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Thread: Hotspots

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    Hotspots

    Has anybody used inserts in their tennis shoes to deal with hotspots? I don't use cleats because of knee problems and I have a pair of shoes that I really like It's not about the shoes! What I think I need are ones that are very stiff.

    Phil

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    I WILL BE YOUR LARRY arex's Avatar
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    I use Superfeet insoles in all my boots. Very stiff and supportive, though not cheap.
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    Senior Member 1speeder's Avatar
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    Even with super stiff soled cycling shoes I can get hotspots when the temperatures get to 90 degrees plus. The worst time it happened to me was on a double century and I ended up taking out the shoes inserts to gain a little more room in the shoe for my swelling feet (hit 112 degrees that day). I learned that in summer months to wear a pair of shoes at least one size larger to prevent the hotspots So, with tennis shoes, keep the shoe laced slightly loose, if that doesn't help, try one of those plastic inserts which should help place the load uniformly under your feet. Or, maybe you should try some stiff MTB shoes without the cleats, they might be hard to find in your color though

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    Um, it's about the shoes. I ride flat pedals and shoes for my commuter bikes, mt clipless for off road. Tennis shoes are not stiff enough. Try a sport mt bike shoe with no clip. There is a whole industry for this, BMX and downhill mt bikers use the flats and shoes combo. I like keen shoes and sandals, very stiff and comfortable. Make sure your pedals are big enough for you with enough pins. Try chrome, vans and 661. Lots of choices out there. What pedals are you using now?

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    Senior Member decotriumph's Avatar
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    I use PF Flyers "Center Lo" model as my riding shoe and they work great. They are canvas, so they breathe, and have a flat sole and a supportive insole. The "PF" in PF Flyers stands for "posture foundation." PF Flyers | Authentic American Style is their website and they always have some on sale. Right now, they have three different colors for $24.99 a pair (reg. $54.99).
    Alan M.
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    Thanks everybody for your input. Really it's not about the shoes - It's about the "color of the shoes" If I was to do the "sensible thing" I would get a pair of mt bike shoes and maybe that would solve my problem.

    To answer Leebos question: What pedals are you using now? VP Components VP-990A Flat Pedal ? Reviews, Comparisons, Specs ? Mountain Bike Flat Pedals - Vital MTB I think they could be a big part of the reason. Yesterday at the 3 hour mark of a 4 hour training ride my feet started to get hot spots mainly on the balls of my feet. I think that if I got a platform that was solid that might help some.

    What I saw that I really liked was this Windjammer Slip-On - PFFlyers - US Next time the Clydes do GMR, on a Saturday, I want to go to the "village" and see if my friend is there and see the shock on her face when I tell her that I'm going to ride to the lifts in my "PF Flyers"

    Ok, back to the topic again thanks for all your help and if anybody has any info on inserts that would help.

    Phil

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    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Re:
    What pedals are you using now?
    Ergon Pedals ERGON BIKE ERGONOMICS

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    Quote Originally Posted by HuffinandPuffin View Post
    Has anybody used inserts in their tennis shoes to deal with hotspots? I don't use cleats because of knee problems and I have a pair of shoes that I really like It's not about the shoes! What I think I need are ones that are very stiff.

    Phil

    Ride Safe
    Hi Phil,

    One option may be to look at how your shoes are laced. I have a very high instep/arch and will have hotspots when new shoes have "normal" lacing. However, there are different ways to lace shoes that remove hotspots based on your foot shape. Runners and exercise walkers use different lacing patterns to make their shoes more comfortable and remove hot spots. Google "athletic lacing patterns" for some sites - here's my favorite Ian's Shoelace Site - Shoe Lacing Methods. I use "straight bar" for my arches.
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    TractorLegs,

    Thanks for that website.

    Phil

    Ride Safe

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    Those pedals are not nearly big enough. Almost every bike company makes a flat pedal with replaceable steel pins. Prices go up for less weight and thinner ones. 50$ should get you something decent. Start there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
    Those pedals are not nearly big enough. Almost every bike company makes a flat pedal with replaceable steel pins. Prices go up for less weight and thinner ones. 50$ should get you something decent. Start there.
    +1

    Alternatively, look at the Speedplay pedals and real bike shoes. The Speedplays will have enough float that you won't risk locking your feet in at the wrong angle, and the bike shoes will have a stiff sole that will help with hotspots.

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    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Running shoes are rotten cycling shoes. I can say this with authority because that's what I've been using all week, although I haven't gone further than 20 miles and my feet have mostly been OK in them.

    Check out the bike I've been riding too (this is a crappy beach rental bike!) I did manage to average over 17 mph on the local bike path yesterday, so I'm thinking I may need to trade in my roubaix. It has funky oblong chainrings, the crank arms are too short and the frame is way too small - I don't feel stable standing up on this thing but on a perfectly flat road I can get it going.

    But yes, stiffer shoes for you. My wife used to use hiking shoes for cycling, that worked out OK.

    rental bike.jpg

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    Just Plain Slow PhotoJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuffinandPuffin View Post
    Really it's not about the shoes - It's about the "color of the shoes"
    Couldn't agree with you more. If it weren't for those shoes, I doubt we would have had that nice conversation with those women at the village that day! Talk about a conversation piece!
    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is not the sport for you!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    Check out the bike I've been riding too

    rental bike.jpg
    So Huff&Puff finally convinced you to go to the triple, huh?
    If at first you don't succeed, Skydiving is not the sport for you!

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    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJoe View Post
    So Huff&Puff finally convinced you to go to the triple, huh?
    And sneakers too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    Running shoes are cycling shoes. I can say this with authority because that's what I've been using all week, and my feet have mostly been OK in them.

    Check out the bike I've been riding too. I did average over 17 mph on the local bike path yesterday, so I'm thinking I may need to trade in my roubaix. I feel stable standing up on this thing and on a perfectly flat road I can get it going.

    But yes, running shoes are for you. My wife used to use hiking shoes for cycling, that worked out OK.

    rental bike.jpg
    This is what I got from your post

    "Wait for me at the top"

    Phil

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    SuperGimp TrojanHorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuffinandPuffin View Post
    This is what I got from your post

    "Wait for me at the top"

    Phil

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    Hey, they're your hotspots.

  18. #18
    Senior Member IBOHUNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    Running shoes are rotten cycling shoes. I can say this with authority because that's what I've been using all week, although I haven't gone further than 20 miles and my feet have mostly been OK in them.
    Wait. What? You have 'running' shoes?

    Quote Originally Posted by TrojanHorse View Post
    Check out the bike I've been riding too (this is a crappy beach rental bike!) I did manage to average over 17 mph on the local bike path yesterday, so I'm thinking I may need to trade in my roubaix. It has funky oblong chainrings, the crank arms are too short and the frame is way too small - I don't feel stable standing up on this thing but on a perfectly flat road I can get it going.

    But yes, stiffer shoes for you. My wife used to use hiking shoes for cycling, that worked out OK.

    rental bike.jpg

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  19. #19
    Senior Member LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Are you running clips and straps?

    If not, get some nice BMX pedals. Even super-cheap Odyssey Twisted PC are rather nice pedals.

    Get some trail running shoes that have a tread that'll really lock in to the pins. They're typically stiffer than regular running shoes but not overly heavy.

    Or just get some Vans. They lock in to the pins pretty well.
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    One thing that I did use on a century ride that did work is a product called "Moleskin Plus Padding." In looking for inserts I did find this insert that I really like BIKEPRO | currexSole

    Phil

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    A big issue that is totally under reported for us larger guys is the issue of Q-factor. Q-factor is the distance between the pedals. Generally racers want that to be as small as possible because it's more aerodynamic. If you have hips like 120lbs Andy Schlenk, then that probably works for you. If you have wider hips like most of us, it probably doesn't.

    Too narrow of a Q factor can cause you to pedal inwards from your hips to the narrower pedals. Depending on how you're put together, this can cause all sorts of issues with shoes, knees and hips. Took me a long time to figure it out, but I finally did and all my feet problems went away.

    First off, you can wedge your shoes using stuff from BikeFit (BikeFit). This works for most people. I needed an insane amount of wedging on my left foot and nothing on my right.

    If you need to widen your Q-factor you can test it out by riding a mountain bike that typically has a wider bottom bracket than a road bike. If you don't get feet problems there, then that could be likely culprit.

    If you need to change your Q factor, far and away the best choice for pedals is speedplay. They offer longer spindles in five (I think) sizes. No one else does. In addition, their cleats have a lot of side to side adjustment anyhow.

    Currently there is not a good mtb pedal that allows for adjustable q factor but Speedplay (if they ever release it) with their Szyr pedal is supposed to also offer adjustable spindles for their pedals.

    J.

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