Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1
    WEK
    WEK is offline
    Senior Member WEK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    My Bikes
    KHS Flite 747, Specialized Hardrock
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Any Clydes (especially Super-Clydes) on Speedplay pedals?

    Curious if any particularly big riders have experience with Speedplay pedals. As many of you know by now, I'm 6'10" tall and 350. Taking a close look at Speedplays in no small part due to their adjustability (read "knee saving") features and ease. What's everyone think? Anyone of substantial size have experience with them?

  2. #2
    Senior Member JerrySTL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Near St. Louis, Missouri
    My Bikes
    Giant Defy Advanced, Windsor Tourist
    Posts
    769
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been using Speedplay X2 pedals for over a decade. I'm "only" around 220 lbs though.

    I know that some models of the Speedplay pedals, such as the X1's, have a weight limit somewhere around 180 lbs. I think it's mostly those with titanium axles.

    In general Speedplay's are great. Just make sure to buy some cleat covers for walking on them as (1) the cleats are expensive, and (2) dirt and grim inside the cleats make it difficult to clip in or out. I know this is true of the X2's. A thin wire, such as a broken spoke, or small allen wrench can clean out the dirt behind the springs.

    Many Speedplay pedals require their bearings to be lubed every 1000 miles or so. Harbor Freight sells a cheap ($6) grease *** that's perfect for the job. Just fill it with your favorite grease. I use automotive axle grease. It's an easy job.

    3 Oz. Mini Grease ***

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    417
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are 185lb weight limits on ones with titanium spindles and the nanogram zeros, so if you go with them pick stainless or chromoly. I like the chromoly more because the spindles are slightly longer.

    I've only been using them since ~240, so not a complete answer, but I have never had any problems after a few thousand miles. I've got chromoly light action pedals. I got them because of osteoarthritis (still mainly inflammation). I have slightly odd knees so I have to ride with a slightly non-ideal leg position - knees slightly out. Once that was all figured out by my PT I haven't had any issues related to the pedals.

    They're really weird feeling the first few hundred miles until your brain adjusts to them. Not in a bad way, but the common description is "pedaling on ice cubes". I don't walk too much in the cleats so I have avoided the problems with mud in the cleats, and when I do walk I use cleat covers.

    They're nice for one other reason (especially the light action with bigger cleats) - the cleats are like platform pedals, so if your shoes aren't as stiff as they could be you still have a pretty big surface to push on.

    They're a little tight at first to clip out of (zeros more than light action).

    I've turned the cranks more than 325,000 times since New Years according to Garmin Connect, the only knee pain coming when there were significant weather changes. Other than my main bike everything has SPDs and I have to keep the spring tension near minimum to try and hold off knee pain on those.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ellensburg,WA
    My Bikes
    Schwinn Broadway, Specialized Secteur Sport(crashed) Spec. Roubaix Sport, Spec. Crux
    Posts
    1,786
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have Zeros and since getting them I think I might have been as high as 246 pounds. They have been problem free. I lube the cleats often with their dry lube. It makes a big difference IMHO. I now have covers that stay on all the time which only protect the metal plate bottom. You can even ride without cleats for short distances. I once walked about 100 feet on a muddy road; I will not do that again. Speedplay have a huge adjustment range but if needed your Specialized dealer should have adapters with even more adjustment.


    Mark

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,155
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WEK View Post
    Taking a close look at Speedplays in no small part due to their adjustability (read "knee saving") features and ease. What's everyone think?
    Are you sure you need the adjustability? I used to think I needed pedals with a lot of float. Turns out I just needed to learn how to position the cleats properly on my shoes! My ultra-expensive adjustable-float Look pedals are now sitting in a drawer somewhere and I have cheap Shimano SPD mountain bike pedals on all of my bikes...

  6. #6
    WEK
    WEK is offline
    Senior Member WEK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    My Bikes
    KHS Flite 747, Specialized Hardrock
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    Are you sure you need the adjustability? I used to think I needed pedals with a lot of float. Turns out I just needed to learn how to position the cleats properly on my shoes! My ultra-expensive adjustable-float Look pedals are now sitting in a drawer somewhere and I have cheap Shimano SPD mountain bike pedals on all of my bikes...
    Fair point, and worth considering. Given my size, locking in completely doesn't seem to be the way to go. That said, it could be a matter of adjusting and readjusting SPDs. Whatever I pick, though, I would like to stick with. So if it's likely that I'm going to switch to float eventually, it may just be best to start with float.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ellensburg,WA
    My Bikes
    Schwinn Broadway, Specialized Secteur Sport(crashed) Spec. Roubaix Sport, Spec. Crux
    Posts
    1,786
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WEK View Post
    Fair point, and worth considering. Given my size, locking in completely doesn't seem to be the way to go. That said, it could be a matter of adjusting and readjusting SPDs. Whatever I pick, though, I would like to stick with. So if it's likely that I'm going to switch to float eventually, it may just be best to start with float.
    Please explain the bolded part. If you don't want to be locked in securely you'd be better with toe clips and platform pedals. Too much float if one has range of motion problems can also be bad.


    Mark

  8. #8
    WEK
    WEK is offline
    Senior Member WEK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    My Bikes
    KHS Flite 747, Specialized Hardrock
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Black wallnut View Post
    Please explain the bolded part. If you don't want to be locked in securely you'd be better with toe clips and platform pedals. Too much float if one has range of motion problems can also be bad.
    The short answer is that I've tried SPDs, and the amount of torque I put down on everything means I didn't like the lack of float I felt--it was as though everything was twisting forcefully as I put down power, rather than flowing smoothly. But, as was pointed out above, that may be a matter of experimenting re-positioning and adjusting the SPDs.
    Last edited by WEK; 03-14-14 at 03:28 PM.

  9. #9
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    2
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    good,Speedplay have a huge adjustment range but if needed your Specialized dealer should have adapters with even more adjustment.thanks

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    northern Deep South
    My Bikes
    Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee
    Posts
    1,892
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been riding Frogs since I was over 310# with no problems. (Except for that one time I rebuilt the pedals without threadlock, and the pedal body unscrewed and fell off, but that's another story.) The free float takes a little getting used to. It took me about 20 minutes of riding to get used to the float, but a few people never do. Make sure you get steel spindles; since I ride in almost any weather, mine are stainless steel.

  11. #11
    Me and the cat... Pamestique's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Tustin, CA
    My Bikes
    2002 Lemond Zurich, 2006 Santa Cruz Superlight, 2010 Landshark, 2012 Santa Cruz Juliana, 2014 Juliana Premiero Origin 29er and last but not least, the "Frankenweenie"!
    Posts
    4,465
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I started with Speedplay many years ago because of knee pain. I stopped using them because 1) they were just a real pain - you can't walk around in them and get one speck of grit on them, can't engage in the pedal and 2) they caused a severe injury to my left foot, one that has never gone away because the platform was too small... that said, there are other pedals that have "float". I switched to Time Atac which has a larger platform and have never experienced knee pain. I realize this is not relevant to your question... just my lame 2 cents...
    Last edited by Pamestique; 03-14-14 at 02:32 PM.
    ______________________________________________________________

    Private docent led mountain bike rides through Limestone Canyon. Go to letsgooutside.org and register today! Also available: hikes, equestrian rides and family events as well as trail maintenance and science study.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,155
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WEK View Post
    Fair point, and worth considering. Given my size, locking in completely doesn't seem to be the way to go. That said, it could be a matter of adjusting and readjusting SPDs. Whatever I pick, though, I would like to stick with. So if it's likely that I'm going to switch to float eventually, it may just be best to start with float.
    I suppose there are two schools of thought on this. One school of thought says that lots of float is great, because it allows you to find the perfect position for your feet+knees and vary the position when necessary. The other school of thought says that a pedal with less float keeps everything in exactly the right position (once the pedals and cleats are adjusted properly) whereas pedals with lots of float require you to have the perfect pedal stroke to keep everything properly lined up... and most recreational cyclists don't have a perfect pedal stroke.

    When I switched from improperly adjusted SPD pedals to Look pedals with lots of float, I noticed that short (<20mi) rides were immediately more comfortable. Longer rides, on the other hand, were just as painful as ever. I thought I just had bad knees and there was nothing to be done about it! Now I've got a bike that fits properly, SPD pedals that are properly adjusted, and I can literally ride as far as I want without any knee pain.

    This isn't to suggest that SPD pedals will work for everyone. They won't. Cleat position is adjustable, but the range of adjustments is quite modest. In any event, you can try SPD pedals for around $35 (ex: SPD-M520L; currently $25+shipping @ Nashbar). If you don't like them, you can probably sell them for $5-10 less than you paid.

  13. #13
    Senior Member rsacilotto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Saugus, Massachusetts, United States
    My Bikes
    1983 Trek 760, 2000 Fuji Team, 1988 Schwinn Voyageur
    Posts
    210
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JerrySTL View Post
    I've been using Speedplay X2 pedals for over a decade. I'm "only" around 220 lbs though.

    I know that some models of the Speedplay pedals, such as the X1's, have a weight limit somewhere around 180 lbs. I think it's mostly those with titanium axles.

    In general Speedplay's are great. Just make sure to buy some cleat covers for walking on them as (1) the cleats are expensive, and (2) dirt and grim inside the cleats make it difficult to clip in or out. I know this is true of the X2's. A thin wire, such as a broken spoke, or small allen wrench can clean out the dirt behind the springs.

    Many Speedplay pedals require their bearings to be lubed every 1000 miles or so. Harbor Freight sells a cheap ($6) grease *** that's perfect for the job. Just fill it with your favorite grease. I use automotive axle grease. It's an easy job.

    3 Oz. Mini Grease ***
    +1, except I was up to 250 or so. They work great for me.

  14. #14
    just pedal donalson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Kemah, TX (greater Houston area)
    My Bikes
    Surly Disc Trucker, Klein stage comp, trek 560
    Posts
    902
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    as mentioned about float... by rotating the cleat on some other brands you don't need a TON of float, just to have the cleat adjusted in the proper angle, I had to over rotate my ankle to get out if I didn't do this and I'm sure you could do the same with how easy it is to dial in massive amounts of float in speedplays... if I recall correctly my old wellgo SPD knock offs only had 4* of float and even with that it was never an issue but it did require the cleat to be more dialed in


    I am thinking of moving to a proper road pedal system at some point though, I have some slightly older carbon soled specialized S works shoes and even those aren't stiff enough to stop hot spots after about 40 miles under my 300# with SPD's... :-/
    mtbr clyd moderator

  15. #15
    Senior Member Cycle Babble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    1996 Trek 820 Mountain Bike, 2010 Gary Fisher Tarpon, 2013 Trek Domane 4.5C
    Posts
    167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Black wallnut View Post
    I have Zeros and since getting them I think I might have been as high as 246 pounds. They have been problem free. I lube the cleats often with their dry lube. It makes a big difference IMHO. I now have covers that stay on all the time which only protect the metal plate bottom. You can even ride without cleats for short distances. I once walked about 100 feet on a muddy road; I will not do that again. Speedplay have a huge adjustment range but if needed your Specialized dealer should have adapters with even more adjustment.
    Speaking of covers....is there a cover one can get for SPD-SL shoes that would cover the cleats so one could walk around without the feeling of wearing high-heels in reverse? That would be handy when on a long bike ride.

    Thanks,
    John S
    The Declaration of Independence grants me the right to the pursuit of happiness.......I choose that pursuit on my bike.

  16. #16
    Senior Member MattFoley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Arlington, VA
    Posts
    570
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WEK View Post
    The short answer is that I've tried SPDs, and the amount of torque I put down on everything means I don't like no float. But, as was pointed out above, that may be a matter of experimenting re-positioning and adjusting the SPDs.
    I'm confused...SPDs have 6-9 degrees of float, depending on whether you get the single release or multi-release. AFAIK, there is no "no float" SPD cleat.
    Cars man, whyyyyyy?!?!?!?!

  17. #17
    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southern CaliFORNIA.
    My Bikes
    KHS Alite 500, Trek 7.2 FX , Masi Partenza, Masi Fixed Special, Masi Cran Criterium
    Posts
    2,950
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I started out loving my speed play zero's but the affair is pretty much over. The cleats are expensive, and mine developed a round indent from abrasion with the pedal after less than 5k miles. This causes severe foot pain on long rides since the pedal actually exerts pressure through the sole of the shoe with the cleat worn thin. Now I need to replace the Cleats. I have a set of Frogs where the cleat, one piece die cast, broke and had to be replaced for $$$. Looking now to replace the Zeros with something else. Egg Beaters and Look are options I need to explore.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Ellensburg,WA
    My Bikes
    Schwinn Broadway, Specialized Secteur Sport(crashed) Spec. Roubaix Sport, Spec. Crux
    Posts
    1,786
    Mentioned
    10 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle Babble View Post
    Speaking of covers....is there a cover one can get for SPD-SL shoes that would cover the cleats so one could walk around without the feeling of wearing high-heels in reverse? That would be handy when on a long bike ride.

    Thanks,
    John S
    I have never used SPD however I used to have Look KEO and had cafe covers, beyond the fact that one kept falling off covers make the awkward ankle angle worse so yes it feels as you would imagine.


    Mark

  19. #19
    WEK
    WEK is offline
    Senior Member WEK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    My Bikes
    KHS Flite 747, Specialized Hardrock
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Pamestique View Post
    I started with Speedplay many years ago because of knee pain. I stopped using them because 1) they were just a real pain - you can't walk around in them and get one speck of grit on them, can't engage in the pedal and 2) they caused a severe injury to my left foot, one that has never gone away because the platform was too small... that said, there are other pedals that have "float". I switched to Time Atac which has a larger platform and have never experienced knee pain. I realize this is not relevant to your question... just my lame 2 cents...
    Everyone's experiences are relevant to my question. I appreciate the input.

  20. #20
    WEK
    WEK is offline
    Senior Member WEK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    My Bikes
    KHS Flite 747, Specialized Hardrock
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    In any event, you can try SPD pedals for around $35 (ex: SPD-M520L; currently $25+shipping @ Nashbar). If you don't like them, you can probably sell them for $5-10 less than you paid.
    This is a particularly good point (though all of your input is helpful). It may be worth simply trying properly adjusted/fit SPD-pedals and making sure I buy road shoes that are compatible with all types of cleats.

  21. #21
    WEK
    WEK is offline
    Senior Member WEK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    My Bikes
    KHS Flite 747, Specialized Hardrock
    Posts
    122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CommuteCommando View Post
    I started out loving my speed play zero's but the affair is pretty much over. The cleats are expensive, and mine developed a round indent from abrasion with the pedal after less than 5k miles. This causes severe foot pain on long rides since the pedal actually exerts pressure through the sole of the shoe with the cleat worn thin. Now I need to replace the Cleats. I have a set of Frogs where the cleat, one piece die cast, broke and had to be replaced for $$$. Looking now to replace the Zeros with something else. Egg Beaters and Look are options I need to explore.
    I'm a little fascinated by Egg Beaters, if for no other reason than I see several versions of them in every single LBS, but I don't think I've ever seen someone with them on the road. I'm sure there are plenty who have them, but with how ubiquitous they seem in the marketplace, I find it odd that I have literally never seen them being ridden. Perhaps they're more a mountain bike thing?
    Last edited by WEK; 03-14-14 at 04:49 PM.

  22. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Mid-Atlantic
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    548
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I hav Frogs. Also have SPDs and of course they "Float" but there is a lot of resistance compared to Speedplays.

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,155
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by WEK View Post
    I'm a little fascinated by Egg Beaters, if for no other reason than I see several versions of them in every single LBS, but I don't think I've ever seen someone with them on the road. I'm sure there are plenty who have them, but with how ubiquitous they seem in the marketplace, I find it odd that I have literally never seen them being ridden. Perhaps they're more a mountain bike thing?
    EggBeaters are most definitely a mountain bike pedal. I suspect that most roadies wouldn't be caught dead with them. Not that a dedicated roadie would use SPD either. Shimano SPD-SL and Look Keo are the most popular road pedals.

    The four-sided design of EggBeaters makes them particularly easy to clip into. The problem, at least for me, was the 15- or 20-degree release angle. When I started mountain biking, I found that I fell over quite a bit because I couldn't get out of the EggBeaters fast enough. I found SPDs, with their significantly shallower release angle, were much easier to unclip.

  24. #24
    Climbers Apprentice vesteroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,475
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was 272 when I started riding zeros. I had to buy decent shoes (you try finding cheap shoes in a 50) and have never had a single issue.

    i would not switch for anything.

    save yourself some cash and buy the steel vs the stainless...it's only grams of difference in weight. It huge difference in cost.
    There's indecision when you aint got nothin left

  25. #25
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    2,572
    Mentioned
    41 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Bike shops can order some with wider axles for E width feet's shoes, Web sellers order cases of just one version.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •