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Mindcrime 06-12-14 03:57 PM

Lurker coming out of the shadows -New(ish) clyde looking for tips for high heat rides
 
Hey there everyone.

I've been reading these forums for a few months, basically from the point I decided to give cycling a shot back in about march. I rode BMX and then MTB when I was a kid, up through college. Graduated, moved, bike stolen in the first year out of college, and I never went back. Flash forward 15 years, 75 lbs, and god knows how many decks of smokes and I decided it was time to get real or get the diabeetus.

So, I resolved to give up smoking, and try and loose some weight. Now, I've tried this before, mind you, and failed every time. This time though has been different. I quit smoking on my birthday exactly two months ago. Haven't had one since. Longest I've been quit since I started when I was 19. Its going well on that front.

I resolved to work out. I have had success with that in the past, but the problem has always been sticking to anything longer than about 2-3 months out of boredom. I really, really detest working out for the sake of working out. There are so many interesting things I could be doing instead.

Then I hit on biking. I used to do that just because it was fun, right? Why not try and see if the spark was still there? I cleared it with the wife, developed a budget based on savings from smoking (a little paid forward) and researched bikes. I settled on a hybrid due to my prior experiences with BMX and MTB, paired with the knowledge that most of my rides would be on the road given the geography of my immediate vicinity.

I pulled the trigger and bought a new Cannondale Quick CX 5. Not looking for advise or criticism on the bike. I love it. Flat out love it. Have added some Shimano single sided SPD pedals (no shoes yet, but soon, using the platforms for now), ergo bar ends, and a couple cages for water bottles.

Started not being able to go 5 miles in early May. Last weekend I did 15 miles Saturday and 12 Sunday, and Im going to do 17 and 14 this weekend. The spark was definitely still there. My bike is in for its first tuneup these past few days, and I've been missing getting in the wind quite a bit.

I am long term training to ride the MS 150 next April. I need to use the summer to drop some weight, get fit, and get fast(er.)

In the fall at some point, I'm going to buy a road bike, and then push the training more seriously in the cooler months here in Houston leading up to the 150.

After that long introduction story, here's my problem.

In the last few weeks, summer started here in Houston. I ride early, usually starting by 6:30 on weekdays and by 8 on the weekend. Weekdays, no problem, im in and off the bike by 7:30 (gotta go to work, just dropping in 8-10 miles usually) but the weekends, I might be out to nearly 10 right now, and that's only going to get later as the miles get longer on the weekends.

But... its ****ING HOT in Houston after 9 or so. And I'm fat. And pouring sweat. Both bottles are gone or nearly gone by the end of a 15 mile ride with nowhere to fill up.

Any suggestions how to keep cooler, or how to carry more water on the frame? (I do not want a camelback.)

PhotoJoe 06-12-14 04:20 PM

Welcome to the forum. Glad you chimed in.

Congrats on getting serious. I get the feeling that the MS150 will be no problem for you if you keep it up!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mindcrime (Post 16846249)
I pulled the trigger and bought a new Cannondale Quick CX 5. Not looking for advise or criticism on the bike. I love it. Flat out love it. Have added some Shimano single sided SPD pedals (no shoes yet, but soon, using the platforms for now), ergo bar ends, and a couple cages for water bottles.

Excellent choice in bikes. My wife rides one, and LOVES it.

As far as sweating and being hot - sweat is really good for you. Embrace it. Feed it. I sweat like a pig. There is a group of us SoCal C/A riders that get together once in a while and go climb a mountain. People say you need two bottles to get to the top. NOPE. Not me. I need 4, guaranteed. It is what it is. My recommendation is that you stay hydrated, 24/7. Not just when you go ride. Dump the sodas (if you haven't - I struggle with that) and drink lots of water. If you start a ride well-hydrated, you're off to a good start. If you don't, it's hard to catch up. For longer rides, think about adding electrolytes. I'm not an expert there, but someone will chime in.

As far as carrying more water, I agree, I hate wearing anything on my back. I used to carry two bottles on the frame and two on the seat post, but I gave the seatpost setup to my wife because her frame only takes one bottle. I now carry the other two bottles in jersey pockets with good results.

Here are some options: https://www.google.com/search?q=seat...a&channel=fflb
@Beachgrad05 has one that liked to launch her bottles. That's what we call "bad". She now ties them down and I haven't heard of any problems since.

Happy riding.

eja_ bottecchia 06-12-14 04:22 PM

Welcome!

Beachgrad05 06-12-14 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhotoJoe (Post 16846302)
Here are some options: https://www.google.com/search?q=seat...a&channel=fflb
@Beachgrad05 has one that liked to launch her bottles. That's what we call "bad". She now ties them down and I haven't heard of any problems since.

I have the aqua rack by performance designs. I mostly have used shoelaces to hold bottles in on GMR as losing a bottle with folks screaming down the mountain behind you is not a good idea...I'd hate to be responsible for someone's death or horrific injury.

That being said...I have found that if I hit serious bumps and the bottle is empty...it is more likely to come lose and fall out. That happened on the PS century this past Feb. We were getting to the "lunch" stop and the road leading to it was beyond rough. ROUBAIX like IMHO was what it was. I rattled so hard one of my bottles came out. Had to stop and pick it up. :notamused:


Oh...and WELCOME TO THE FORUMS!!!
:welcome

Ursa Minor 06-12-14 04:32 PM

Sweet! I'm so happy for you. It took me 5 tries to quit smoking. And I agree that riding the bike is just plain fun.

Charlie

Granturismonut 06-12-14 04:38 PM

I opt for the Camelbak approach. I can carry plenty of water and extras.

raqball 06-12-14 04:50 PM

I use a Profile Designs Aquarack and it works great!

The bottles fit nice and tight and I've never had a bottle launch out of it. As a matter of fact, I sometimes wish the bottles fit a bit more loosely into it..

At any rate, it attaches to your seat post and it will hold 2 extra bottles of water and it works great!

Profile Design - Aquarack

Beachgrad05 06-12-14 05:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by raqball (Post 16846386)
I use a Profile Designs Aquarack and it works great!

The bottles fit nice and tight and I've never had a bottle launch out of it. As a matter of fact, I sometimes wish the bottles fit a bit more loosely into it..

Profile Design - Aquarack


I use Camelbak Podium Big Chill bottles and they fit snugly but if I hit a serious bump and they happen to be empty...I have had a bottle launch twice now. I take no chances if it can cause a danger to another rider. That being said, I don't use the shoelace tie down trick on normal rides, only GMR where the downhill is treacherous enough w/o adding to it unnecessarily. I love my aqua rack. Have a camelbak too but HATE wearing the weight of the extra water on my back. Tho I'm not to proud to use it if needed. Am doing the 4th of July ride up GMR and might bring that along along with my four bottles on the bike because there is NO water between the base and Mt. Baldy Village...and the road will be closed so no way to have a SAG vehicle with extra..nor would I be able to drive a small disposable cooler up to stash with water.

Black wallnut 06-12-14 05:12 PM

Welcome. FWIW I once had heat stroke due to dehydration. You do not want to go there. The good news is by staying hydrated I can ride in heat with no problems. For me that is in excess of a big bottle an hour in the heat. I stay hydrated when I'm off the bike to the point that my urine is mostly clear and once an hour when I'm awake. If you are sweating lots of salt out be sure to replace it.

Beachgrad05 06-12-14 05:27 PM

Yes to the replace sodium lost. Drink an electrolyte enhanced beverage if rides make you sweat enough. I have had hyponatremia (low sodium) and you can die from it. I was in the hospital for 3 days getting it back to normal because apparently, once you are to this point, getting the sodum levels back to normal is also dangerous to your brain and so it has to be done slowly. In fact, I was on a NO SODIUM diet while in hospital because they wanted to monitor exactly how much sodium I was getting as they increased my levels.

The only thing I might say is Gatorade and the like are good in a pinch but are really sweet and IMO sugary. Maybe try NUUN for shorter rides but where you sweat alot. NUUN works well for me. YMMV

WestPablo 06-12-14 05:51 PM

Without a rack with panniers, I'm afraid that your water storage is limited to the bottle cages on your bike, unless you buy a Camelbak.

Of course, one possible solution would be to freeze all of your water overnight and place them on your bike, just before you take off. However, that would mean that you'd have to fill up to capacity, just before leaving and search for water on the way to your destination. Then once you've arrived at your final destination, you can then start sipping from your own melted water, under the hot Houston sun.

Sometimes, it pays to stop and chill out at a McDonald's, Lowe's, Walmart, or someplace.

Well, at least that's what I do, anyways...

CommuteCommando 06-12-14 05:52 PM

Welcome. I got back on a bike around 2000. Got a KHS A-Lite 500. Caught a bus to the LBS to pick it up and ride it four miles home. That ride was a steady 3% grade. I almost didn't make it. Now I have done two centuries, and last weekend went on a solo ride of 60 miles with 3500 feet climbing. I am 50 something. you can do it.

I smoked my last cigarette 3/15/1988. The first week was the hardest. After a month it was determination. I felt safe from relapse after a year.

StephenH 06-12-14 06:36 PM

Get a 100 oz Camelbak. Fill it with ice, then water. Put ice and Gatorade in your bottles (the "insulated" bottle keep it cool a bit longer). That does me for 30 miles or so.

Try an ice sock. Get the biggest longest tube sock you can, fill it full of ice, tie the end shut, drape it around your neck. Feels good, water drips on your thighs, that feels good, lasts maybe 10 miles. I've used one two or three times, it's not a "normal" thing, more of an emergency measure.

Don't be afraid to stop in the shade if you need to. Carry money with you so you can buy cold drinks or ice or ice cream or popsicles if available.

Watch for churches that have outside faucets, and remember where they are.

I wear a headband under my helmet, helps keep the sweat out of my eyes. If your route has absolutely no supply points, consider changing routes just for that reason.

By the way, I grew up in Clute, down south of you there, and I'll just say, it ain't the heat, it's the humidity.

Zoxe 06-12-14 06:41 PM

Welcome and good luck! Keep posting here, and let us know how it's going.

WrightVanCleve 06-12-14 06:49 PM

I understand you don't want stuff on your back but I would learn to deal with it. Dehydration sucks. Severe dehydration is worse. You would be better off if you can carry all that extra water than get dehydrated. The more you carry, the more you'll drink, and the better you'll feel on those blistering rides.

Camelback used to make a waist pack, only held 60 oz of water but it was all centered on your waist like a fanny pack. If you don't mind something like that then you could search out for one of them. I don't think they make the model anymore that I used. I liked the one I had but the bladder was really hard to get ice in there because the opening was small unlike openings they have today(it was 10 to 15 years ago.) Bag was also special so if you did have a problem with the bladder, you had to special order where most backpack types are interchangeable. I liked it because it was off my back and I wanted the stuff off my back to get under low branches when I ducked since I was on a mountain bike, but I also hated the drawbacks and ended up getting a backpack type and learned to deal with it.

Water bottles can be frozen over night, but even insulated bottles will have your drink warm after an hour or two(depending upon the heat) or not quite thawed if you need the drink sooner. They also don't always hold enough water so be careful you check on how much they hold. You can stop and get a beverage, but then you are spending money unless you can plan a route that hits parks with drinking fountains, but then you will be limited to where you can go and can't really explore. Even having to stop you'll probably want to plan the routes more so that you can make sure you have a place to buy something. Not sure how your country side is, mine isn't too bad if I want to stop but not every small town has a Kwik-E-Mart type of store or a place you can buy something cold. I like to be able to get out and ride and sometimes explore and not worry about such things.

You do much better if you can carry enough water and are prepared. Dehydration sucks. Can't say that enough. Been there, done that, don't care to go back.

Null66 06-12-14 07:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Granturismonut (Post 16846349)
I opt for the Camelbak approach. I can carry plenty of water and extras.

+ 2!

bbeasley 06-12-14 08:55 PM

Hey, congratulations on you efforts and plan. I think you'll be fine on the MS 150, way to go on starting early.

I live over in Hammond, La about the same heat/humidity profile as Houston. Two medium water bottles last me 40 miles but I've been doing this for 4 years so you'll go through more as you build fitness. One thing I do is drink a couple of bottles pre ride and have plenty ready post ride. A half full bottle at the end does you no good, I empty my last bottle with 7 - 10 to go (about 30 min of ride time).

A lot of this depends on how long it takes you to do the 15. My 40 is in a group, so lots of drafting, and it takes about 2.5 hours to do it.

Another way to look at it is I pre hydrate and don't worry about the first 10. Then I come in on empty, having emptied my last bottle with 7 to go. 40 - 17 = 23. My 23 - your 15 is just 8 miles, I'd chock that up to 4 years of fitness. I think your doing great! Perhaps a bit more pre ride hydration and post ride supply will help?

Whatever you do, test it conservatively until you know your body. Not much worse than heat stroke. It used to freak me out to ride those last few miles without water, regardless of the number of houses/business's I passed with water faucets :)

Enjoy your ride!

Mindcrime 06-13-14 07:35 AM

Thanks for all the replies! I like the seat post mounted two bottle holder. I hadn't run across that piece of gear before. Think I'll get me one of those. I'll also start pre-hydrating, I hadn't really thought of that beyond my usual fluid intake when I'm not on the bike (plus a big glass of water after the ride!)

It takes me about 75-80 minutes or so to do the 15 at this point, when I stay completely on the road. Maybe 90-100 if I go on the trails, can't go as fast. My bottles are not insulated, I didn't see any at my LBS (though I admit I did not spend long browsing the bottles before I bought the two I have on my bike currently.) I'm headed by the LBS tonight to pick up my bike from it's tuneup, and will investigate insulated bottles immediately!

Thanks for all the encouragement! Great forum.

spdracr39 06-13-14 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PhotoJoe (Post 16846302)
Welcome to the forum. Glad you chimed in.

As far as sweating and being hot - sweat is really good for you. Embrace it. Feed it. I sweat like a pig. There is a group of us SoCal C/A riders that get together once in a while and go climb a mountain. People say you need two bottles to get to the top. NOPE. Not me. I need 4, guaranteed. It is what it is. My recommendation is that you stay hydrated, 24/7. Not just when you go ride. Dump the sodas (if you haven't - I struggle with that) and drink lots of water. If you start a ride well-hydrated, you're off to a good start. If you don't, it's hard to catch up. For longer rides, think about adding electrolytes. I'm not an expert there, but someone will chime in.

As far as carrying more water, I agree, I hate wearing anything on my back. I used to carry two bottles on the frame and two on the seat post, but I gave the seatpost setup to my wife because her frame only takes one bottle. I now carry the other two bottles in jersey pockets with good results.

Here are some options: https://www.google.com/search?q=seat...a&channel=fflb
@Beachgrad05 has one that liked to launch her bottles. That's what we call "bad". She now ties them down and I haven't heard of any problems since.

Happy riding.

Great Advice. Hydrate before the ride and as far as the sweating be sure to wear the proper attire. I never saw the reason for investing 100.00 in a bike jersey because I thought they were just to look cool. They are awesome and well worth the money. The moisture wicking keeps you much cooler and keeps you from feeling drenched in sweat. You also get extra storage for added water, energy packs, or food and its down low where you don't even know its there. Next purchase is a bike helmet that's properly vented to keep your head cool stay away from dark colors. The sweat band for your head is a must for keeping the sweat out of your eyes. I use one of those with the cooling beads in it and it works great. Good Luck and Keep On Riding !!!

TrojanHorse 06-13-14 11:34 AM

Proper attire is key, I agree with @spdracr39.

Big fellas tend to want to wear baggy shirts to disguise their bigness but avoid that tendency on your bike. You want the jersey to be form fitting without being too tight - it helps evaporation. Also, putting stuff in your jersey pockets will pull the jersey down on your back unless the shirt fits correctly.

You can get collapsible water bottles for your jersey pocket if you don't want to deal with sticking a huge bottle in there - here's one option - Amazon.com : Platypus SoftBottle with Push-Pull Cap : Snowshoes : Sports & Outdoors

The camelback podium big chill is my favorite water bottle - it does a decent job at keeping liquids cold. Amazon.com : Camelbak Podium Big Chill 25 oz Bottle, Clear/Carbon : Sports Water Bottles : Sports & Outdoors

I definitely investigate water refill spots on any prospective routes I'm planning - there's always something somewhere unless you're out in the desert. I know from experience that I'll go through about a bottle an hour if it's hot and I'm in good shape - if it gets really hot or I'm in worse shape, that number goes up and I need to plan accordingly. I do have a faux camelbak I'll use when I'm concerned about water being a problem because I suffer when I run out of water. I think it's partly mental, the suffering starts the split second I drink that last drop of water, which makes no sense. :)

Make sure you drink lots of water every day, it'll help.

Good luck out there!


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