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  1. #1
    That guy from the Chi Chitown_Mike's Avatar
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    Clipless pedals - what are you using? What would you avoid?

    Ok so I am in a crisis here. I am looking for a SPD compatible pedal for my road bike and been reading reviews of both road oriented and mountain bike style pedals. Of course as you read anything on the internet, the bad always pops out and before you know it you have cancer and can't eat anything because it causes cancer other than organic dirt. Except this is with bike pedals and not cancer....but if I don't get the right pedals then I could hurt blood flow to my feet, which means amputated toes, which then means no riding, which means an increase in cancer....AHHHHHH!!! Silly rabbit holes and WebMD....

    But I digress, I have a set of Shimano A530's on my commuter/beater/run around bike. I so far love them! The dual style pedal is nice if I am just running to the store and want to wear gym shoes, but that isn't what I want for my roadie.....because race bike (ok, not really but really )

    So I am currently weighing some options on pedals for the road bike. I really like white (it is a blue and white Allez that these are going on) and weight isn't TOO big a deal but I don't want clunky pedals.

    I am trying to keep this under $60 for pedals if possible, and for SPD cleats.

    Is the platform that my foot pushes against that important to have a wider base to? Or will a small, technically mountain bike style, pedal work just as well? I can see how a wide pedal means more power transfer, and how on a MTB you aren't looking for a lot of power transfer just to be held onto the bike, but obviously on the road that is different. And I don't want to have 2 sets of cleats for 2 bikes, so SPD-SL isn't in the picture right now. Since we are bigger folks would there be a benefit to the wider pedal? Or will I not notice a difference? Will numb toes and hot spots creep in if I go with a smaller, MTB oriented pedal?

    Right now I am looking at a few options and wanted to know what my fellow C&A folks have used. I don't want to ask on the road forum because, well, I am not a weight weenie and have another 30 lbs or so to lose off me, so grams aren't THAT important.

    I like these the best: Shimano PD-M530's - They seem to fit my purposes, look really nice, and aren't through the roof expensive. And I like Shimano products. Especially dual entry and the fact they are white.
    http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-M53..._cd_al_qh_dp_t

    The next is the more road directed A520 pedal, which is really close to what I have BUT not a dual sided pedal. I like the M530's for the dual entry, but is it that important?
    http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A52...s=shimano+a520

    There are the Ultegra A600s but those are a bit out of the price range I want to spend on pedals (since the bike needs rims and tires). But obviously they are probably the lightest and best option, but are they really worth $80? Has anyone used these on a road bike before?

    The last options I was looking at is the M520 and M540 pedals. They are really small so it would just be a place to clip in, and aesthetically they aren't very pleasing.

    So, what say ye my fellow clip-less Clyde riders?
    Looking forward to my winter commuting adventure.....

  2. #2
    Senior Member antimonysarah's Avatar
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    I definitely would prefer dual-entry -- I have the M324s (or a predecessor but the same thing) on my around-town bike, which are basically the same as the A320 and I'm always flipping them over no matter which side I'm using. My road bike has either the M520s or M540s, I can't remember which, and they're great. I go with a sturdy sole over a big pedal -- shoe fit and comfort is more important IMHO than cleat size for preventing hotspots/numbness.

    And it looks like you can get the M520 in white-and-silver, which might work for you aesthetically if you go that route.

  3. #3
    Senior Member RPK79's Avatar
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    I have the M540's. They work just fine.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ill.clyde's Avatar
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    Right tool for the job ... Road bike = Road pedals, and to me that means SPD-SL.

    So yes, single entry, specific cleat. Mine are Shimano Ultegras I think, I got them at the Chicago Bike Swap a few years back and I love them. In a pinch I can ride around the neighborhood with my kids without my shoes. I just rest my street shoes on the pedals and ride.

    On my cross bike I have eggbeaters, so yes, I have a specific pair of shoes for those. The bike doubles as my commuter so the MTB shoes make it easier for walking after I'm off the bike. I can ride those without my shoes too, in a pinch, but with eggbeaters it's not quite as comfortable.

    Not saying my way is best, but it's my way and it's my preferred way

    As for numb toes and hot spots, that's more about fit than it is about the actual type of pedal.

  5. #5
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    I've used the M520's and the A600. The wider platform is noticeable with the A600. Its a bit of a strange feeling since it actually partially interfaces with the rubber shoe sole. The M520 is easier to get into since its double-sided. You can find M520's in white which should help aesthetics.

    There's no reason to get SPD-SL. Standard SPD works just fine. I have both, mainly because my bike shoes were three-bolt road shoes, since there were no acceptable SPD style shoes at reasonable cost.

  6. #6
    Senior Member JReade's Avatar
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    I have look cleats on my commuter and roadie. I commute right to my office and don't walk around when I get here, so that's the simple part. I ride the commuter around with my regular shoes too, just put my feel on the pedals like regular.
    Jesse

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    I like M540s. I prefer smaller SPD pedals with a stiff mountain shoe.

  8. #8
    That guy from the Chi Chitown_Mike's Avatar
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    I appreciate the suggestions thus far. I forgot to mention I am running around in Shimano RT82s, which are really comfy to ride and OK to walk around in.

    For those running the M series pedals, like the 520s and 540s, are you having any "hot spots" because of the smaller platform? From some of the reading I have done so far people complain about having their feet get hot spots and attribute it to the smaller platform of the pedal. Thoughts on that?
    Looking forward to my winter commuting adventure.....

  9. #9
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    So been riding many years (45) and have used a number of different pedals... it's all so personal. I used Speedplay X2 for many years. The pedal was easy to use and the "float" made riding comfortable however, after many years the small pedal and platform caused a severe injury to my foot, one of which will never go away (I get "hot spots" after about 30 miles of riding). Also, the Speedplay cleat is very uncomfortable to wear off the bike. If you like to cycle tour like me, not practicable.

    I ride road and mountain bikes and for years used different pedal systems.... I finally figured out it would be better to use the same system just different model pedals so its the same cleat on my shoes and same way to engage and disenagage... I like TIME, I use the road version on my road bike and ZControl Platforms on the mountain bikes. With the cleat I can use a mountain bike style shoe (like Sidi Dominators) so I can walk around without worrying about damaging the cleat.
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  10. #10
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    M520 and Time ATAC Alium.

    ATAC have been sitting for years. I prefer the M520 to be honest. They are a lot more positive getting out. The time are a lot easier to clip in, but since they are on my road bike, I'm good with the shimano.

    I've thought of getting road pedals, but I prefer mountain shoes so I don't have to walk funny.
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  11. #11
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    I have Shimano PD-M520 pedals on most of my bikes. You can find them for $30-35 and they seem pretty durable. My $5000 road bike uses Shimano XTR PD-M970 pedals. If I hadn't found them on sale for 50% off, I'd have gone with the M520 or M540. I like double-sided pedals and shoes that I can walk in. I've used expensive road pedals (Look) in the past. They were more difficult to clip into than SPDs and the shoes were more difficult to walk in. Used with a shoe that has a stiff sole, I couldn't tell any difference in power transfer or comfort between the $300 Look pedals and the $30 M520s...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
    Is the platform that my foot pushes against that important to have a wider base to? Or will a small, technically mountain bike style, pedal work just as well?
    I used to be fine (ride a century, ride a 420 mile seven day tour, whatever) with tiny little pedals. In theory the soles of your shoes should be stiff enough that it doesn't matter, although some walkable recreational shoes are less stiff and it might.

    Right now I am looking at a few options and wanted to know what my fellow C&A folks have used.
    Ultegra PD-6500 single sided SPDs. Classic silver. Worked fine but wore out.

    Ritchey Road Logic single sided SPDs. Classic silver. Worked fine but wore out.

    Bebop double sided with lots of float, external cleats that while 2-hole weren't very walkable. Cleat life was horrible (like 3000 miles a set) so I abandoned them after two pairs of cleats.

    Shimano PD-M540 double sided in classic silver. I'd say they work fine but I've been getting a numb spot in my right toes after riding much over an hour. They're no different than the other SPDs so I don't think its the pedals. Could be that I changed shoes and got the cleats in a slightly different place. Could be because I broke my right leg and seem to ride a little more duck-footed on that side. COuld be because I stretched a nerve when I did that.

    $51 with free shipping via amazon prime
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I expect the $32 PD-M520s would have worked as well, although they are not classic silver which is about the same color as the underlying aluminum which will be showing after you chew it up with steel SPD cleats

    http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-M52...shimano+PD-520

    as a foot note, getting into the single sided pedals was more reliable than the double sided ones provided the bearings turned freely because the pedals would always hang with the same heavy spot down while the double sided pedals are balanced and stay in whatever position they end up in.

    I like the M530's for the dual entry, but is it that important?
    It can be counter-productive for getting into them, although with twice the surfaces the pedals should take twice as long to wear out.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 02-12-14 at 11:02 PM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
    I appreciate the suggestions thus far. I forgot to mention I am running around in Shimano RT82s, which are really comfy to ride and OK to walk around in.

    For those running the M series pedals, like the 520s and 540s, are you having any "hot spots" because of the smaller platform? From some of the reading I have done so far people complain about having their feet get hot spots and attribute it to the smaller platform of the pedal. Thoughts on that?
    I didn't used to, but have started getting that in my right foot and have yet to figure out if it's me (I did break that leg, had some nerve problems for a while, and ride a little more duck-footed on that side), a newer set of the same shoes where I got the cleats in a slightly different fore/aft position, or what.

  14. #14
    The Left Coast, USA FrenchFit's Avatar
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    For SPDs I prefer the VP pedals to Shimano. I think I've been using the 'VP-R61' on two bikes, one sided minimal pedals. I like the positive click in and spring pop break out - they just feel well designed to me. For all day rides, it will be thermalites w/fixie straps.

  15. #15
    That guy from the Chi Chitown_Mike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFit View Post
    For SPDs I prefer the VP pedals to Shimano. I think I've been using the 'VP-R61' on two bikes, one sided minimal pedals. I like the positive click in and spring pop break out - they just feel well designed to me. For all day rides, it will be thermalites w/fixie straps.
    Hmmm, never heard of VP so I will have to check them out. The few pictures I see online are nice looking so far.

    @Drew Eckhardt - thanks for your thorough thoughts! I bid on a set of M540s on ebay so we will see. Otherwise someone local is selling some M520s on craigs list.
    Looking forward to my winter commuting adventure.....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
    For those running the M series pedals, like the 520s and 540s, are you having any "hot spots" because of the smaller platform? From some of the reading I have done so far people complain about having their feet get hot spots and attribute it to the smaller platform of the pedal. Thoughts on that?
    If your shoe has a stiff sole and fits well, you shouldn't have any problems with hot spots. Inexpensive shoes, on the other hand, frequently don't have the best soles and you may experience hot spots with them. My Specialized BG Comp shoes have never given me a problem. I've occasionally had problems with my Shimano MT-31 (MT=Mountain Touring) shoes, usually when I've done long (60+ mile) rides for multiple days in a row (ex: my SF->LA tour). I was able to fit a slightly more padded insole into the MT-31, but they still start to get uncomfortable around the 75-mile mark.

    Edit: cleat impact can also have an impact on whether you develop hotspots or not. I find that I generally have my cleats pushed as far back as possible, which places the ball of my foot inline with the pedal spindle. Nothing else works as well for me. YMMV.

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    I use Look and Speedplay on my road bikes, SPD on my commuter, and platform pedals on my MTB. I really like the SPD'S for ease of use off the bike, but it's tough to get a shoe that works great for prolonged periods on the bike and comfort off. I needed two shoes anyway, so I went straight to Look KEO's on the road bike.
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  18. #18
    Senior Member RPK79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
    Hmmm, never heard of VP so I will have to check them out. The few pictures I see online are nice looking so far.

    @Drew Eckhardt - thanks for your thorough thoughts! I bid on a set of M540s on ebay so we will see. Otherwise someone local is selling some M520s on craigs list.
    Those VP-163 with the black and red look okay, but it doesn't look like they have a North American distributor...

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    If your shoe has a stiff sole and fits well, you shouldn't have any problems with hot spots. Inexpensive shoes, on the other hand, frequently don't have the best soles and you may experience hot spots with them.
    +1

    If your shoe has a stiff enough sole, you can ride any pedal you want.

    If the sole isn't stiff enough, perhaps you should try a large platform pedal.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
    +1

    If your shoe has a stiff enough sole, you can ride any pedal you want.

    If the sole isn't stiff enough, perhaps you should try a large platform pedal.
    Ah, but therein lies the conundrum... Too stiff and you remove the off bike advantage; too soft and they suck for pedaling (without a platform). I have compromise shoes too (Shimano MT22's), but there is nothing like a truly stiff sole for transferring power/avoiding foot pain during prolonged rides--the 087 Shimano road shoes for me in this case. So it's the "proper tool for the job" thing again. Mike takes long rides...
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  21. #21
    That guy from the Chi Chitown_Mike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
    +1

    If your shoe has a stiff enough sole, you can ride any pedal you want.

    If the sole isn't stiff enough, perhaps you should try a large platform pedal.
    The shoes I picked up recently aren't a race stiff shoe, but they have little flex in them. At least I can't bend them by hand and they only slightly flex when walking in them. They are still relatively new, only have about 100 miles in them, most of that on a trainer. I avoided a traditional MTB shoe by going with the RT-82 and after reading the reviews on them, and their predecessor the RT-81, I went with them. I wanted one shoe for the roadie and my commuter, for now at least.


    So are most people getting hot spots from the cleats needing to be adjusted or the shoe not fitting properly and your foot moving around?
    Looking forward to my winter commuting adventure.....

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
    If the sole isn't stiff enough, perhaps you should try a large platform pedal.
    If the sole isn't stiff enough, just buy a different shoe, not a different pedal? I've only ever had problems with one pair of shoes many years ago, after that I made sure to get stiff soles and haven't had hot spot issues since. Being able to walk around easily is huge IMO, even if it's just walking a little around a meeting spot pre-ride, a coffee shop break, or whatever. Also in hopefully rare instances one may run into a mechanical problem one can't solve on the road and it can be nice to have the option to easily walk a mile or two to get home/back to car/get help.

    Maybe only if you go through multiple shoes and still get a hot spot then consider road-style pedals. Having used both styles I just can't see any compelling advantage for road pedals, to me with a stiff sole I can't feel any difference the platform or power transfer.

  23. #23
    Senior Member ill.clyde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erwin8r View Post
    Ah, but therein lies the conundrum... Too stiff and you remove the off bike advantage; too soft and they suck for pedaling (without a platform). I have compromise shoes too (Shimano MT22's), but there is nothing like a truly stiff sole for transferring power/avoiding foot pain during prolonged rides--the 087 Shimano road shoes for me in this case. So it's the "proper tool for the job" thing again. Mike takes long rides...
    exactly

  24. #24
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chitown_Mike View Post
    Is the platform that my foot pushes against that important to have a wider base to? Or will a small, technically mountain bike style, pedal work just as well? I can see how a wide pedal means more power transfer, and how on a MTB you aren't looking for a lot of power transfer just to be held onto the bike, but obviously on the road that is different. And I don't want to have 2 sets of cleats for 2 bikes, so SPD-SL isn't in the picture right now. Since we are bigger folks would there be a benefit to the wider pedal? Or will I not notice a difference? Will numb toes and hot spots creep in if I go with a smaller, MTB oriented pedal?

    The last options I was looking at is the M520 and M540 pedals. They are really small so it would just be a place to clip in, and aesthetically they aren't very pleasing.

    So, what say ye my fellow clip-less Clyde riders?
    You are mistaken about mountain bike pedals. The aren't just something to hold you onto the bike. Mountain bikes have to put as much to the tires as a road bike, perhaps more. Part of the reason that the pedals are small are because the cleat and the fact that you are likely to have to walk on the shoe much more often and in worse conditions than you do would with a road bike shoe. The other part is clearance. An overly wide pedal on a mountain bike is going to hit things on the side of trails. A smaller pedal lets you get closer to rocks without strikes that could throw you off the bike.

    Personally, I use mostly M520s on everything from mountain bikes to fast road bikes. They are cheap, durable and relatively light. I have a couple of bikes with XT level pedals and one with Xpedo pedals. None of them perform any better than the M520 and cost more.

    I've also tried the A520 or, rather, I had my wife try it first. After she tried it and told me how bad it was I tried it. It was the single worst pedal I've ever used. The retention system hangs down when I unclicked. This puts your foot on the underside of the pedal which is extremely slick. I hate having to fiddle with flipping pedals (another advantage of mountain bike pedals) but I hate slipping off the pedals even more.
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  25. #25
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    I was using M520's for over 6 years till my shoes quit.
    I had them on everything from folders to hybrids and
    for the last 5 years; on a roadbike. I liked them a lot;
    dual sided entry means no flipping. I hardly lubed them
    but they still kept on working fine. I probably would
    still use them, but when my MTB shoes broke I decided
    to try Speedplay X.

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