Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/)
-   -   I got a bike finally !! (http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdales-athenas-200-lb-91-kg/953027-i-got-bike-finally.html)

mrodgers 06-11-14 06:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WestMichiganGuy (Post 16840799)
Again, I am not here to stroke your ego or prove anything to you. Secondly, as someone who was partially disabled for years after returning home from deployment, has not been on a bike in 20 years, and is over 350 lbs, I am doubting I would be riding 100 miles in a week on any bike or of any make whatsoever. You are just getting petty, stupid, and trying to be annoying now.

How about you come back to me with your God bike after you rode a wheelie off a 45 foot drop and did 3 backflips on the way down and maybe, just maybe, I will change my opinion about your bike.

Don't worry about him. I'll say, I am doubting you won't be back telling us how you've made your first 10, 20, 30 mile ride or rode 100 miles in a week. Join the monthly goal thread here. It is started every month. There are people with 50 mile monthly goals to 700 mile monthly goals. It's a great motivator.

One of my biggest pet peeves is the "BSO" or "Bike Shaped Object" title the bike snobs puts on department store bikes. I'm sure no one who rides one thinks it's the greatest bike out there. They are what they are, a cheap bike, but they are bikes. Chevys are cheap pieces of junk too, but I've never heard of them being called ASO's or Auto Shaped Objects in the automotive enthusiast world.

Last year I was quite vocal about what I was riding and the condition it was in. Of course, I was wanting something better, but it was what I had and it got me on a bike. It also lost me 30 lb. in 3 months. My bike was a Walmart dual suspension mountain bike I bought for $99 in 2005 to have something to ride a mile or 2 on the bike trail with my then 5 year old daughter as I taught her to ride a bike. It ended up buried in the corner of the garage for at least 5 years when my daughter who had then turned 11 two years ago at 5'2" tall, wanted to ride a bike again and she couldn't ride her old 2nd bike anymore. I dusted it off for her to ride around in the yard with her younger sister on her old bike. This was last summer. It was left out in the rain all the time and was even buried in the snow all winter long out in the yard.

The beginning of last spring when the snow and ice thawed out, I brought it back into the garage. The chain was completely frozen with rust. She wanted to ride around the yard again, so I sprayed the chain with PB Blaster for a couple of days and worked the chain loose. She rode it around in the yard, again leaving it out overnight in the rain all the time.

At the end of summer, I was looking for something to do with exercise. A few coworkers were riding mountain bikes (Bikes Direct bikes that they just bought) on the bike trails. I thought maybe I'd try it out. The Walmart job wouldn't shift gears and was in terrible shape. All the cables were frayed, it was bad. I read a bit about adjusting everything and disassembled the brakes and deraileurs. This is the first time I had touched adjusting anything on the bike. I wasn't going to put any money into it with the frayed cables and everything so I adjusted the best I could. I cleaned all the deraileur stuff and got it shifting again. Got the brakes working again and headed out on my own on the bike trail.

So here it is for MRT2. I rode 3 months on that bike which was already 7 or 8 years old and previously left out in the rain and snow. I kept it on a trunk mount bike rack on my car rain or shine to ride after work. I rode at least 12 miles every day I could trying to get about 100 miles a week in. I rode a few times 16 then 18 then 26 miles. I had to put a new tube in each tire to start, but other than that, all I did was do the best I could with adjusting the deraileurs and brakes. I had never done anything previously even when I bought it to the bike. The front and rear gear teeth are all practically round because they are worn well past worn-out. I'm sure the chain is stretched to Canada and back. It is terribly uncomfortable, but it got me riding and in those 3 months, on a very worn out 8 year old Walmart bike, I rode 580 miles. That was between the starting weight of 247 to the end weight of 220.

If I kept up with it, I was going to buy a new bike in the spring. I did just that. Riding that Walmart bike allowed me plenty of time in the saddle thinking about what I wanted. I went out and bought my Giant Escape 1. If not for a $99 Walmart bike purchased 8 years ago to ride a mile with my 5 year old daughter, I probably wouldn't be riding a bike for exercise now.

I hope you thoroughly enjoy the bike. I hope to hear your progress in the near future. The progress comes fast. You may tell us tomorrow how you rode 3 miles and most of us will give you a "great job!" Next week, you'll be telling us how you rode 10 miles, then 15, then 20. I hope to see you jump into the monthly goal thread. You'll enjoy it and next year we'll be hearing about your new Cannondale Quick or Fuji Absolute, Giant Escape, Trek FX, or perhaps we'll hear about your new road bike. The $85 spent will show you what you want and don't want.

Note, stick around with this Clydes/Athenas forum. It is a great bunch of folks here who will only encourage you. Compared to most of the rest of Bike Forums, this is the most encouraging and caring group of folks on the forum (toss the Hybrid and 50+ sections in there too, not much snobbery in those areas either.) Good luck and can't wait to hear how you're doing. I was you just 11 months ago.

MRT2 06-11-14 06:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrodgers (Post 16840901)
Don't worry about him. I'll say, I am doubting you won't be back telling us how you've made your first 10, 20, 30 mile ride or rode 100 miles in a week. Join the monthly goal thread here. It is started every month. There are people with 50 mile monthly goals to 700 mile monthly goals. It's a great motivator.

One of my biggest pet peeves is the "BSO" or "Bike Shaped Object" title the bike snobs puts on department store bikes. I'm sure no one who rides one thinks it's the greatest bike out there. They are what they are, a cheap bike, but they are bikes. Chevys are cheap pieces of junk too, but I've never heard of them being called ASO's or Auto Shaped Objects in the automotive enthusiast world.

Last year I was quite vocal about what I was riding and the condition it was in. Of course, I was wanting something better, but it was what I had and it got me on a bike. It also lost me 30 lb. in 3 months. My bike was a Walmart dual suspension mountain bike I bought for $99 in 2005 to have something to ride a mile or 2 on the bike trail with my then 5 year old daughter as I taught her to ride a bike. It ended up buried in the corner of the garage for at least 5 years when my daughter who had then turned 11 two years ago at 5'2" tall, wanted to ride a bike again and she couldn't ride her old 2nd bike anymore. I dusted it off for her to ride around in the yard with her younger sister on her old bike. This was last summer. It was left out in the rain all the time and was even buried in the snow all winter long out in the yard.

The beginning of last spring when the snow and ice thawed out, I brought it back into the garage. The chain was completely frozen with rust. She wanted to ride around the yard again, so I sprayed the chain with PB Blaster for a couple of days and worked the chain loose. She rode it around in the yard, again leaving it out overnight in the rain all the time.

At the end of summer, I was looking for something to do with exercise. A few coworkers were riding mountain bikes (Bikes Direct bikes that they just bought) on the bike trails. I thought maybe I'd try it out. The Walmart job wouldn't shift gears and was in terrible shape. All the cables were frayed, it was bad. I read a bit about adjusting everything and disassembled the brakes and deraileurs. This is the first time I had touched adjusting anything on the bike. I wasn't going to put any money into it with the frayed cables and everything so I adjusted the best I could. I cleaned all the deraileur stuff and got it shifting again. Got the brakes working again and headed out on my own on the bike trail.

So here it is for MRT2. I rode 3 months on that bike which was already 7 or 8 years old and previously left out in the rain and snow. I kept it on a trunk mount bike rack on my car rain or shine to ride after work. I rode at least 12 miles every day I could trying to get about 100 miles a week in. I rode a few times 16 then 18 then 26 miles. I had to put a new tube in each tire to start, but other than that, all I did was do the best I could with adjusting the deraileurs and brakes. I had never done anything previously even when I bought it to the bike. The front and rear gear teeth are all practically round because they are worn well past worn-out. I'm sure the chain is stretched to Canada and back. It is terribly uncomfortable, but it got me riding and in those 3 months, on a very worn out 8 year old Walmart bike, I rode 580 miles. That was between the starting weight of 247 to the end weight of 220.

If I kept up with it, I was going to buy a new bike in the spring. I did just that. Riding that Walmart bike allowed me plenty of time in the saddle thinking about what I wanted. I went out and bought my Giant Escape 1. If not for a $99 Walmart bike purchased 8 years ago to ride a mile with my 5 year old daughter, I probably wouldn't be riding a bike for exercise now.

I hope you thoroughly enjoy the bike. I hope to hear your progress in the near future. The progress comes fast. You may tell us tomorrow how you rode 3 miles and most of us will give you a "great job!" Next week, you'll be telling us how you rode 10 miles, then 15, then 20. I hope to see you jump into the monthly goal thread. You'll enjoy it and next year we'll be hearing about your new Cannondale Quick or Fuji Absolute, Giant Escape, Trek FX, or perhaps we'll hear about your new road bike. The $85 spent will show you what you want and don't want.

Note, stick around with this Clydes/Athenas forum. It is a great bunch of folks here who will only encourage you. Compared to most of the rest of Bike Forums, this is the most encouraging and caring group of folks on the forum (toss the Hybrid and 50+ sections in there too, not much snobbery in those areas either.) Good luck and can't wait to hear how you're doing. I was you just 11 months ago.

And now you are riding a Giant Escape.

I respect what you did because you actually followed through on biking, which is no small feat given the sorry condition of the bike you started with last year. If memory serves, last year, you had to drive your bike to the local MUP because the hills near your house were too steep. This year you ride up those hills.

I had a similar exchange with Greyfeld last year. Anyone remember him?

MRT2 06-11-14 06:26 AM

http://www.bikeforums.net/clydesdale...get-shape.html

Here is OP's original post, in case anyone on this thread thinks I was unfriendly or unwelcoming.

Gnosis 06-11-14 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WestMichiganGuy (Post 16840207)
There is my little ray of sunshine ! And I am sure you only ride on gold lined, quadruple wall wheels blessed by the tears of circumcised children and the blood of albino cows. That is, IF it has a name brand on it as well..

:lol:

Null66 06-11-14 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrodgers (Post 16840901)
One of my biggest pet peeves is the "BSO" or "Bike Shaped Object" title the bike snobs puts on department store bikes. I'm sure no one who rides one thinks it's the greatest bike out there. They are what they are, a cheap bike, but they are bikes. Chevys are cheap pieces of junk too, but I've never heard of them being called ASO's or Auto Shaped Objects in the automotive enthusiast world.

Analogy is flawed.
Chevy's are not bad cars. They're just not a brand that strokes your ego.

More like a Yugo or a first generation Hyundai, better then walking but in the end very short design life and disposable. Where the analogy fails is these bike will be quite reasonable if you work on it yourself...

AND I AM GLAD HE GOT THE BIKE!
Getting going before he gets discouraged...

A person in his position will start out riding reasonable distances. 2 miles would be a huge accomplishment which I personally would love to celebrate when he posts it! 5 miles is some time off... One thing that grinds my gears about people is how people denigrate their own successes. EVERY mile he does improves his health but the first rides are the most important and have outsized effects on his health. And with out the short rides, there will be no longer rides.

Keeping it going. Will give him the confidence (and buy the time) he needs to get a more serviceable bike off of CL.

Catastrophic wheel failure is NOT what happens with these or even how a wheel fails.
26'' wheels with mountain bike tires are unlikely to collapse. What might happen is he break a spoke, the wheel wobbles and hits brakes and he stops and either loosens brake and limps home, or he pushes it... NOT REALLY A BIG DEAL or safety issue unless you're way out there on an extremely hot day w/o water... I had just this thing a front wheel bearing fail on a fuji tourer (with about 1500 on it) about 15 miles from home... Walked/hitch hiked home... Really sucked as I ran out of water miles before. Turns out it was a bad batch of wheels.

Brakes will be unacceptable for adequate stopping distances on downhills at a decent clip. But frankly my first Schwinn Traveler had this flaw, especially when it rained due to steel (chromed) wheels.

Shifting will require more fiddling to keep it functional. Entirely doable.

Maybe, he'll get fed up with the annoyances of increased maintenance and then look on CL.

BUT He'll have made massive progress...

Look at the PC he's building, he can definitely turn a wrench!

MRT2 06-11-14 08:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Null66 (Post 16841267)
Analogy is flawed.
Chevy's are not bad cars. They're just not a brand that strokes your ego.

More like a Yugo or a first generation Hyundai, better then walking but in the end very short design life and disposable. Where the analogy fails is these bike will be quite reasonable if you work on it yourself...

AND I AM GLAD HE GOT THE BIKE!
Getting going before he gets discouraged...

A person in his position will start out riding reasonable distances. 2 miles would be a huge accomplishment which I personally would love to celebrate when he posts it! 5 miles is some time off... One thing that grinds my gears about people is how people denigrate their own successes. EVERY mile he does improves his health but the first rides are the most important and have outsized effects on his health. And with out the short rides, there will be no longer rides.

Keeping it going. Will give him the confidence (and buy the time) he needs to get a more serviceable bike off of CL.

Catastrophic wheel failure is NOT what happens with these or even how a wheel fails.
26'' wheels with mountain bike tires are unlikely to collapse. What might happen is he break a spoke, the wheel wobbles and hits brakes and he stops and either loosens brake and limps home, or he pushes it... NOT REALLY A BIG DEAL or safety issue unless you're way out there on an extremely hot day w/o water... I had just this thing a front wheel bearing fail on a fuji tourer (with about 1500 on it) about 15 miles from home... Walked/hitch hiked home... Really sucked as I ran out of water miles before. Turns out it was a bad batch of wheels.

Brakes will be unacceptable for adequate stopping distances on downhills at a decent clip. But frankly my first Schwinn Traveler had this flaw, especially when it rained due to steel (chromed) wheels.

Shifting will require more fiddling to keep it functional. Entirely doable.

Maybe, he'll get fed up with the annoyances of increased maintenance and then look on CL.

BUT He'll have made massive progress...

Look at the PC he's building, he can definitely turn a wrench!

Yup, that is how it happens. And so you replace the spoke and retension the wheel, or pay a bike shop to do it if you don't have the proper tools, and hope that it isn't a recurring problem.

Null66 06-11-14 08:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MRT2 (Post 16841314)
Yup, that is how it happens. And so you replace the spoke and retention the wheel, or pay a bike shop to do it if you don't have the proper tools, and hope that it isn't a recurring problem.

I paid up to have my 40 spoke fuji redone a couple times, I now ride on 48 spoke PW tandem with Disc brakes... Over kill, yep but always gets me home! Love the silent freehub and SO smooth!


Learned a lot from my Fuji:
Over 30 my canti's on the Fuji just countered the acceleration on the steeper hills. Before the techno grouch apologists chime in, yep had a number of mechanics try to address this... yep, koolstops...
Horizontal dropouts? Who knew a 285 lb weight lifter could tear the axle free (regardless of skewer) by accelerating in a tall gear, forget coming out of the saddle...
But It a was a comfy bike!

PhotoJoe 06-11-14 08:57 AM

OP - one thing I haven't seen mentioned here is that box-store bikes are usually MUCH heavier. We pay more for lighter bikes. So what. OK, so your bike may be 10 lbs. heavier than a higher-end "name brand". At our weights, is 10 lbs. on the bike REALLY that big of a deal? Congrats on the bike. Have you taken it out yet?

raqball 06-11-14 09:06 AM

All this drama because the OP spent with his own $$ on a Walmart bike? I can maybe understand all this drama if you personally gave him the $$ with the understanding that he buy a <insert brand here> bike.

There was a guy that rode half the Southern Tier on a $99 Walmart Fixed gear bike.. He has a Youtube video blog of it..

Some of you should be ashamed at how you act on the internet and I certainly hope this is not how you act in life away from the keyboard. The OP has done nothing to you, he did not spend your money, and has already said that he knows it's not the best bike in the world..

Man sometimes Bike Forums can really get out of hand.. If you don't like the OP's choice then get out of his thread! He has already asked nicely once but I guess some still have anger in them that needs to be vented and the OP is their current target.

Sad, really sad.

MRT2 06-11-14 09:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Null66 (Post 16841379)
I paid up to have my 40 spoke fuji redone a couple times, I now ride on 48 spoke PW tandem with Disc brakes... Over kill, yep but always gets me home! Love the silent freehub and SO smooth!


Learned a lot from my Fuji:
Over 30 my canti's on the Fuji just countered the acceleration on the steeper hills. Before the techno grouch apologists chime in, yep had a number of mechanics try to address this... yep, koolstops...
Horizontal dropouts? Who knew a 285 lb weight lifter could tear the axle free (regardless of skewer) by accelerating in a tall gear, forget coming out of the saddle...
But It a was a comfy bike!

Not taking any chances, I see.

What do you mean by tear the axle free? Did the wheel come clean off or did it just shift a little?

Null66 06-11-14 09:37 AM

The drive side would slide forward and the leading edge of the other side of the wheel would jam into chain stay. Locking the rear wheel.

I forgot myself once at an intersection and sprinted a bit to beat a car. It wouldn't have been too close until the bike stopped dead... Fortunately the car stopped as well.

I tried probably a dozen mechanics advice: 105 skewers w/o springs, DT SWISS ratcheting mountain bike skewers, and on and on.. Everything except switching to solid axle (bolt). I really don't want to carry a wrench for the real wheel...

I spent too much trying to overcome the Fuji's problems, this, braking while moving fast on hills loaded... and twisting the old style threaded headset... But I really liked the fuji, all day comfortable, day after day.... When you're as slow as I am, comfort takes on a new meaning.


So built up a Disc trucker and it has been marvelous. I chose build as I like STI's, wanted lower touring type gearing, and me and default pack was over their weight limit. I've since lost 20 lbs, too much of that muscle... So now have decent breathing room.

Only irritation with my DT is I get a noise in drive train i haven't figured out yet...
It happens when I torque up on each pedal down stroke. It "might" be the skewer I have in now, which is for the fluid trainer.
Will replace with the DT skewer to rule that out.

Chances? I don't relish a walk home... I can be 50 miles from home at times.

Solare 06-11-14 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia (Post 16840419)
Good grief, a new cyclist come here to share the joy of his new bike purchase. All of the sudden this happy occasion turns into a long-winded discussion about what bike the OP should have bought, dire predictions about his wheels falling apart in mid ride and some sort of a challenge to ride more than just a few miles around the block.

OP, enjoy your new bike, have fun riding it and pay no attention to the nattering naboobs of negativity. You will know when you are ready to move to the next level of cycling. When you do, you may wish to consider donating your bike to the local bike co-op where it will make a great bike for yet another new rider.


Thanks for the signature quote.

MRT2 06-11-14 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eja_ bottecchia (Post 16840419)
Good grief, a new cyclist come here to share the joy of his new bike purchase. All of the sudden this happy occasion turns into a long-winded discussion about what bike the OP should have bought, dire predictions about his wheels falling apart in mid ride and some sort of a challenge to ride more than just a few miles around the block.

OP, enjoy your new bike, have fun riding it and pay no attention to the nattering naboobs of negativity. You will know when you are ready to move to the next level of cycling. When you do, you may wish to consider donating your bike to the local bike co-op where it will make a great bike for yet another new rider.

Spiro Agnew. Nice. :roflmao2:

capsisking 06-11-14 09:54 AM

That's a good start :-)

MRT2 06-11-14 09:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Null66 (Post 16841582)
The drive side would slide forward and the leading edge of the other side of the wheel would jam into chain stay. Locking the rear wheel.

I forgot myself once at an intersection and sprinted a bit to beat a car. It wouldn't have been too close until the bike stopped dead... Fortunately the car stopped as well.

I tried probably a dozen mechanics advice: 105 skewers w/o springs, DT SWISS ratcheting mountain bike skewers, and on and on.. Everything except switching to solid axle (bolt). I really don't want to carry a wrench for the real wheel...

I spent too much trying to overcome the Fuji's problems, this, braking while moving fast on hills loaded... and twisting the old style threaded headset... But I really liked the fuji, all day comfortable, day after day.... When you're as slow as I am, comfort takes on a new meaning.


So built up a Disc trucker and it has been marvelous. I chose build as I like STI's, wanted lower touring type gearing, and me and default pack was over their weight limit. I've since lost 20 lbs, too much of that muscle... So now have decent breathing room.

Only irritation with my DT is I get a noise in drive train i haven't figured out yet...
It happens when I torque up on each pedal down stroke. It "might" be the skewer I have in now, which is for the fluid trainer.
Will replace with the DT skewer to rule that out.

Chances? I don't relish a walk home... I can be 50 miles from home at times.

I have done that. LBS concluded it is just an under tightened quick release. Hasn't happened again, but it is something I am watching.

eja_ bottecchia 06-11-14 09:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Solare (Post 16841599)
Thanks for the signature quote.

You are welcome. Wish I owned the copyright to that. :innocent:

eja_ bottecchia 06-11-14 10:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MRT2 (Post 16841634)
Spiro Agnew. Nice. :roflmao2:

Well, thank you.

Now, why can't you let the dude enjoy his new bike and stop harshing his mellow. Let it go.

As far as I can recall, the OP posted here to share his joy at joining the ranks of cyclists not to be pissed on by someone criticizing his first bike purchase. I now own and ride some of the finest bikes available shod with some of the finest equipment. But my first bike in the USA, yes I am an immigrant, was a department store bike that I bought used for $100.00. To me, back then, that bike was better than the finest Colnago, Bianchi or Bottecchia--it was MY bike and it took me places.

I think that is how the OP felt when he posted here. He understands that a Wally bike will have some shortcomings compared to what a Tour rider rides. But it is HIS bike and it made HIM happy to buy it and it will make HIM even happier to ride the heck out of it.

I can't speak for the OP, but if I were him I would strongly suggest that you keep your criticism to yourself and I would strongly encourage you to go ride a a saddle-less bike with a pointed seatpost.
@Null66, Chevy makes some fine cars...wish I could afford a new Vette. :D

eja_ bottecchia 06-11-14 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by raqball (Post 16841432)
All this drama because the OP spent with his own $$ on a Walmart bike? I can maybe understand all this drama if you personally gave him the $$ with the understanding that he buy a <insert brand here> bike.

There was a guy that rode half the Southern Tier on a $99 Walmart Fixed gear bike.. He has a Youtube video blog of it..

Some of you should be ashamed at how you act on the internet and I certainly hope this is not how you act in life away from the keyboard. The OP has done nothing to you, he did not spend your money, and has already said that he knows it's not the best bike in the world..

Man sometimes Bike Forums can really get out of hand.. If you don't like the OP's choice then get out of his thread! He has already asked nicely once but I guess some still have anger in them that needs to be vented and the OP is their current target.

Sad, really sad.

I couldn't have said it better myself.

Null66 06-11-14 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MRT2 (Post 16841655)
I have done that. LBS concluded it is just an under tightened quick release. Hasn't happened again, but it is something I am watching.

Yep, tighter was better.
Bent the skewer before the 105.
My best on a squat machine was 819... W/o a cage, most I would dare was a double at 550.

Quantity has it's own quality...

MRT2 06-11-14 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Null66 (Post 16841745)
Yep, tighter was better.
Bent the skewer before the 105.
My best on a squat machine was 819... W/o a cage, most I would dare was a double at 550.

Quantity has it's own quality...

:thumb: Impressed. Maybe try less hammering, more spinning on the bike.

WestMichiganGuy 06-11-14 10:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhotoJoe (Post 16841398)
OP - one thing I haven't seen mentioned here is that box-store bikes are usually MUCH heavier. We pay more for lighter bikes. So what. OK, so your bike may be 10 lbs. heavier than a higher-end "name brand". At our weights, is 10 lbs. on the bike REALLY that big of a deal? Congrats on the bike. Have you taken it out yet?

Yeah, not much of a chance as I got it yesterday and it started raining last night and is on and off raining today but I got about a half mile on it between a few laps around the block here and then went to in laws and changed the saddle to a more comfy one and rode it on their property a little bit before the mosquitoes started attacking lol Those things seem to love me.

Null66 06-11-14 10:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WestMichiganGuy (Post 16841815)
Yeah, not much of a chance as I got it yesterday and it started raining last night and is on and off raining today but I got about a half mile on it between a few laps around the block here and then went to in laws and changed the saddle to a more comfy one and rode it on their property a little bit before the mosquitoes started attacking lol Those things seem to love me.


EXCELLENT!

That's SO cool!

Do you like the new saddle?

<edit> I feel the same about weight. My DT is 35.5 with kickstand, rack, and fatties. Pack is heavy as there's spares and tools...

WestMichiganGuy 06-11-14 10:51 AM

Yeah, the new saddle is MUCH better. The original was like "sitting on a brick" (that is actually a quote from one of the reviews for that bike from someone much lighter than me but summed it up perfect)

Cannot wait for the weather to pass so I can start some small riding and letting the fun begin

Johnny Mullet 06-11-14 10:54 AM

A heavy bike is actually ideal for someone wanting to shed a few pounds.

Wanderer 06-11-14 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MRT2 (Post 16840176)
it might. OP outweighs me by 100 lbs, and I wouldn't ride on those stock wheels.

Just maybe, it sounds like you are an insensitive bike snob, because that's exactly what it sounds like, in every post you stuck in this thread, and many others.

Just chill out for awhile, and try to be positive.......... MHO


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:43 AM.