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-   -   Dealing with tail bone pain (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/938119-dealing-tail-bone-pain.html)

Greyfeld 03-13-14 04:50 PM

Dealing with tail bone pain
 
Thanks to the men and women in this forum, I started riding several months ago as part of my weight loss regimen. I've lost over 60 pounds so far, and I'm still going strong.

However, I've developed an issue with tail bone pain in the process.

If the surface I'm sitting on isn't *extremely* soft, my tail bone starts hurting like hell. Even the harder edges of my bed mattress trigger the pain. Fortunately, I have a computer chair that I sit in all the time that doesn't cause me any problems. But even some softer surfaces like movie theater seats just make the area go numb, then hurt like hell when I go to stand up.

There was a period for about two weeks when my bike was in the shop, so I was hoping that the respite would give me time to heal. But it didn't seem to really do any good.

Not riding long enough for it to heal isn't really an option right now. It's pretty much the only exercise I'm getting, and I can't afford to lose my progress. Is there anything I can do to help heal my tail bone, without taking a break from riding?

Ursa Minor 03-13-14 06:06 PM

hmmm .... I don't know but good luck.

Charlie

lopek77 03-13-14 06:40 PM

Sounds like a wrong saddle choice to me. I hope you heal quick, and keep a good work with weight loss. You may try to adjust your diet a little for the time you don't ride longer distances, to not to lose your progress. Still, sometimes its better to stop, heal and then come back to your regular rides, instead of keeping reinjuring yourself. Good luck!

spdracr39 03-13-14 07:53 PM

perhaps a different type of exercise while you heal up then try a new saddle. It's possible the one you have is just worn out. You could also consult a physician to make sure there isn't some other problem.

dbikingman 03-13-14 08:31 PM

Consider a different saddle, perhaps a smaller one. The body is supported by the sit bones, if you have a smaller saddle the "tail bone" will be off the back of the saddle. If your "tail bone" is on the saddle maybe the pedaling motion is making it sore.

For "tail bone" I'm thinking of the area at the end of the spine (coccyx) and not the sit bone area.

I hope I explained this clearly enough and not this one time when you don't need pictures.

Cycle Babble 03-14-14 06:13 AM

Greyfeld,
My wife has the same issues. She broke her tail bone many years ago and still has issues when she rides her bike. Her posture on the bike is more of an upright weekend pleasure ride posture and has a wide saddle on her '96 Trek 820. She said she would like to ride more if she can get this problem corrected. I am thinking a smaller saddle may be in order.

I checked with my LBS and they said they have a saddle trial program where she can try multiple saddle until she finds the one that will work. I plan to give this a go this summer and hoping to solve this issue.

Good luck,
John S

MikeRides 03-14-14 09:10 AM

Definitely consult advice from your doctor, as you may have some kind of nerve damage. If you insist on working through it, try a nice pair of padded bike shorts. Makes a world of difference. You may want to listen to the members here and test ride some new saddles while you're at it. Good luck!

Pamestique 03-14-14 09:34 AM

I hear these complaints from time to time... I am just curious, how is a tailbone affected by riding? I have to assume the rider is sitting straight up and down, english dandy style otherwise, there should be no problem at all. The tailbone ends just where one's butt crack starts... perhaps the OP means some other area?

Now if you are just having general low back pain (which I assume you mean), see a doctor, stretch after rides, take Aleve and Tylenol, heat pads generally help. Tylenol makes a pain patch you can wear while riding. Also consider repositioning your riding style. Instead of a comfort bike, consider a real road bike, one where your position is alittle more agressive (ie leaning forward) which will stretch out the back and take pressure off the spine...

Black wallnut 03-14-14 10:37 AM

My vote is find a different saddle, one with a groove down the middle.

WonderMonkey 03-14-14 12:12 PM

Have someone help with your form on the bike to take pressure off that area. You may also need a different saddle, etc. but work on sitting on the bike "better".


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