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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 04-09-14, 07:45 AM   #1
pudge1990
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New Clydesdale

Hello everyone,

Should start off by saying I have lurked the site a tonne over the last couple of weeks preparing to purchase my first bike since I was in middle school!

Just wanted to introduce myself as I have been bitten by the biking bug.

In December I started a journey to lose weight and get back into shape I started at 281.6 Pounds which is still about 15 pounds lighter than I have been at my heaviest. I have since lost almost 40 pounds using Jenny Craig and hitting the gym hard over the winter. With the warm weather coming though I have decided to get out there and bike my butt and gut off. I really have enjoyed seeing what people post in this forum and hope to actively contribute to the forum.

I have bought a Giant Roam 3 as a starter bike (Figured buying a road bike might be a little to steep of a learning curve) and I am in the process of changing out a few parts already, I have new pedals on the way and am looking at moving to a smoother higher pressure tire.

I am also looking to purchase a mountain bike when the tax return comes in as my buddy just picked one up and is looking to get into that this summer.

Just did my first real ride last night on a local trail and here are the stats:

Distance: 18.3 KM's
Avg. Speed: 20.2 KPH
Max. Speed: 36.5 KPH
Elevation Up: 59 M
Elevation Down: 57 M

All of these stats were taken from the runtastic road biking app which I am really enjoying and highly suggest you check out.

I am wondering how good or bad these stats are as I am fairly new to biking any help deciphering the numbers would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks and I look forward to getting to know all of my fellow big riders.
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Old 04-09-14, 07:56 AM   #2
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Hello and welcome!

Nice first ride ... 12 and a half mph isn't anything to hang your head over. Keep riding, and keep riding faster. You'll get faster

This morning I averaged 13.6 on my commute ... though I wasn't pushing terribly hard because it was in the low 30s when I started out. On my road bike I generally average 15 mph or so though right now I'm still getting my outdoor legs

Don't worry about measuring yourself against others though ... ride to beat yourself ... meaning, make each ride better than the last if you can. We all have off days though, and just as well, we all need days off. Listen to your body, and have fun!
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Old 04-09-14, 08:30 AM   #3
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Welcome to BF! Wow 40 lbs. down, that's great.

Don't sweat the numbers, just keep riding and you'll see the results.
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Old 04-09-14, 09:36 AM   #4
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I am also looking to purchase a mountain bike when the tax return comes in as my buddy just picked one up and is looking to get into that this summer.
You can probably just use the Roam for your initial mountain biking with the stock tires - use it until you have some idea what, if anything, you'd want different. You (hopefully) aren't going to be doing anything to over the top until you get a little experience with it, anyway. On mountain bikes various features aren't necessarily there for the reasons a non-mountainbiker would think. Suspension is there to keep the wheels on the ground, for example, comfort comes from learning to correctly use your legs.

My first few times on decent single-track were tough. Not body wise, but brain wise. My heart rate was sky high because I had to overthink everything. Takes a bit of doing it before your brain can just settle in on the things that actually matter instead of worrying about every root or tree.

18km is a good distance for a first real ride, doesn't matter what pace. Like others have said, speed comes with practice. Though the perfect smoothness of fresh asphalt with low resistance tires on a road bike seems to magically give me an extra couple mph.

That's a good start. Don't really think about speed much, and don't try to increase distance too fast. The guideline is generally 10% per week in increase, but that doesn't help at the very beginning because you don't know where you should be, so like ill.clyde said, listen to your body.
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Old 04-09-14, 09:51 AM   #5
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You can probably just use the Roam for your initial mountain biking with the stock tires - use it until you have some idea what, if anything, you'd want different. You (hopefully) aren't going to be doing anything to over the top until you get a little experience with it, anyway. On mountain bikes various features aren't necessarily there for the reasons a non-mountainbiker would think. Suspension is there to keep the wheels on the ground, for example, comfort comes from learning to correctly use your legs.

My first few times on decent single-track were tough. Not body wise, but brain wise. My heart rate was sky high because I had to overthink everything. Takes a bit of doing it before your brain can just settle in on the things that actually matter instead of worrying about every root or tree.

18km is a good distance for a first real ride, doesn't matter what pace. Like others have said, speed comes with practice. Though the perfect smoothness of fresh asphalt with low resistance tires on a road bike seems to magically give me an extra couple mph.

That's a good start. Don't really think about speed much, and don't try to increase distance too fast. The guideline is generally 10% per week in increase, but that doesn't help at the very beginning because you don't know where you should be, so like ill.clyde said, listen to your body.
I am looking at getting into the mountain biking thing pretty intensely. I grew up playing all kinds of sports so I am pretty athletic for a big guy (most people dont believe I am 240 seeing me run or skate) the trails I would be looking to hit right off the bat I would think would tear up the roam pretty quickly. I am also thinking by having a dedicated riding and seperate mountain bike I can upgrade parts a little bit easier without having to compromise between road manners and MTB agression.
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Old 04-09-14, 09:53 AM   #6
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I am also wondering what kind of a difference I would see by going to a smoother tred tire that can hand a little more air pressure that my current stock tires. Will this make some difference in terms of speed. for what its worth I am riding on 700-40C tires that are somewhat knobby and I see that giant makes a smoother tire that is still the 700-40c size but can also hold 10 PSI more air which I am thinking would cut down some of my rolling resistance.
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Old 04-09-14, 11:36 AM   #7
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Except for an all out sprint I can go just as fast on my hybrid with 38 tires as on my roadbike with 23/25 and my CX bike with 32. I can go farther faster with the road bike, then the CX bike and lastly the hybrid. Higher air pressure may make the ride a bit better and somewhat faster, I'm really not sure.
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Old 04-09-14, 01:10 PM   #8
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Less rolling resistance = less friction = faster ... however, the gains from a tire switch at this point wouldn't be huge.

What's important now is riding ... base miles. Get your legs in order, and the rest will work itself out
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Old 04-09-14, 01:18 PM   #9
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What kind of progression would you suggest for someone who is just starting to ride. I would like to improve as quickly as I can and I feel as though I already have fairly strong legs underneath me but really looking to take my biking to the next level.
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Old 04-09-14, 01:57 PM   #10
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Great to be cycling, right?

You should do whatever motivates you, but based on my personal experience...

For now, since you are riding for fitness, don't be worried about spending money to get faster tires, you will just end up seeing your usual routes a little more often. Don't worry about what others do, take your current stats, and use them as a baseline to measure improvement.

You are already riding faster and further than many beginners, or some people trying to recover from a tough winter, like me. Going with a higher pressure slick will in addition to reducing rolling resistance also potentially make your ride harsher as far as bumps and road buzz... This may make your time on the bike less fun.

Of course, if you are trying to keep up with someone you ride with, that is a motivation to try to increase the speed.
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Old 04-09-14, 02:08 PM   #11
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What kind of progression would you suggest for someone who is just starting to ride. I would like to improve as quickly as I can and I feel as though I already have fairly strong legs underneath me but really looking to take my biking to the next level.
Take the same ride, possibly the one you posted occasionally, and each time set a goal for improvement. i.e. target an average of 21 kph the next time. Don't even look at max speed, that is probably due more to terrain than fitness.

On rides in between, maintain a steady level of exertion for most of the ride, but throw in some higher intensity portions, either hills, or sprints. I tend to like increasing the distance on a weekly basis as well, but again, that can be changed by terrain etc...

That is what I have done for success (when I have improved) along with rest days... initially rest days are completely off the bike, and later as I gain fitness, a few rest days could be easy rides. But you need rest to build up long term.

If you want to get REALLY serious go to the training forum to find out about all the varieties of tests you should do to determine your lactate threshold, max heart rate,, VO2 max, and several other measurements in order to fine tune and train like the pros... But honestly, for the first year, just put in as many miles as you can at a moderate exertion, and make sure to mix in some hard miles...
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Old 04-09-14, 02:28 PM   #12
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Welcome Brother,

You couldn't possibly ask for a more supportive and friendly group of people ! As a new cyclist and struggling fat guy mysslef I don't know what to say to help you other than KEEP IT UP ! GOOD LUCK !
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Old 04-09-14, 02:37 PM   #13
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Take the same ride, possibly the one you posted occasionally, and each time set a goal for improvement. i.e. target an average of 21 kph the next time. Don't even look at max speed, that is probably due more to terrain than fitness.

On rides in between, maintain a steady level of exertion for most of the ride, but throw in some higher intensity portions, either hills, or sprints. I tend to like increasing the distance on a weekly basis as well, but again, that can be changed by terrain etc...

That is what I have done for success (when I have improved) along with rest days... initially rest days are completely off the bike, and later as I gain fitness, a few rest days could be easy rides. But you need rest to build up long term.

If you want to get REALLY serious go to the training forum to find out about all the varieties of tests you should do to determine your lactate threshold, max heart rate,, VO2 max, and several other measurements in order to fine tune and train like the pros... But honestly, for the first year, just put in as many miles as you can at a moderate exertion, and make sure to mix in some hard miles...
+1
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Old 04-09-14, 07:30 PM   #14
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Just finished my second ride and already am seeing improvements

distance: 24.3 km
total time: 1:07:13
avg. Speed: 21.7 kph
max. Speed: 37.7 kph
elevation up: 97 m
elevation down: 95 m
calories 833

i feel great and already a huge sense of accomplishment
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Old 04-09-14, 09:51 PM   #15
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Okay, just wondering what country's language uses "tonne," measures distance in klicks, yet offers its citizens tax returns...
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Old 04-10-14, 06:51 AM   #16
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Let's not forget free healthcare lol
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Old 04-18-14, 08:07 PM   #17
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We'll the weather finally co operated again so I was able to get out today. Had a small fall on an ascending corner little bit of sand on the path I ride and tire just slid out, a little road rash but I'm alright.

I have changed a few things up on my bike I got smaller more road like tires which has helped big time with rolling resistance. I also cut down My bars by 3/4 of an inch on either side and added climbing bars.

anyways I'm rambling here's the ride stats

distance: 32.3 km
duration: 1:33:50
avg speed: 20.7 kph
max speed: 34.8 kph
elevation up: 103 m
elevation down: 102 m

it was a good ride
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Old 04-21-14, 12:49 PM   #18
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Absolutely beautiful riding day today 16 degrees and partly cloudy I had lots of time today so I decided to just ride until i was too tired to anymore.

Here are the stats from today's ride:

distance: 39.8 km
duration: 1:54:31
avg speed: 20.9 kph
max speed: 35.8 kph
elevation up 162 m
elevation down 161 m
avg pace: 2:52
calories: 1333

new personal best for me and really enjoyed the trail !
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Old 04-22-14, 01:13 PM   #19
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Had my first taste of riding in the wind today. I'd say gusts were probably between 30 and 35 kph which made my route into the wind tough. Anyways here are the stats

distance: 19.8 km
duration: 57:23
avg speed: 20.7 kph
max speed: 37.5 kph
elevation up: 67 m
elevation down: 65 m
calories: 660
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Old 05-06-14, 01:20 PM   #20
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Got out for a fun ride after teaching junior golf clinics all day here are the stats

duration 2:09:20
distance 44.2 km
avg speed 20.5 kph
max speed 40.2 kph
elevation up 139 m
elevation down 137 m
calories 1464
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Old 05-06-14, 04:11 PM   #21
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Welcome to the best forum on the Net!
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Old 05-08-14, 11:38 AM   #22
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Well two days of lacrosse and hockey now got back on the bike today and it felt good.



distance: 44.9 km
duration: 2:09:56
avg. speed: 20.7 kph
max speed: 40.8 kph
elevation up: 171 m
elevation down: 170 m
calories: 1496 calories
avg pace: 2:54
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Old 05-20-14, 08:56 AM   #23
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Got out for a quick ride Sunday night

duration: 53:52
distance: 19.3 km
avg. Speed: 21.4 kph
max speed: 36.8 kph
elevation up: 56 m
elevation down: 54 m
calories 655
avg pace: 2:48 min/km

On a side note after Sunday nights ride I hiked about 10 km on Monday and felt great. All of this riding is making a big difference!
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Old 05-20-14, 09:15 PM   #24
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The biggest changes are not on the scale, nor can you see or feel them...
The effect of exercise on your health and how well you age is immense!
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Old 05-21-14, 05:55 AM   #25
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I am also wondering what kind of a difference I would see by going to a smoother tred tire that can hand a little more air pressure that my current stock tires. Will this make some difference in terms of speed. for what its worth I am riding on 700-40C tires that are somewhat knobby and I see that giant makes a smoother tire that is still the 700-40c size but can also hold 10 PSI more air which I am thinking would cut down some of my rolling resistance.
Panaracer Pasela are a good and probably the cheapest option for durable, fast, wide tire.

Fast tires are more a function of the side walls and the casing although knobbies are obviously slower on pavement than slicks of equal design. Fast tires are not cheap.

700 C Bicycle Tires from Harris Cyclery (ISO/E.T.R.T.O. 622 mm)

Compass Bicycles: 700C Tires
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