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  1. #1
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    Bike for a returning cyclist -suggestions please

    Hello,

    I just joined the forum today. I am returning to the biking world after an absence of many years. Things have changed for sure since I last rode in then mid 90s technology wise. Give you a perspective on how long it's been, disc brakes weren't even affordable mainstream. Now they are in my budget. Some back ground, due to some health issues that I would rather not get into I have gained a lot of weight - I am over 350 (trying to get it back in control- it's been a long road- please do not judge or put snide comments in here). I am a man trying to take back his health and weight, I need encouragement not hate- and I am pretty feisty with trolls (you have been warned ).

    Doc was ecstatic when I told him about my Desiree to get a bike again. Now I am trying to narrow down the best one to get. I used to ride mt.bikes WAAAAYYY back and to be honest I have been gravitating back to them. I found a DiamondBack Overdrive Sport -29ner hydraulic brakes-disc - really nice bike and rode well. Only prob with the DB is the seat sucks- but I figure that can be changed easily. The DB has an aluminum frame- do those have a weight limit? I haven't really found any good source answer for that- What I don't want to do is plop down $600 on the bike and have it turn to junk on me fast.

    About 2 hours ago I rode a Shift 3 -trek I believe - very nice bike lockout front suspension shock, 21 speed, shock absorber seat- great ride. This bike has solid 26 inch wheels

    The advice I am looking for in comparing the 2 is how well does the DB hold up to my girth vs the shift? Both are great bikes and I am willing and able to fork down the $550 to $700 for a good quality bike - I am not going to walmart for this one! . I like the 29ner on the DB the best, given that I live in a more paved urbanish area I am not wondering if I might better be served in starting off with the Trek Shift 3? Portland also has some off road trails as well which is why I am leaning to the DB.

    Lastly I am looking to cargo options- is it possible to attach sturdy cargo racks for to an aluminum frame bike like the DB and can you pull a trailer with it- long term my vision is to have the bike be a regular mode of around town and some off road transport so having saddle bags and option for a trailer are important to me. I realize this post has been long thank you for reading and I hope I make sense.

  2. #2
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    Welcome to the Forums

    Though a bike is a bike is a bike (for the most part), given your weight, there are some considerations to keep in mind- ones that will probably best answered by the fine folks in our Clydes/Athenas forum.

    Hold on while I move this there...
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  3. #3
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    ... and here we are from General Cycling.
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyril View Post
    Ride what and in what manner pleases you. Those that mind don't matter, and those that matter don't mind. srsly.
    Community guidelines

  4. #4
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    get the one you think you will ride the most. Looks and comfort plays a role here. After you get hooked, you will look for the famous N+1 bike to upgrade to.

  5. #5
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    The Diamondback is a mountain bike. The Trek is a comfort bike. Either could work, but there are many other options. Performance hybrids, touring bikes, even cyclocross bikes.

    Is there a particular reason you want a suspension fork?

  6. #6
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    Metro...most standard road bikes can take your weight. You should confirm, there are a very few high end carbon fibers with limits, but in general, you should be okay. Don't think that you have to have a mountain bike for that.

    As MR2 is inferring, you really only need suspension if you are going to do true 'off road' trails..with rocks and streams and trees. If you plan on riding level, wide trails or horse trails, you could use a hybrid. Suspension adds weight and also introduces a bit of 'movement' in the front fork that you have to learn to manage. So it's best used only if you are really going to be riding around or over things.

    If it's light trail use or, like you said, to be used as an 'around town' bike, you are likely better off with a hybrid or a tourer. Specialized and Trek make bikes (like the Trek FX or Crosstrip) with wider tires and more upright geometry (not 'hunched over' the handlebars like a road bike) and rack ready....you might want to take a look at those.

    Good luck.

    PS...Mr Moderator....please come back. I'm a newbie too with a similar thread in the General section. I could use some towing too

  7. #7
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    The frames and components will hold up. The wheels might struggle, thus, get a bike with wide tires. A hybrid or cross bike is my recommentation.

    The saddle might be worth upgrading immediately.

    Just do it. Like today.

  8. #8
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    Found and bought my new new bike today. Went with a mt bike- timberline gt mechanically actuated disc brakes, front suspension with lockout - sun tour I believe? Has hard mounting points for a rear rack and spots for 2 water bottles in the inner triangle of the frame- very sturdy, 29 inch wheels and I got a suspension seat post and cushion comfy seat. Rides like a dream , the stock seat on it had to be replace it was too small and narrow. So it put a lot uncomfortable pressure on my lower back. The bike rides like a dream- even scored a bulldog lock and a new pair of riding sunglasses with the money I saved going with this versus the other 2 I originally posted and I test drove aloof of bikes the last few weeks till I found this one- I am very pleased with it.
    Total cost out of the dealership- $590 and change.
    now thinking of cargo racks fenders lights and saddle bags- I guess the addiction has begun

  9. #9
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    That's a decent bike, but be prepared to buy a new seat post at some point soon--those suspension posts don't last very long at Clyde weights. Ask the bike shop to properly tension the spokes (wheels and Suspension are The weak points).
    "I had this baby hand made in Tuscany, from titanium blessed by the pope. It weighs less than a fart, and costs more than a divorce..."

  10. #10
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    Good to know thanks, I am hoping that the weight issue won't be for too long as I am endeavoring to loose. The bike shop did a full once over on it before I took it home so I assume that included spokes to- anyway I can check at home to make sure they are adjusted properly?




    Quote Originally Posted by Erwin8r View Post
    That's a decent bike, but be prepared to buy a new seat post at some point soon--those suspension posts don't last very long at Clyde weights. Ask the bike shop to properly tension the spokes (wheels and Suspension are The weak points).

  11. #11
    Senior Member MRT2's Avatar
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    Congratulations on your decision. Now get out and ride. I concur about the suspension seatpost, as I am generally not a fan of those for us clydes, but that is an easy switch for down the road. Get two bottle cages, as it is important to stay well hydrated, especially going into the summer months.

    I have mounted racks on most of my bikes. While you can probably get away with using a seatbag and stuffing things in a jersey pocket, a rack adds versatility for carrying tools, extra food and water, or a rain jacket.
    Look for something along the lines of this style, if not necessarily this particular model.
    Planet Bike Eco Rear Mount Bicycle Rack - Silver - 4002 - Rakuten.com Shopping

    Alternately, Topeak and Bontrager have rack and bag systems that fit together. It isn't strictly necessary, but it is cool to just snap the bag in and go, as opposed to securing it with straps and velcro. Your choice either way.

  12. #12
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    Awesome!!! Welcome aboard, now that you have a bike all there is left is to ride like the wind!! I lost 42 pounds from biking and nutrition last year and have another 20 to ditch this year. While the bike you have is great and will serve you well, most of us have realized that the "Next" bike is always better.

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