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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 04-07-14, 05:40 AM   #26
mrodgers
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Yup, we all seem to have time constraints. For me riding in the morning is out. Folks suggest going to bed early and getting up at 4:30 for a ride? Well, that's about when I get up to go to work. No way I'm going to bed at 6 PM so I can get up earlier to go for a ride.

I also have kids. Oldest is 13. At only 13, she is OK with leaving home, but I don't want to leave them too long. My wife works evenings so I am on homework duty, dinner duty and referee (LOL) in the evenings. I go out for about an hour to hour and a half, but have to do it early as I don't want it to be dark with them home alone.

Not too many nice long rides happen on the weekends. My wife is now getting more weekend days off (she didn't have a weekend off for about 4 years) so I can get out occasionally, but it is still pretty sporadic. When she's off during the week it is tough because there are things we need to do around the house together, especially now out in the yard with spring finally here. It's tough too because I only see her about twice a week, so it's tough to leave when I haven't seen her for a few days.
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Old 04-07-14, 06:35 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by mrodgers View Post
Yup, we all seem to have time constraints. For me riding in the morning is out. Folks suggest going to bed early and getting up at 4:30 for a ride? Well, that's about when I get up to go to work. No way I'm going to bed at 6 PM so I can get up earlier to go for a ride.

I also have kids. Oldest is 13. At only 13, she is OK with leaving home, but I don't want to leave them too long. My wife works evenings so I am on homework duty, dinner duty and referee (LOL) in the evenings. I go out for about an hour to hour and a half, but have to do it early as I don't want it to be dark with them home alone.

Not too many nice long rides happen on the weekends. My wife is now getting more weekend days off (she didn't have a weekend off for about 4 years) so I can get out occasionally, but it is still pretty sporadic. When she's off during the week it is tough because there are things we need to do around the house together, especially now out in the yard with spring finally here. It's tough too because I only see her about twice a week, so it's tough to leave when I haven't seen her for a few days.
You can always take your kids with you biking. Even when my son was 6 or 7, he was able to ride 8 or 10 miles. At 11, he did 30 miles, and at almost 13, there is no distance I can ride with him that he is not physically capable of doing.
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Old 04-07-14, 08:18 AM   #28
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I have to add to this: Before every ride, even if you don't plan on riding after dark, make sure you have fresh batteries or that your light is fully charged (if you have a rechargeable). I ride on a rural highway, thankfully there's not that much traffic at night as last summer I was stuck riding in the pitch black on two occasions when my lights did not work because..get this.. the batteries were dead! Apparently the humidity had something to do with it both times. After the second time, I threw the light in the trash. The light was a inexpensive Bell model, which seemed pretty bright for the cost when the batteries were brand new but once they get low, the lights are worth crap. I started carrying my helmet light that day forward and still keep it in my handlebar bag.
Good advice. I have two handlebar lights that are rechargeable and a headlamp that uses batteries. I keep a fresh set of batteries in my under seat repair stuff and when I replace batteries I do it from there and then put new ones back in the repair bag thing. Same for the rear blinkies.
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Old 04-07-14, 10:04 AM   #29
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+1 on commuting. The weather is improving so I'm about to ramp up my commuting. It's a 12-mile trip, one way, and if I'm feeling particularly good I can extend the ride home to get me 30 miles in a day. It's an excellent solution but it's not for everyone of course.

Helps that I have a place to shower and clean up upon arrival in the morning.
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Old 04-07-14, 12:20 PM   #30
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You can always take your kids with you biking. Even when my son was 6 or 7, he was able to ride 8 or 10 miles. At 11, he did 30 miles, and at almost 13, there is no distance I can ride with him that he is not physically capable of doing.
Yeah, the 13 year old will ride with me and wants to ride. The 10 year old on the other hand, it's major drama to get out to the bike trail, and then major drama once we get about a mile (at about 4 mph) and she is ready to walk back. Been there, done that, must have exercise and lose weight, thus riding with her isn't going to cut it.

Unfortunately, can't leave the 10 year old at home alone (though I was able to for very short periods, such as to run to the gas station, when my other daughter was 10. The maturity level difference between them at equivalent ages is drastic.)
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Old 04-07-14, 08:39 PM   #31
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Yeah, the 13 year old will ride with me and wants to ride. The 10 year old on the other hand, it's major drama to get out to the bike trail, and then major drama once we get about a mile (at about 4 mph) and she is ready to walk back. Been there, done that, must have exercise and lose weight, thus riding with her isn't going to cut it.

Unfortunately, can't leave the 10 year old at home alone (though I was able to for very short periods, such as to run to the gas station, when my other daughter was 10. The maturity level difference between them at equivalent ages is drastic.)
At 10, I was still using a trailer cycle. Yes, grossly overloaded...

Made braking on hills more a matter of attempt vs. effective.
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Old 04-07-14, 10:19 PM   #32
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Von,

I noticed the double chainring on that red bike --- if that bike is representative of the hardware you have at your disposal -- I'd suggest thinking about a triple option -- or grafting on a vintage mountain bike crank with 110 bcd and leaving the granny off possibly to make a compact gearset which looks appropriate for your ride

--- You may feel like your crawling up some hills --- but it beats walking, and before long , you'll be riding up them a little more spiritedly
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