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  1. #26
    Senior Member RollCNY's Avatar
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    OP,
    Not to be impolitic, but if you gained 100 lbs, you are probably outside of the optimal weight range for most stock wheels. They will hold you, but will be more maintenance prone.

    Your description reads to me like you have two different goals: go far (tour) and go fast (Ironman). So go into this to address both in the long term.

    If it were me, I would:
    1. Buy hand built 36 or more spoke wheels. I would go into it with a $5-600 budget, get nice serviceable hubs, double butted spokes, and a touring width rim.
    2. Put these wheels on your Specialized with tires that will fit in the frame, and go to town.
    3. As the weight comes off, figure out which of your next priorities hit first. Personally, my tastes would run touring first, and the hand built wheels will serve as great touring wheels after the weight is off.
    4. If you can, hold off on the "go fast" bike until you are 190 ish. That seems to be the cusp between nice light wheels and Clyde built wheels.

    Enjoy your return to the sport, and good luck with the weight loss.

  2. #27
    Senior Member clausen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc3 View Post
    I haven't read a thread filled with as much claptrap as this one in several days...some of you are treating OP like he's a total newb, and he's not...suggesting that "high end" bikes and components of the type he's considering have weight limits that impact his choices...the only good advice I see here is along the lines of "get the best comfortable "re-starter" bike that fits for around $3K" which for my money is probably a Giant Defy Advanced (ask for an upgrade to Ultegra and decent wheels if need be).

    Bottom line, if you're dipping your feet back into cycling, then it makes sense to get a mid-range bike in the $3K....it'll be good enough that you can enjoy cycling again, it may be upgradeable, so find a color scheme you can live with for the long term, and a LBS that you have a "relationship" with may take it back in trade after a year or so....

    All my statements here are purely the opinion of the author and have no basis in fact...
    All bikes have weight limits. The few High end frames or wheels that I could find max weight specification are between 200-220 pounds. So unless the OP is 220 and 100 pounds over weight his weight does effect his purchase. Of course you do say "All my statements here are purely the opinion of the author and have no basis in fact... "

  3. #28
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    Roll, thanks for the note. I have no real desire to do real touring (with panniers or randonees) but I would hope to ride a century this year (at least a metric). So I think a true touring bike (with the relaxed geometries) are probably not for me. But a crit racing or tri bike geometry is probably not right either...somewhere in between. But you are absolutely right about the wheels...I will likely splurge for a custom wheelset on the new bike.

    The fast will come eventually...the Ironman was my last 'milestone birthday' goal, but I tore a bunch of ligaments in my ankle during my run training (due to a congenital defect in my foot). I assume I will likely 'trade up' before I get to that goal, which is probably another 5 years out.

    And folks, simmer down about the bike weight limits. Of course I would check this out before purchasing and choose the correct bike. I'm not stupid. And I don't plan on buying a high end carbon frame where most of the weight limits resides.

    Mods, given that I can't PM you, if you see this, please move this over to the Clydesdale forum before I get char-roasted.
    Last edited by TechieTechie; 03-30-14 at 08:42 AM.

  4. #29
    Just Plain Slow PhotoJoe's Avatar
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    Moved to C/A, per OP's request.
    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is not the sport for you!

  5. #30
    Senior Member clausen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechieTechie View Post
    I'm under the standard weight limit that I've read about for most road bikes (and just at the edge for Specialized's carbon seat posts), and I'm sure as h$ll not going to ride a hybrid or cross bike...I'm way beyond that in cycling ability, even in the shape I'm in. 2 years ago, I rode a 200 mile, 2 day trip on my current Specialized Allez (was I slow, yes, did I finish, absolutely). But even when I was in shape, I do love (and have no shame in riding) a triple up front. I like to keep a good 90 cadence (I try never to go below 85) going up even the steepest hills if I can help it (and it sure came in handy riding in the hills of Galicia and New Hampshire).

    Softrest..thanks for the comment. That's good to hear that you are still riding with the same frame. Helps me get my mind around this.

    GC...thank you...well said! And I agree with you. I'm looking in the $2-$3k range, enough to get a pretty decent ride, but one that I won't kick myself if I want to trade up.
    If your under the weight limit than buy the best you can afford. The only reason I suggested a cross was because of the 100 pounds you mentioned you needed to lose. An extra 100 could put some well above weight limits.

  6. #31
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    Clausen..thank you for the thoughtful response. Sorry I got a bit bent out of shape (hah hah). It's been frustrating as all get out as I can't seem to shake the loss of desire to get back into shape. These ten years have been stresfull as h%ll with 3 major surgeries, a parental death, buying a death trap house, and working a professional services job, usually working 60-70 weeks, away from home Mon-Thursday.

    And some of those responses seem to forget the fact that I'm a pretty experienced rider. So my apologies if I was a little abrupt with you. No offense meant and I appreciate your kind reply. I'm looking at a closeout Independent to see if it fits. Otherwise, I'm gonna head to the LBS (after it stops raining) to see what's new

  7. #32
    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Well, all anybody here has to go on is what you posted so don't get too bent out of shape if somebody makes a bad assumption. I'm not one to go low end either (if I can help it) even if I'm not going to "benefit" from it.

    I'm not sure what your weight is, but as long as you're under say, 275, there are a lot of options open to you. Wheels are the tricky spot.

  8. #33
    Packfodding 3 caloso's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RollCNY View Post
    OP,
    Not to be impolitic, but if you gained 100 lbs, you are probably outside of the optimal weight range for most stock wheels. They will hold you, but will be more maintenance prone.

    Your description reads to me like you have two different goals: go far (tour) and go fast (Ironman). So go into this to address both in the long term.

    If it were me, I would:
    1. Buy hand built 36 or more spoke wheels. I would go into it with a $5-600 budget, get nice serviceable hubs, double butted spokes, and a touring width rim.
    2. Put these wheels on your Specialized with tires that will fit in the frame, and go to town.
    3. As the weight comes off, figure out which of your next priorities hit first. Personally, my tastes would run touring first, and the hand built wheels will serve as great touring wheels after the weight is off.
    4. If you can, hold off on the "go fast" bike until you are 190 ish. That seems to be the cusp between nice light wheels and Clyde built wheels.

    Enjoy your return to the sport, and good luck with the weight loss.
    Spot on. Even after the weight comes off, you'll appreciate the reliability of well-built, if slightly heavier wheels.

    Land after you get in some miles, check out the sticky threads at the top of the 33 forum to get some information about racing.
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  9. #34
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    Find a 2013 Trek CX Ultimate at closeout for around $3k or less. Great frame and excellent components......better than Ultegra in my opinion. Ride it hard for a year and celebrate by buying the fast eye candy.

    Trek Cronus CX Ultimate (Gary Fisher Collection) - Trek Bicycle Superstore

    BTW....this is a cross bike. You can put very fast, handmade wide clinchers on it and it will be killer for those long rides you want to do.

  10. #35
    Senior Member WonderMonkey's Avatar
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    If you would ride the mid get that one then use the high end bike as a reward for losing the weight.
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  11. #36
    Senior Member WonderMonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechieTechie View Post
    Roll, thanks for the note. I have no real desire to do real touring (with panniers or randonees) but I would hope to ride a century this year (at least a metric). So I think a true touring bike (with the relaxed geometries) are probably not for me. But a crit racing or tri bike geometry is probably not right either...somewhere in between. But you are absolutely right about the wheels...I will likely splurge for a custom wheelset on the new bike.

    The fast will come eventually...the Ironman was my last 'milestone birthday' goal, but I tore a bunch of ligaments in my ankle during my run training (due to a congenital defect in my foot). I assume I will likely 'trade up' before I get to that goal, which is probably another 5 years out.

    And folks, simmer down about the bike weight limits. Of course I would check this out before purchasing and choose the correct bike. I'm not stupid. And I don't plan on buying a high end carbon frame where most of the weight limits resides.

    Mods, given that I can't PM you, if you see this, please move this over to the Clydesdale forum before I get char-roasted.
    Different brands are coming up with an "endurance" class that is for these longer distances. It's also what I'm aiming for and is the bike I just recently purchased for. I'm not in your price range but I get a Raleigh Revenio 2.0. That bike may not be for you but is the "style" that you are describing.

    Raleigh Bicycles - Endurance Revenio

    Consider getting a nice bike in this class then beefing up a set of rims.
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  12. #37
    Senior Member nkfrench's Avatar
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    Speaking as an Athena on a women's specific better bike - the full Dura Ace groupset doesn't care how much I weigh and the bike has been a joy to ride.

    I have put a beam rack on it to do lightweight commuting and fully-supported touring (incl RAGBRAI), and that would have put me 100# over the bike's target weight audience.
    I did make a few concessions. The c/f seatpost got switched to alloy (accommodating the beam rack); I chose a different saddle; MTB pedals for my SPD shoes.
    The original DuraAce alloy rear wheel developed a single crack but it was just spoke tensioning error at 10,000 miles. I have 8,000 miles on the DuraAce carbon/aluminum warantee replacement wheelset.

    There's nothing like a bike that is fun to ride and won't hold you back. I later purchased a backup "beater" bike with AL frame and 105 components, similar geometry. It isn't fun to ride.

  13. #38
    Senior Member FlatSix911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TechieTechie View Post
    I'm under the standard weight limit that I've read about for most road bikes (and just at the edge for Specialized's carbon seat posts), and I'm sure as h$ll not going to ride a hybrid or cross bike...I'm way beyond that in cycling ability, even in the shape I'm in. 2 years ago, I rode a 200 mile, 2 day trip on my current Specialized Allez (was I slow, yes, did I finish, absolutely). But even when I was in shape, I do love (and have no shame in riding) a triple up front. I like to keep a good 90 cadence (I try never to go below 85) going up even the steepest hills if I can help it (and it sure came in handy riding in the hills of Galicia and New Hampshire).

    Softrest..thanks for the comment. That's good to hear that you are still riding with the same frame. Helps me get my mind around this.
    GC...thank you...well said! And I agree with you. I'm looking in the $2-$3k range, enough to get a pretty decent ride, but one that I won't kick myself if I want to trade up.
    Techie,
    Since you are an experienced rider and prefer Steel or Titanium frames, check out BD.

    Shimano Ultegra 6800, 22 Speed Titanium 2014 Le Champion SL Ti $2,199
    Save Up To 60% Off Shimano Ultegra 6800 Road Bikes - 2014 Le Champion SL Ti
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  14. #39
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clausen View Post
    If you need significant weight loss look at Cross bikes with road tires on it. The frame can handle your weight, wider tires for your weight and lower gearing to help you get over the hills. You can pick one up relatively inexpensive and it gives you allot of versatility. Keep looking at high bike and pick one up when the weight comes off.
    Maybe in northern Ontario Cross bikes are relatively inexpensive, mine cost me only a few hundred less than my discounted carbon Roubiax. I also looked at a Surley cross check for less money but with bar end shifters not worth the lower price. Cross gearing is not what I would consider clyde friendly unless one lives in flatland like Florida. Sure the top end is lower but the low end is much higher. 38x28 or 30 is not nearly as fun up hill as 34x30 or even 32.

    Price and gearing aside TechieTechie cross bikes are still worth a look. My Crux feels very stiff and racy, with road tires I have good sprint times and they do seem to come with upgraded wheelsets.


    Mark

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black wallnut View Post
    Maybe in northern Ontario Cross bikes are relatively inexpensive, mine cost me only a few hundred less than my discounted carbon Roubiax. I also looked at a Surley cross check for less money but with bar end shifters not worth the lower price. Cross gearing is not what I would consider clyde friendly unless one lives in flatland like Florida. Sure the top end is lower but the low end is much higher. 38x28 or 30 is not nearly as fun up hill as 34x30 or even 32.

    Price and gearing aside TechieTechie cross bikes are still worth a look. My Crux feels very stiff and racy, with road tires I have good sprint times and they do seem to come with upgraded wheelsets.

    The OP has the capability to replace a 38 ring with a 34. Plus, Boston all the way out towards Worcester is flat.

    A cross bike with two sets of wheels is the Swiss Army knife of road bikes.

  16. #41
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    I love steel and ti bikes (De Rosa, Merckx, and have had a number of Merlins and Serottas)--I now have a ti Carbon bike (Seven ID8), an aluminum bike (Klein Pro) and a Carbon bike (Element Six frame with Campy Record stuff). The carbon bike is stiffer than all the rest, rides better, and is more comfortable on longish rides (tbh, my longest ride to date has been 30 miles). Carbon frames are now the standard--they can be made to be as stiff as the worst aluminum frames you remember, or as soft as the noodle Columbus SL stuff of my youth. Steel is nice, but carbon is just too good to ignore (weight, ride tunabiity, etc.). Do yourself a favor and at least check out the carbon offerings from Cannondale/Trek/Specialized. There are a few 2013 bikes left over at serious bargains with great components (Cannondale SuperSix with 105 or Ultegra, for example). A Supersix with Ulegra and a set of custom wheels would still be under 3k (based on the $1599 price my friend just paid for his 105-equipped SuperSix)... Just my .02
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  17. #42
    Senior Member Retired2013's Avatar
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    Congrats on getting back into biking. Have you considered a fixed gear? I had a nice one built for 2K and it's a lot of fun. I am about 260!

  18. #43
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    TechieTechie,
    Given your level of experience, it sounds like you won't be happy with a mid-end bike. If you trust your LBS, maybe a good strategy would be to find the high-end bike you can love, then discuss with their mechanic what, if anything, you need to do to "ruggedize" the bike until you shed some pounds.
    This might give you the quality you're accustomed to while still giving you some "weight loss rewards" as you get to put on the lighter components (e.g., carbon seat post, low spoke-count wheels) that can't handle Clyde-like weights.

    In any case, I hope you enjoy your re-entry to cycling!

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Retired2013 View Post
    Congrats on getting back into biking. Have you considered a fixed gear? I had a nice one built for 2K and it's a lot of fun. I am about 260!
    How did you spend 2k on a fixie?

  20. #45
    Senior Member Retired2013's Avatar
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    Sullatlo,

    I had it built. A Surly Cross Check with White Industries hubs and drive train, Mavic Open Pro, wheels Brooks B17 saddle, wooden fenders... It was a retirement present to myself. It is a nice ride.

    Chris

  21. #46
    Senior Member WonderMonkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sullalto View Post
    How did you spend 2k on a fixie?
    Tassels.
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  22. #47
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    iduno if stay mid price will match what you really want....Go upper mid class, something like a Venge Comp w/ Ultegra for 3k then put some nice wheels on it w/ high upper weight limits like Zipp 303s/404s

    That should be enough bike to last a good 5 yrs or so til you get tired of the looks....paint is always cheaper then new bikes too... will be hard to out ride a bike like that though

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  23. #48
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    I have almost as much weight to lose as you do OP, -- and we have a similar riding background ---- I raced track for a decade --

    Sheesh - some of you guys are talking about "getting down to 190, then getting race wheels " --- - I was 210 pounds with 9% bodyfat and regularly riding spindly 16 hole fronts, radial laced wheels, early generation carbon spokes , and all sorts of things the Clydes think is inadequate on my road bikes (the old Shamals were admittedly pretty stout though ) --

    I was entertaining the same questions you are -- go high end, or just get something else to get me out riding again --

    I went for a carbon Cannondale Synapse --- I have a big enough belly it was interfering with getting in the drops --- The Synapse is a "comfort bike" , but the frame has been used in Paris-Roubaix, much like the Specialized bike Boonen rides ---- but one glance at my stem stack will tell you i have room to play with if i drop some weight

    --- contrast that with the frightening amount of spacers on my old bike (pictured below) - can you imagine putting that many stem spacers on a Dura Ace equipped Litespeed -- but hey, it is what it is --- even with all the handlebar adjustment in the world , my Litespeed, , which i had logged thousands of miles on in the past, felt like a torture rack - (i even bought that carbon fork so i could have more steerer height to play with -- the one on it originally was a Reynolds Ouzo cut flush )

    -- even with seat/handlebar height the same between the 2 bikes , the Litespeed was unbearable for rides over 15 miles -- i suspect its the angle of the seat tube


    Remarks so far? -- The Cannondale is fast -- as a former 210 pound trackie, i am sensitive to bottom bracket flex, but the BB30 system C'dale uses (and many others) is great
    -- also ---- sheesh -- bikes are expensive -- i have usually been able to wrangle a pro deal on my bikes in the past , but let your weight sneak past 250 pounds and watch all those "pro deals" disappear --- i thought i was going to be priced out of the market
    I stumbled onto a decent deal on this Synapse at a year end price (i had been looking at the Specialized Roubaix's primarilly) -- took for a test ride and was hooked --- the riding position is a little faster than the Roubaix but still comfortable

    I got a 105 equipped bike -- and no, the 105 shifters are not smooth , - not even close to the 10 yo D-A stuff on the other bike, but i made some concessions for price ----

    I am very comfortable with the notion of riding this thing for a year and selling it if i reach my weight loss goals --- but on the other hand, - i like the upright positioning and compact gearing enough that even if i can get into another "race bike" (and i have an affinity for the carbon Colnago's) -- its worth having around for hilly century rides and things like that --

    Wheels? They;re basic Shimano 105 level wheels --- but i haven't been able to ding 'em yet . I did switch the tires out for a much more comfortable 28c open tubular , and the seat is much more booty friendly now -- but thats it





    Last edited by DMC707; 03-31-14 at 10:33 AM.

  24. #49
    Senior Member MattFoley's Avatar
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    IMO, unless you're racing or riding for money, I don't know how you can "grow out" of a mid-range $3k bike. I think above that price point, any true gains in stiffness/handling/durability/overall performance are extremely minimal, and the drive to upgrade becomes primarily driven by some combination of weight-weenie/shiny new toy desire (not that there is anything wrong with either of those). That's not to say that you wouldn't enjoy Ti over CF or Ultegra over 105 or whatever, but that's more of a personal choice rather than a purely performance-driven decision. All that said, I don't judge anyone (well, I do sometimes) who buys the best bike they can afford, even if that's "more bike than they need." But to answer your question of "will I grow out of this $3k bike?" I'd say "most likely not." Will your preferences change or will you want to buy something "nicer"? If you're like me...probably.
    Cars man, whyyyyyy?!?!?!?!

  25. #50
    Senior Member Retired2013's Avatar
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    nope! Couldn't find any in solid gold.

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