Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Hammond, La
    My Bikes
    Wabi Lightning RE, Wabi Classic
    Posts
    1,323
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Observations on Eating

    I continue to be amazed at how hard it is to lose weight and keep it off. I've gone from 252 -> 192 and back up to my current 210. This has been over ~4 years. The 4 year mark is when I started cycling as an adult.

    Over the last year, I've begun to pay attention and interview my normal friends, normal being from a BMI POV or damn fit, from my POV. I've avoided folks that are skin and bone and limited it to folks I consider have at least an appropriate amount of muscle. I've further limited this to folks over 40 years old. The way it's turned out, all are cyclists except for one. This is a very small group of 6 folks and not scientific at all. I've taken them out for meals individually without them knowing my "research" was on. I've also asked them for complete daily intakes, after I took them out for meals. Here's what I've learned.

    • None were ever much overweight. Very small sample size here.
    • All but one, don't really pay much attention to what they eat, other than sugar. The one that does thinks he's overweight but most of us here would love to have his body/fat ratio. He's a bike racer and obsessive with body/fat ratios.
    • All of them either didn't eat a great deal of their food or they took to go boxes. When I asked them post meal, all replied they were full and the ones that took to go boxes reported it would last them another meal or two.
    • Four of the group don't pay any attention to meal times or the social aspect of eating. They eat small amounts of food when they're hungry and it's convenient. If not convenient, they just don't eat.
    • Food is a low priority as opposed to me. I think about it all the time.
    • All but one use Alcohol at least once a week, and report they don't eat more when they drink.


    Down here is South Louisiana we don't eat much corporate food. But to put this in perspective the meals they had with me were about like going to Applebees size wise.

    I found the sugar thing interesting, that they all seemed to eat very little of it. For me, to eat like them I'd have to stop paying attention to all the diet fads/theories/religions/systems and just eat way less portions at every meal without fail. I'm not sure I've got it in me, anymore than I can grow a foot taller. I'm going to give it a try, eating less not growing a foot taller

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cycle Babble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    1996 Trek 820 Mountain Bike, 2010 Gary Fisher Tarpon, 2013 Trek Domane 4.5C
    Posts
    166
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    bbeasley,
    I keep hearing on these threads that it is a life style....not a diet. As time goes on, I tend to agree with them. I have been watching what I eat for the last few years and while I am losing weight, I am not losing it fast. Over the last few years I lost about 20+ pounds, and the scale still goes down, but at a very slow pace. Funny thing is I do not feel like I am on a diet.

    Wish you success in your findings,
    John S
    The Declaration of Independence grants me the right to the pursuit of happiness.......I choose that pursuit on my bike.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    On my bike...
    Posts
    256
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Observations on Eating

    My casual observation of my "skinny" friends is similar to yours.

    It seems like those closest to their ideal weights are those that have more of an "I eat because I have to" attitude, as opposed to my "If a little was good, then a lot must be great!" approach.

    I don't feel like I struggle to loose weight, but I am definitely aware of the vigilance I need in order to be successful. With my food preferences, I will always need to pay attention and make choices that are not based on the pleasure of eating one particular food or another.

    Fortunately the longer I stick with it, the more my tastes change, the less food it takes to full, and the more it really is a lifestyle change versus a diet.

    Seeing your body change helps as we'll; success begets success.

  4. #4
    Senior Member spdracr39's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Cabot, Arkansas
    My Bikes
    2012 Trek Madone 5.2, 2012 Giant Composite XTC 29er 1, 2014 Specialized Dolce Sport, (2) 2014 Trek 7.1FX, 2014 Electra Townie 7D
    Posts
    552
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    After a while when you stop eating large quantities at one sitting, sugary foods, and fried fatty foods, you can't even stand to eat that way anymore.

  5. #5
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    NW Minnesota
    Posts
    2,544
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Seems to support the premise that portion control is more important to weight management than any specific "diet", with the exception of limiting sugar (high GI carbs).
    Lead, follow or get out of the way

  6. #6
    Senior Member Ursa Minor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara CA
    My Bikes
    rivendell romulus terratrike rover
    Posts
    554
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree; it seems that portion control is the key.

    Charlie
    Grimly determined to have fun.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    380
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I will confess to being relatively new to being serious about losing weight. I don't have any experience with deliberately trying to maintain a new weight...yet. But here is what I have learned. After being around 165# graduating college, I was about 220# when I started cycling again at around age 35. 9 years later, I had slowly ballooned up to 267#. My eating over that time was very much what was described above as "if a little is good, more is better". I was the guy who ate the extra helping at meals, went back for a refill on the large soft drink, and always finished the last donut or cookie in the lunch room at work. Several times in the last year or two, I had decided to lose weight. I upped my weekly exercise total slightly...I "tried to eat healthy"...I "tried to control portion sizes"...and I "tried to cut back on sugary treats". None of that worked, because I have no will power to resist food without some discernible goal to base my resistance on. I would lose a few pounds over the course of a week or two, my focus and resolve would drift, and within no time I would gain it right back.

    So what has changed? I started tracking what I ate on myfitnesspal. And suddenly I could see on a daily basis exactly which foods were just killing my diet. Some of the things I thought were "eating healthy" were actually quite calorie dense and I was eating lots of them thinking I was doing something good. On February 22nd, I started aiming for 1500 net calories per day, inclusive of exercise. I have been within 100 calories of that goal almost every day since then (one exception was a travel day). I have lost 16 pounds in about 3 weeks and it has been surprisingly easy to do. I rarely feel like I am starving and I rarely feel like I can't eat something when I want to. What has made the difference to me is having a plan (i.e. stay below 1500 calories), knowing what foods are traps for me that will destroy the day's chance to be at 1500 (i.e. large quantities of milk or dairy products, soft drinks, desserts), and making most of my food at home and bringing it in to work. When we do eat out, my wife and I both spend some time checking out options in the food database on the myfitnesspal app when ordering, and I usually immediately cut the food on the plate in half and ask for a to go box to put the other half in. I know that I am going to snack during the day, so I plan that into my food choices. Instead of planning a big bfast and abig lunch and a small dinner and then starving myself all day in between, I shoot for a 300 calorie bfast, a 400 cal lunch, a 400 calorie dinner, and 400 calories in healthy snacks. We cook lots of food on the weekends, then split it up into tupperware servings to be used as lunches during the week. That makes the planning much easier in the morning since I can just grab something from the fridge knowing it will be around 300-400 cals and throw a few snacks in with it.

    What makes me believe that this will be sustainable for me long term is that the knowledge of what foods are gut busters won't go away when I reach my goal weight. I might not count calories every day, but I won't immediately forget how I got where I was. That is the part that is a new lifestyle to me already...along with the cooking foods on the weekend for use during the week. I will let you know how it goes, but even though I am eating 1500 calories a day, I don't really feel like I am dieting right now. I just feel like I am "eating healthy". That is something I plan to make into a lifestyle, long after the calorie counting stops.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Cycle Babble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    1996 Trek 820 Mountain Bike, 2010 Gary Fisher Tarpon, 2013 Trek Domane 4.5C
    Posts
    166
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ^+1

    txags92,
    Way to go. Doing the same thing here. My wife and I cook homemade oatmeal on the weekends for breakfast. We do the recipe with apple, cinimon, and raisins. During the week I will heat up a cup each morning and add some walnuts. For daily snacks I keep some apples, bananas, and a jar of almonds on my desk. For lunch and dinner I have prepacked meals (portion control). A warning is there are a few days I am still hungry after lunch where I will help myself to an extra apple. Either way it seems to be working but at a snails pace.

    The most important thing to me is I am changing my eating habits which is easier to take over a long duration than saying 'I am on a diet'.

    Thanks,
    John S
    The Declaration of Independence grants me the right to the pursuit of happiness.......I choose that pursuit on my bike.

  9. #9
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Hammond, La
    My Bikes
    Wabi Lightning RE, Wabi Classic
    Posts
    1,323
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been reading how some stroke victims are successful reprogramming parts of their brain to take over function from permanently damaged areas. I'm going to attempt to teach my brain to react like a non overweight/obese persons brain. The difference between my situation and a stroke victim is I'll also have to unlearn or forget my current habits.

  10. #10
    Senior Member digibud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Further North than U
    My Bikes
    Spec Roubaix, three Fisher Montare, two Pugs
    Posts
    1,513
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I lost around 40lb before my heart attack and was on a plateau having a hard time losing more. I did it by doing a LOT of biking (I'm retired) and eating better. No dramatic changes but smaller steaks, less butter, less pizza, and more salads and chicken. Then I had a heart attack and learned about my hearts condition and my doc ordered me to become vegan. I loathe the lack of meat and cheese but now I have dropped another 60lb for a total of roughly 100lb in about 2.5 years. I'm glad I did. I'm stronger and healthier than ever before but I admit I miss the food a great deal. On the way to vegan you might consider dramatically reducing meats and cheese and carefully watch your fat/oil intake while doing what you can to up your exercise in whatever way you can.
    Alaskans for global warming.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    380
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I would starve to death in about 2 weeks as a vegan. I have to force myself to eat enough veggies as it is. I have cut back alot on my red meat intake though...more chicken and fish.

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Mid-Atlantic
    My Bikes
    Too many
    Posts
    548
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My typical daily intake and I have no hunger. Just did 30 miles but had a big lunch but no breakfast except my coffee regimen.......390 cals of Sushi. I am not hungry despite only consuming around 500 cals today.

    Breakfast is sometimes three slices of farm fresh bacon and two eggs at the most but I always start the day with protein and fat. Two large coffees with a tablespoon of virgin Coconut oil (no sweeteners)

    Lunch is an argula salad with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, shredded cabbage, and maybe half a carrot. Maybe a bit of dark chocolate.

    Dinner is grass fed beef, fish, local lamb, venision or local chicken. Lots of vegetables....most of my limited carbs are at dinner and they are from vegetables. No grains and no starches like potatoes or rice.

    Water. 2-3 oz of Kefir daily. Green tea. A fruit and protein smoothy every now and then if I need it to fuel
    a ride. A fifth of Jack.

    The key for me is to only eat when hungry, only eat enough to satisfy hunger, and stay off the insulin roller coaster. I get my blood work done in a few weeks. Before starting on losing weight 11 weeks ago, I ate tons of carbs and my lipids were really bad and I refuse going on Statins. I am 30+ pounds lighter. I went from the traditionally recommended diet to a very unhealthy one and I am losing weight. I am willing to bet my blood work out will have my MD's jaw on the floor wondering how I did it.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    On my bike...
    Posts
    256
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by txags92 View Post
    I have cut back alot on my red meat intake though...more chicken and fish.
    For me it was wheat and sugar I had to cut back on. No doubt that fish and chicken are good, but even if I only eat 1350 calories a day, I won't loose weight if those calories are from [predominantly] wheat based or sugary products.

    Going back to the OPs observations, my friends that are thin don't like those foods I do the way I do. Any of my friends that have a flat stomach walk past the doughnuts, pizza, and bread bowl with out a second thought. I can walk past, but I always have the remorseful look back

  14. #14
    Senior Member nkfrench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    My Bikes
    2006 Specialized Ruby Pro aka "Rhubarb" / and a backup road bike
    Posts
    1,466
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My oldest brothers have never been overweight a day in their life. They are not sedentary but they do not perform vigorous exercise.

    I was a big baby and struggled with my weight my entire life. I have several episodes where I lost significant amounts of weight, maintained at a healthy level for almost 5 years, then totally relapsed. My diet has changed substantially over the years to emphasize healthy foods. Portion control is still a challenge. And I always think about food. Other than purposeful exerise (bicycle, swimming, gym), I am quite sedentary.

    My youngest older brother was a chubby kid, but has successfully managed his weight since he was a teenager. He is at a healthy weight & BMI but not as lean as his older brothers.
    His approach is regular moderate exercise (walking, 20 minutes jogging) and strict attention to portion control. He has substituted quality for quantity, all meals are made from fresh ingredients and carefully prepared. His wife is very petite and enjoys fine dining but does not need to consciously monitor her intake as my brother does.

    One of my brothers had some strict mealtime rules for his kids (large family). Plates were served with the tiniest of portions. The kids were required to clean their plates before they could get additional helpings; and even those serving sizes were tiny. There was always enough food that nobody starved, but they were encouraged to push back from the table when they were no longer hungry -- not when they were full. This structure was intended to manage the food budget, ensure that the kids were well-nourished, and eliminate arguments at the dinner table. His wife was slightly overweight when they were childhood sweethearts; but she lost weight after they were married and is still very slender 50 years later. She is in poor health and is intolerant of exercise, so she has a very tiny caloric intake.

    My attitude towards food is very different from the people in my family who have never been overweight. It's like we are from different species.
    Those who were overweight but were successful losing and maintaining that loss over 5 years were living with a person who had never been overweight and have always had to be mindful while eating.
    The ones who have been lean all their life enjoy good foods but only eat when they must; they are not sedentary; and do not understand my attitude towards food.

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NY state
    My Bikes
    See Signature...
    Posts
    1,195
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Weatherby View Post
    A fifth of Jack.
    Now, THAT is a diet

    Cutting carbs and boosting protein has made a big difference for me. 10lbs difference! Exercise, of course, but since cutting carbs back, I'm not as hungry as I used to be. I wonder why? Carbs are very over-rated. Protein and fat are underrated. A salad with 0 carbs (practically) fills me longer than a plate of pancakes (without over-filling).

    Lean protein and Veggies should be your staple, and just enough carbs to keep you going. I've also noticed since cutting back on carbs, I don't really get light headed IF I do get hungry... Hmm...
    2012 Diamondback Podium 2 - Ready for spring! :D
    1995 Specialized Rockhopper Rigid - SS converted!

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    380
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    By cutting back on red meat, I was really referring to its percentage of my protein intake. I actually eat a higher percentage of protein now than before, I just don't get as much of it from red meat. There is some very recent research on gut bacteria that suggests a significant component of heart disease may be related to chemicals produced by a certain gut bacteria in reaction to red meat. My biggest cut by far has been carbs from sugars and starches. I used to drink lots of soft drinks, eat lots of bread and potatoes. Now I eat carbs very sparingly and aim for mostly complex over simple.

  17. #17
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Hammond, La
    My Bikes
    Wabi Lightning RE, Wabi Classic
    Posts
    1,323
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Instead of focusing on what we eat what if we changed our brains reaction to what we perceive as hunger? I don't mean to be dismissive of the above as I have managed to fight my way from morbid obesity to obesity and almost at one point to the coveted over weight status. But all the diets/fads/theories have not changed the reality that I'm still white knuckled to the refrigerator door. Constantly planning and theorizing my next meal. A good example is when I broke my foot last summer, during the months away from running and cycling I quickly gained 25 lbs. It's because all the diet speak and tracking strategies have not changed my under lying over eating habits.

    Is it possible to change, to be more like my fit friends who just don't think about food much? For me it's time to attack the root of the problem and go up the ladder to what drives me to put food into mouth. Or this may be just one more of my iterations into the weight loss abyss.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    380
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Changing what I eat has changed how much I want to eat. I still think about food plenty, but when I start the day with a breakfast high in fat and protein, I am not starvingly hungry by 11am the way I am if my breakfast is donuts and cinnamon rolls. Eating small snacks through out the day keeps me from reaching the level of hunger that used to prompt me to gorge myself at lunch or grab 3-4 vendor provided sugar cookies each time I passed through the kitchen in the afternoon. The only part of my mindset that has changed is keeping my eye focused on the goal. The change to my hunger level and how much I think about food has really come about because of the changes in how I eat, not the other way around.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    153
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bbeasley View Post
    Instead of focusing on what we eat what if we changed our brains reaction to what we perceive as hunger?
    I've been using a plan involving twice a week fasting for the past 6.5 months, down 42 pounds. Twice a week, I go 21-24 hours from the previous evening's meal with water only, then eat a small meal of < 700 calories. Other days aiming for normal intake. No attempt to change type of food eaten other than cutting way back on any drinks containing sugar, change on the other days is just portion size. I kind of feel that this enforced hunger has retrained my perceptions of what is intolerable hunger, what's just thirst, and how much I have to eat to not be hungry. So this has let me trim the amount I eat on the non-fasting days also, and even the fasts went by very easily after the first few weeks.

  20. #20
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Hammond, La
    My Bikes
    Wabi Lightning RE, Wabi Classic
    Posts
    1,323
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by stephtu View Post
    I've been using a plan involving twice a week fasting for the past 6.5 months, down 42 pounds. Twice a week, I go 21-24 hours from the previous evening's meal with water only, then eat a small meal of < 700 calories. Other days aiming for normal intake. No attempt to change type of food eaten other than cutting way back on any drinks containing sugar, change on the other days is just portion size. I kind of feel that this enforced hunger has retrained my perceptions of what is intolerable hunger, what's just thirst, and how much I have to eat to not be hungry. So this has let me trim the amount I eat on the non-fasting days also, and even the fasts went by very easily after the first few weeks.
    Interesting, especially the part about retraining your perceptions!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •