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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 01-26-14, 08:56 PM   #1
OmegaGator
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Right bike for me question

Hello,

I am looking to buy a bike to ride to work, roughly 11km each way, I haven't ridden in probably 8+ years. I 6'7 with a 36inch inseam and probably ~360lbs, I've done some reading on bikes for big guys and I think I have found a great bike. http://toronto.en.craigslist.ca/tor/bik/4261845980.html It's a 46cm and made of "1530 high tensile steel", this is what the seller told me, I don't know if that's good though . I'd like to know if this would be suitable for my needs. Is there anything I should be worried about or looking to upgrade? I'm assuming I'll have to upgrade the tires, they are only 36 spokes. I also don't know if CCM is a good brand.

Any input would be great, thank you!

Last edited by OmegaGator; 01-27-14 at 10:13 AM. Reason: wrong unit
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Old 01-26-14, 09:33 PM   #2
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You have a typo... I think a 64cm is probably in the ballpark for you though unless you really have a 36cm inseam. I presume you meant inches. Actually, the way to measure your inseam for cycling is to stand up against a wall, jam a book between your legs as high as you can without undue pressure and measure to the top of that. it should be a larger number than your pants inseam. 27in rims are old but you should still be able to find tires & tubes for them. Friction shifters are also old-school but they are much easier to maintain and keep working correctly. If it's in good shape that looks like a great deal for you.

DO get somebody capable to go over the wheels for you before you do a lot of riding - you want somebody to check & even out the spoke tension (not just true them) because at 350# you'll be putting some strain on those things.

OK, enough hassling you for typos... Welcome to Bike Forums. There are plenty of people here who are large and cycle tons of miles a year, you're in good company.
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Old 01-26-14, 11:20 PM   #3
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that bike is indeed a 64 cm. Based on the crank, shifters, and suicide brake levers im going to say it was a low end mass produced bike. I doubt it was $175 when new let alone now. 27 inch wheels are not really used anymore, they have been replaced by 700c. You can still find tubes and tires just not as easily.

with all that said it appears to be in great shape. handlebar tape and tires look fine and it is ready to jump on it and ride.

if you go check it out spin the wheels and look for wobble. turn the cranks and feel for clicking or sticking. Same thing while turning the handlebars. check the brake pads...as trojanhorse said you'll probably want to bring your wheels to the lbs and have them check them out, retension and true.

I would start at $125 and see if he'll bite. $150 would be my max.
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Old 01-27-14, 06:10 AM   #4
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You have a typo... unless you really have a 36cm inseam.
Nah, he's just our local weather man on the news with the 1-2 inch forecast while I'm out clearing 8 inches off the car, then another 4 inches off the car, and this morning clearing another 3 inches.
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Old 01-27-14, 10:26 AM   #5
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Ha, yes, I did have a typo, thanks for spotting it. I'll re-measure my inseam using that method today. I was thinking I was going to have to buy new rims anyway to be better for my weight. I just have to do more research on what size and spoke count.

If I go to look at the bike I'll keep that stuff in mind. I may just keep looking for a better built bike, I have no problem spending more for a better built bike. With my size if it's not built well it'll break

I may also look for a mountain bike type instead as well to start, I have never ridden a road bike. Alot of people say those are the way to go for us bigger folk.

Last edited by OmegaGator; 01-27-14 at 10:30 AM.
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Old 01-27-14, 01:37 PM   #6
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If you want a mountain bike, get a steel-framed hard tail, no front suspension model from the 90s or so. Used would be a great way to go and indeed, those are sturdy bikes.
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Old 01-27-14, 03:05 PM   #7
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"Hi Ten" is ordinary carbon steel. Nothing really wrong with it, though it is not "high end" as this poster seems to be implying. This bike is fine, though that price definitely has to be negotiable. A hundred bucks is about right.
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Old 01-27-14, 03:17 PM   #8
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Uh, beware of steel wheels!
My 27' had steel wheels.

Strong sure, but chromed braking surfaces suck in the rain!
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Old 01-27-14, 04:33 PM   #9
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If you want a mountain bike, get a steel-framed hard tail, no front suspension model from the 90s or so. Used would be a great way to go and indeed, those are sturdy bikes.
I will be taking a look for them. Just abit harder to find the proper one with the height and weight. I should be looking for a 64cm framed mountain bike as well, correct?

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"Hi Ten" is ordinary carbon steel. Nothing really wrong with it, though it is not "high end" as this poster seems to be implying. This bike is fine, though that price definitely has to be negotiable. A hundred bucks is about right.
Thanks, I didn't know that. It sounded good to me, ahhh soo much to learn.

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Uh, beware of steel wheels!
My 27' had steel wheels.

Strong sure, but chromed braking surfaces suck in the rain!
Will do, thank you!
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Old 01-27-14, 04:41 PM   #10
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I will be taking a look for them. Just abit harder to find the proper one with the height and weight. I should be looking for a 64cm framed mountain bike as well, correct?
I have no idea, my bike shed is mountain bike free! I think they're measured in inches but something similar is probably what you want. You are going to have a whale of a tough time finding anything for somebody your height so don't get too fussy.
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Old 01-28-14, 08:57 AM   #11
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Just my two cents, I would pay $100 if the tires are good.
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Old 01-28-14, 04:23 PM   #12
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Hmm, I agree with the $100-125 price range more than the $175. Its in NICE shape from the pics, but its nothing special.

If you try it out and like the fit and everything, then spend what your comfortable with. Those tires look aged to me, but if they don't have cracks and are still soft, they should be OK.

I agree on steel rims, they do not stop very well. At all. Add water and they just don't stop! However, they are durable!

I'm more a fan of modern bikes, but the lugged steel frame on that is pretty nice looking. Check throughly for rust/corrosion on the chrome.

If it hasn't had it done, I would want to re-grease ALL of the bearings (wheels, crank, headset) put new cables, brake pads, and new chain. Thats just me, though.
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Old 01-28-14, 06:06 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
If you want a mountain bike, get a steel-framed hard tail, no front suspension model from the 90s or so. Used would be a great way to go and indeed, those are sturdy bikes.
+1, and maybe think about putting some drop bars on it.
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Old 01-29-14, 09:00 PM   #14
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Thanks for the input guys, really helpful! I'm a little confused tho, are there any specific rims I should be looking at if not steel? I see that they're slippery, but do I have any other options for my weight, for either road or mountain bikes?
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Old 01-29-14, 09:56 PM   #15
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Did you try to haggle that road bike down a little yet?
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Old 01-30-14, 01:16 AM   #16
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Uh, beware of steel wheels!
My 27' had steel wheels.

Strong sure, but chromed braking surfaces suck in the rain!

WHOA!!

27' BIKE?!?! Did you build it for Burning Man?




When I was 265lbs I rode a 27" steel wheel 64cm bike. I had to raise the seat post a ton, but fun bike.

And yes, I once turned rhe front wheel into a taco by turning suddenly and slamming on the brakes.

Look on ebay for variety.
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Old 01-30-14, 02:33 AM   #17
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Although the CCM might be the right size it is a low end model that is way overpriced for what it is... and you would fold those wheels in half in no time.

Finding taller frames can be a little more work but I'd look for a quality frame and have some custom wheels built... I have a client who is your size and he rides an XL mtb with a set of custom built tandem wheels (48 spoke) on custom built hubs and he has not had any issues in the 2 years he has been riding on them.

We went with the tandem hubs as they have better axle support front and rear as the front axle also experiences more stress when a rider is as big as you are... the rims are also proportionately strong and are the same wheelset my wife and I use on our tandem... we weigh 350 pounds as a couple.
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Old 01-30-14, 08:56 AM   #18
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I only knew CCM as a maker of hockey equipment so I looked it up. Interesting:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CCM_(cycle)
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