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  1. #1
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    Trek Ion CX Pro for heavy clyde, need advice.

    I purchased this bike last year and love it to death, so much easier to ride over my Trek Navigator, can easily ride more miles.
    Problem came up when I was just unsure of the wheels, ended up putting less than 15 miles on the flat highway.

    No issues, just realized that the front wheel was only 18 hole and rear 24 hole, I got nervous and thought I might have to buy some custom wheels before doing much riding.
    I know the frame is rated at 300# but with it being a cyclocross, should be stout enough for me to ride it gently on the main roads until I get down to the 300# mark.

    I am currently at 350, and hopefully by spring at 330 or less.
    Here is my ride, do you feel its a safe ride or would you upgrade the tires and wheels. Does everything else seem to be safe? I was not trying to get something to race, but figured if it could be raced hard, should be heavy duty enough for easy going for a big guy.

    2013 Trek Ion CX Pro
    54 cm Alpha 200 Frame
    Fork Trek Carbon Cross E2
    Bontrager Race Wheels 18 Hole Front, 24 Hole Back
    Bontrager CXO Team Issue 700X34 Tires
    Inflate 60psi 80 psi

    Wheel Info
    IMG_1131.jpg

    Thanks
    2013 Trek Ion CX Pro & 2013 Specialized Carve Comp
    2010 Trek Navigator 3.0

  2. #2
    Senior Member ahultin's Avatar
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    I wouldnt worry about it yet. For the riding you say you are doing, the wheels are not likely to fold on you but are more likely to start to become untrue and eventually start breaking spokes. My 20/24 spoke wheels lasted me about 2000 miles before starting to snap spokes. I purchased my road bike at about 330lbs
    Just start saving your pennies for when they start to go you can have a clyde worthy set built

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahultin View Post
    I wouldnt worry about it yet. For the riding you say you are doing, the wheels are not likely to fold on you but are more likely to start to become untrue and eventually start breaking spokes. My 20/24 spoke wheels lasted me about 2000 miles before starting to snap spokes. I purchased my road bike at about 330lbs
    Just start saving your pennies for when they start to go you can have a clyde worthy set built
    Thanks, I by no means plan on pushing it. I figure before I am up to any hills, I will be below the 300 lb mark
    2013 Trek Ion CX Pro & 2013 Specialized Carve Comp
    2010 Trek Navigator 3.0

  4. #4
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    I was riding some 20/24 Oval Concepts 535 series with DT Bladed spokes, Continental 4000 700x25, and here were my results. I weigh in about 225 and only do street riding. Less than 500 miles and I had broken a rear spoke. Within a week of the first spoke breaking, 3 more broken spokes 14 miles from home, I was stranded. The wheel has been rebuilt with DT 2.0 round spokes. I rode it for another 150 miles and it was out of true, wobbles, not just a bump. I took the front and read wheels off and they were both out of round; so far out of round I could see it and feel it. Once you break one spoke the remaining spokes will do the same. My advice is to start looking for some 36h rims sooner rather than later. You might have different results with your wheels but, it is no fun having to get a ride or hop on the bus.

  5. #5
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    If it were me, I'd have a new set of 36 to 40 spoke wheels built up, just for that bike. Sell the original wheels while they are still in good shape, to help finance the new ones. A 40 spoke rear and a 36 front, will carry just about anything without an issue. Assuming they are well built.

    I would also opt for bigger tires, if they will fit. Something like 37 to 40s, for the added comfort and carrying capacity. Something in a slick like tire, for less rolling resistance. Those knobs aren't doing you any favors, on the street.
    Last edited by Wanderer; 01-28-14 at 08:34 AM.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


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  6. #6
    Senior Member ill.clyde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    If it were me, I'd have a new set of 36 to 40 spoke wheels built up, just for that bike. Sell the original wheels while they are still in good shape, to help finance the new ones. A 40 spoke rear and a 36 front, will carry just about anything without an issue. Assuming they are well built.

    I would also opt for bigger tires, if they will fit. Something like 37 to 40s, for the added comfort and carrying capacity. Something in a slick like tire, for less rolling resistance. Those knobs aren't doing you any favors, on the street.
    No offense, but if he wanted something with wide tires he already had it with his Navigator that he was thrilled to be rid of.

    As for the OP.
    1. You're fine. Stop thinking and just ride. Your bike is safe.
    2. Sure, you may pop a spoke, it's called wear and tear. It happens. There's no need to freak out and spend money on another set of wheels. Not to mention, if you bought the bike at a shop, chances are you got a year, sometimes two, of free service/maintenance. Have your wheels checked often by your shop for routine maintenance.

  7. #7
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    There is already a huge difference between a 26" Navigator, and any cross bike...... skinny tires won't make it any more pleasant, nor make it go faster. Quality, wider, tires, will do both.

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


    Specialized Crosstrail Sport - '08
    Nishiki Sport - misappropriated from my youngest son (circa 1984)
    Marin Stinson - misappropriated by my youngest grandson - '01
    "The Beast" - 1990 Schwinn Airdyne (in the basement for winter torture)

  8. #8
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    At 350, I'd say it's safer to go with a 32 or 36 h wheelset. I'm not an alarmist by any stretch (I'm a 235 - 245 lb clyde riding/commuting on carbon road bike with 18/24 wheels), but at anything more, I'd have more peace of mind with a stronger wheelset--a nice 32 h would do it for me. As a matter of fact, my "winter" wheelset is a 32h custom (campy veloce hubs with velocity aerohead rims, brass nipples, db spokes). Ymmv.
    "I had this baby hand made in Tuscany, from titanium blessed by the pope. It weighs less than a fart, and costs more than a divorce..."

  9. #9
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    Thanks for the replies.
    Since its -10 here, have plenty of time before I get to ride, Lots of time to loose more weight.
    I am getting a Park wheel truing stand, and if I decide to use these tires and wheels may check them before and after a 5 mile ride and see how they are holding up. If good, will extend the ride and keep checking. If going out of true quickly will swap them out until I am down more.
    I do have the navigator to ride in a pinch but no where near as fun to ride.
    2013 Trek Ion CX Pro & 2013 Specialized Carve Comp
    2010 Trek Navigator 3.0

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