0 F
    Min Temperature: 69.8 F
    Max Temperature: 71.6 F

  21. #46
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Escondido>>>>San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    smashed Supersix
    Posts
    6,842
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    how are you measure your elevation gain?

  22. #47
    Senior Member Homeyba's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Coast, California
    My Bikes
    Colnago C-50, Calfee Dragonfly Tandem, Specialized Allez Pro, Peugeot Competition Light
    Posts
    3,370
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    Numb Feet, bicycle shoes (Keen Sandals) mostly fixed that... Well, that and not mashing as much...
    I'm not a big fan of sandals. You might want to scoot your back towards your heal. That is a pretty common fix with long distance riders. Most of us have them cranked as far back as they will go and I know some who have resorted to drilling holes further back. Whatever you do, don't make big changes at one time. Better to make incremental changes and see how it goes.


    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    Solid food I use a topeak pack with extendable saddlebags, so far space hasn't been an issue. Weight, on the other hand, but that isd mostly me...
    While most of the weight is on the body that doesn't mean that you want to pack it on the bike too. Weight isn't an issue if you can go fast enough to get to the finish comfortably in the time limit but if you are not then loosing weight off the bike is a simple, fast and easy way to speed yourself up a bit. Especially if the coarse is not flat.
    It doesn't get harder, you just go slower.

  23. #48
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
    how are you measure your elevation gain?

    Garmin 500
    after upload
    set to correct elevation but still presume limited accuracy.


    Quote Originally Posted by Homeyba View Post
    I'm not a big fan of sandals. You might want to scoot your back towards your heal. That is a pretty common fix with long distance riders. Most of us have them cranked as far back as they will go and I know some who have resorted to drilling holes further back. Whatever you do, don't make big changes at one time. Better to make incremental changes and see how it goes.






    While most of the weight is on the body that doesn't mean that you want to pack it on the bike too. Weight isn't an issue if you can go fast enough to get to the finish comfortably in the time limit but if you are not then loosing weight off the bike is a simple, fast and easy way to speed yourself up a bit. Especially if the coarse is not flat.



    Interesting idea on drilling different point on the sandals! I use sandals as they are very cooling on hot days, provided you don't forget the sunscreen!


    I can get at least a kilo off the bike by swapping out the rear tire M+ and pulling off the kickstand. I think my rear M+ has very high rolling resistance. My front is a standard Marathon 420 38 so another 1/4 lb on that, but it's rolling resistance seems decent. I'm thinking of using my old velcro pack instead of topeak (it has more then enough space) and this could save a pound or 2... Trimming tools and spares down will help maybe another half lb. so bike from 35.5 to >33 and pack down maybe total of 3... all in all 20% reduction...


    The intervals have been a lesson in humility! But what matters is that I stick with the program and improve it as learning and fitness permits. However, the reality check does convince me that I need to drastically improve my fitness for health reasons. I'm going to maintain the attitude that proper preparation will make the brevet more enjoyable for longer but baring major failure or serious accident I will make it even if it takes all night...

  24. #49
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Escondido>>>>San Diego, CA
    My Bikes
    smashed Supersix
    Posts
    6,842
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    Garmin 500
    after upload
    set to correct elevation but still presume limited accuracy.
    They are pretty accurate. Was just wondering cuz your rides are super duper flat!! Any plans to hit the hills soon? Going from 25ft to 7000ft will be a jaw dropper......

  25. #50
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,137
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jsigone View Post
    They are pretty accurate. Was just wondering cuz your rides are super duper flat!! Any plans to hit the hills soon? Going from 25ft to 7000ft will be a jaw dropper......
    Oh, that!
    These are trainer rides... No gain at all. Though they say they set the resistance on the Kurt fluid trainer.

    http://www.kurtkinetic.com/powercurve.php

    "With Tom’s help, we have been able to create an “average” rider assumed to be 165 lbs, riding a 23 lb bike with 170mm crank arms up a 1% grade, at sea level with no wind on rough asphalt... etc. "

    So I'm a LOT heavier as is my bike, so the resistance is somewhere around .5%....

    My once weekly commutes were 50 rt with 1900 feet...
    Our weekend rides are usually in hilly areas, HillsBorough nc, Chapel Hill, Fork Oaks... SO outside a lot of hills, but 7800 feet of climb in a day is, well, intimidating...

    These are on hold until the weather warms up enough for my gear to be sufficient to protect my gout...

Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •