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  1. #1
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    Tubulars for Clyde's? Or is that a laughable notion.

    Any opinion on tubulars for Clyde's? I rode 'em years ago when I was a svelt 215 without problems. I'm working on dropping the weight from 300+ back to a more reasonable 240ish and was considering building up a set... or resurrecting an old set. I always used 36 hole for everything anyway, but I am seriously wondering about riding them once I drop another 20 pounds and get down to about 260. I've been out of the game for a good 25 years, but I have no doubt that I could easily build the wheels. It's just a question of whether there's an alloy tubular rim that's strong enough for a pachyderm....
    I'm just a worn out black & white striped Clydesdale....

  2. #2
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    I bought my carbon 50 tubs when I was 220. Still have them and straight as a good arrow.

    But the non carbon ones are popular for CX racers. Velocity Major Toms seem to be pretty popular, 20-36hole rims on what ever hubs fit your bike.


    BUUUUUUT

    Now there are wider clincher rim profiles that gives the same tubular road feel but clincher and even tubeless (stans sealant or similar). Almost best of both worlds for every day riding

    Pacenti Sl23
    Velocity A23
    hed belgium

  3. #3
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    I was actually just looking at the Velocity Major Tom's on ProWheelBuilder.com... I ran through their custom build program just to see what it said thinking that maybe I could get them built up and save me some work (or not depending on whether I would want\need to re-tension and true them up). It's not like I NEED another set of wheels right now. It's more that I want to stay off of some of my old wheels while I am 20-30% heavier than when I last used them.

    Project wise, I have a new pair of Campy Victory Strada rims that I could build up if I chose. They are probably 25 years old and never used. I bought them in the early 1990's with the intention of lacing them up with Ultegra or Dura-Ace. I would need to buy spokes and hubs for them as I can't seem to find what I bought for the project back then. IIRC, the Victory Strada were the "heavier" rims but they are still a pretty standard box rim so I don't know how well they would hold up compared to the Major Tom's. I might build them up to sell or sell them as is to fund something else. If they won't be strong enough for me.

    I know that there are some really good clinchers out there, heck - they were coming onto the scene 25 years ago when I stopped riding, but I still have a preference for the tubs. Either way I'm giving serious consideration to running something like Stan's sealer in whatever ends up being the daily use wheels....
    I'm just a worn out black & white striped Clydesdale....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeyref View Post
    Any opinion on tubulars for Clyde's?.
    For a comparable rim weight and number of spokes, tubular wheels would be more robust than clinchers.

    Impacts are the things that will cause pinch flats and rim dings; this is more likely for a clyde. Simply due to the design of the rim, tubulars are far more resistant to these failures. Also, tubulars can be pumped up to higher pressures without the risk of the rim walls blowing out. Higher pressures help protect against impacts.

    As far as rims, I would go with some heavier weight rims such as the old GP4s. 36 spokes obviously.

    Then match these with some fatter tires, such as smooth 28 or 32mm 'cross tires. Vittoria made (makes?) a tire called the "Normal Cross" that I use in 28. Plush ride and more protection.

  5. #5
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    I noted Cycling News thought it was noteworthy when a few teams without a wheel company sponsor .
    brought out the same Ambrisio Hard anodized 32 spoke conventionally laced 3x wheels

    they used the year before . at the start of the Paris Roubaix race.. to use again ..

    Mavic only has 1 left of that type Reflex | Mavic - United States

    Extruded , welded seam machined, then CD anodized ..

  6. #6
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    Dave,
    I HATED clinchers back in the 90's because of pinch flats n such. I never had an issue once I started riding the tubs.... Everything that you stated are reasons why I like(d) tubs. I just don't have a good feel for what's strong enough to support my fat ass. I had only one set of wheels with less that 36 hole rims. They survived a month or two while I was "only 215 lbs" - granted they were NOT great wheels being the stock wheels that were OEM on my 1987 Schwinn Tempo, but I have to invest in building new wheels pretty quick. I will always use 36 hole, the weight just isn't that big of a deal for me and the riding I will be doing.
    I'm just a worn out black & white striped Clydesdale....

  7. #7
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hockeyref View Post
    but I still have a preference for the tubs. Either way I'm giving serious consideration to running something like Stan's sealer in whatever ends up being the daily use wheels....
    I was very hesitant on tubeless on roadie though I had super success on all my MTBs with it. But drank the kool-aid and I have a set of Stan Alpha 400 on some older neuvation ceramic hubs and bladed spoke. VERY freaking reliable wheels... Two worn out tire changes and ZERO flats. Over 3000 miles of hard/fast club rides and even some hard pack dirt/gravel road adventures in the 6 months I had them on the bike. Pressure wise, easy 5-7psi less air needed then normal tubed clinchers. Softer ride comfort and nice handling w/ more contact on the tarmac. It's nice to be that guy on the club rides and not have to worry about flats unless I slash the tire for some super rare reason. The Stans A400s, are still a standard narrow rim, to get best of both worlds would be the SL23 or A23's which both can be ran tubeless.

    Both rims cost roughly the same, most of the wheel build cost is determined by hubs and if you want to spend $150 more on bladed spokes or stick w/ double butted. SL23 have a taller aero profile so it does have added stiffness and aero advantages over a certain MPH.

  8. #8
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    I love tubulars for the same reasons some of you have already pointed out --- plus, being a trackie, the clinchers can sometimes just feel "weird"

    That said --- if you are stuck on clinchers for practical reasons, but love tubulars ---- Compass Cycles sells some beautiful open tubulars (link below) -- an open tubular is basically a tubular casing , but slit with clincher beads inserted for use on a clincher ( they are about the best ride a clincher is going to get -- Vittoria also makes the Open Corsa , which is a clincher version of the Corsa tubie)

    Compass Bicycles: 700C Tires

  9. #9
    Senior Member breadbin's Avatar
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    i still have nightmares about my experiences with tubs! will stick to clinchers and wouldn't recommend tubs but you know what they're about already. i used tubs back in the 90's when i raced a little bit. had so many punctures with them, the hassle of unglueing, unstitching, fixing the puncture and then the cat-gut, glueing back on etc. i must have been doing it wrong! i had mavic GP4 rims with shimano 600 hubs. beautiful wheels but didn't really work out for me
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  10. #10
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    Seriously, give tubeless a good look. The Bontrager Race wheel line is Tubeless ready, and without a ride weight limit (I think.)
    2011 Schwinn Madison
    2012 Trek Madone 4.7

  11. #11
    got the climbing bug jsigone's Avatar
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    I run about and ounce of Stans sealant in my tubs and never had a flat tire in about 3000 miles.

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