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  1. #26
    Senior Member Pakiwi's Avatar
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    I also believe the fat you eat is the fat you wear. My diet has changed with the riding as well as water intake. Part of it was related to realizing heck I'm eating an hours ride of energy in 5 mins. Also I felt hunger for different foods now. Bananas are my friend now.
    Allan

  2. #27
    Senior Member IBOHUNT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbeasley View Post
    Rik,
    You're in the 90 + min/day range. I know you've dropped serious weight in the last year, does that article ring true for you?
    I wouldn't call myself lean. I've had a couple of setbacks (killed a truck a yr ago then surgery in Feb) where I gained some weight back but easily shed to where I was a year ago. I could stand to lose 20 lbs but I'm not working at it right now. Maybe when I start training for the MCM

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pakiwi View Post
    I also believe the fat you eat is the fat you wear.
    The sugar you eat is the fat you wear, at least for me...

  4. #29
    Uber Goober StephenH's Avatar
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    I've been averaging over a 1,000 miles a month for the last 18 months or more, and have managed to gain and to lose weight in that time.

    It was rather enlightening to me to see one of our best riders finish a 200k, being a very trim and fit person, and then sit down and order a salad. So he's Mr Buff but still having to watch what he eats to maintain that.
    "be careful this rando stuff is addictive and dan's the 'pusher'."

  5. #30
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    It is important in our weight-centric culture to remember that weight is only one measure of health. A bad diet affects may facets of health and fitness and you can be lean and still very unhealthy.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    The sugar you eat is the fat you wear, at least for me...
    Basic biochemistry... why can't we all figure this out?
    Silver Electra Townie 21D // My Profiles: Strava // MapMyRide // MyFitnessPal


    Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Calorie Counter

  7. #32
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    A few years ago I was weighing about 260lbs and I started working out (no cycling just strength training and running for cardio). I worked down to 200 lbs at one point. I noticed the more I worked out the better my diet became. I figured I'm not going to go out and kill myself every night and then go home and undo what I did in the gym or on the track. It even got to a point where I would volunteer to be DD(back when i was single and lived for the weekend.) on the weekends because I didn't want to add the extra calories especially that late at night. When I saw progress it was easy to stay the course but the closer I got to my goal the harder it was. I know everybody is different but I know i couldn't do 90 minutes of exercise while running on double bacon cheese burgers they zap all my energy and motivation and I just want to lay around.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by lsberrios1 View Post
    I have balanced out at 7-8 hours of cycling a week and my weight stays fairly healthy (165-168 @ 8% BF).
    Appropriate thread to post this pic I found yesterday!
    Before Year 2012: 216lbs
    After Year 2014: 167lbs

    Holy crap, I want to be that guy. Going from "Look, I'm pedaling!" to "Hey ladies, I'm racing." Seriously, you can really see it in your face structure. Getting my body fat down is a major concern as I get closer to 60. I won't be pear shaped, let alone fat like I see most guys my age. But to put 1 1/2 hr a day or more is really hard to discipline myself to do.
    "Of course you eat too much" (Looigi) There are things people say that are so true you can never forget the wisdom. I still eat too much. Without denial.
    Awarded 2014 Billy Madison "Ultimate Insult" by jsharr. Must have been something about my rambling, incoherent response...

  9. #34
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbeasley View Post
    I agree, so we're left with the calorie and exercise balancing act. I was hoping to see more on how much we exercise and not have this turn into yet another diet football. I know of a couple of forum members that I believe fit into the numbers in the article...
    Late to this party, but here's my experience.

    When I was training for racing I was on the bike, some of it at very high intensities, for about 10 - 12 hours per week. I lost no weight during the racing season because if I tried to cut down on the calories I couldn't manage the intensity and became uncompetitive. So my consumption went up to match my activity. And my diet was largely healthy - little refined sugar, high fruit and veg consumption, plenty of protein, so there weren't many "empty calories" in there.

    During the winter, my training volume would go up and the level of intensity went down. I could lose weight then, because although my calorie output was similar (more time on bike, but easier miles) I didn't need to fuel up for the all-out efforts. And this matches my experience when touring. I've done some long tours, the longest about 2500 miles over two months on a loaded expedition touring bike: me, the bike and my baggage probably weighed around 275 lbs. typically I'd be riding about 60 miles per day, five days per week, at a modest 12 mph average. So that's about 25 hours per week on the bike. On that trip I lost weight reasonably steadily - about 2lbs per week - while eating and drinking whatever I wanted. But even then, Krispy Kremes and sodas were never on the menu, just because they aren't the sort of stuff I eat. Plenty of burgers and pizzas, though...
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  10. #35
    Cat 5 field stuffer bbeasley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    During the winter, my training volume would go up and the level of intensity went down. I could lose weight then, because although my calorie output was similar (more time on bike, but easier miles) I didn't need to fuel up for the all-out efforts.
    This makes sense to me. It's almost like one has to gently exercise to lose weight while exercising. I wish I had a "gently" setting in my personality.

  11. #36
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbeasley View Post
    This makes sense to me. It's almost like one has to gently exercise to lose weight while exercising. I wish I had a "gently" setting in my personality.
    I have a theory about this which seems to accord with the science as I understand it, but may be hokum...

    When doing really intense exercise one depletes one's glycogen stores. The more intense the effort, the more glycogen one burns. At maximum effort one is burning almost 100% glycogen and no fat, whereas at moderate "cruising" speeds most of one's energy comes from fat stores. So after an intense workout one is much more driven to replace the calories burned - the glycogen stores have to be replaced. But after a moderate session this effect is much less marked, because the glycogen stores aren't exhausted and there is no imperative to replace the fat you've burned.

    So my theory is, if you spend two hours on the bike at 400kcal per hour, instead of one hour at 800kcal, you'll have burned the same number of calories but you will find it easier to manage your appetite at the end. And that has been my experience. Extensive, as opposed to intensive, exercise is more compatible with my managing my calorie intake, because I don't get as ravenous.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    When doing really intense exercise one depletes one's glycogen stores. The more intense the effort, the more glycogen one burns. At maximum effort one is burning almost 100% glycogen and no fat, whereas at moderate "cruising" speeds most of one's energy comes from fat stores. So after an intense workout one is much more driven to replace the calories burned - the glycogen stores have to be replaced. But after a moderate session this effect is much less marked, because the glycogen stores aren't exhausted and there is no imperative to replace the fat you've burned.
    My understanding is that you don't start burning appreciable amounts of fat until you've nearly exhausted your glycogen stores. At moderate "cruising" speeds, your body may be more efficient about converting fat to energy, but that doesn't mean that the amount of fat burned will be large. My personal experience is that during the work week my hour-long lunch rides don't seem to change the amount of fat I carry. Doing long (2+ hour), intense rides on the weekends is the thing that really seems to trigger fat loss for me. This strategy works even better if I try to avoid eating carbs for a couple of hours after a long ride. A cup of low-fat cottage cheese is the perfect recovery food for me: not much fat, not many carbs, but lots of protein.

    So my theory is, if you spend two hours on the bike at 400kcal per hour, instead of one hour at 800kcal, you'll have burned the same number of calories but you will find it easier to manage your appetite at the end.
    I find the opposite to be true: I feel less hungry after an intense 2+-hour ride than an intense 1-hour ride. Dunno if it's the fact that I have more things to worry about after a long, intense ride (ex: being able to stand) or because my body has started to burn fat and realizes that it has access to an ample supply of energy

  13. #38
    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    My understanding is that you don't start burning appreciable amounts of fat until you've nearly exhausted your glycogen stores. At moderate "cruising" speeds, your body may be more efficient about converting fat to energy, but that doesn't mean that the amount of fat burned will be large.
    No, you are mistaken about that. You'll always burn some glycogen, because without it your muscles won't fire, but at low levels of activity you'll draw most of your fuel directly from fat stores. That doesn't mean you'll burn huge amounts of fat - at 9kcal per gram, even five hours on the bike at cruising speed will probably shift only about a half-pound of fat - but it is still mostly fat.

    There's a chart showing the balance of glycogen vs fat burned at different intensities. I can't lay my hands on it now, but google will find it for you.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    No, you are mistaken about that. You'll always burn some glycogen, because without it your muscles won't fire, but at low levels of activity you'll draw most of your fuel directly from fat stores. That doesn't mean you'll burn huge amounts of fat - at 9kcal per gram, even five hours on the bike at cruising speed will probably shift only about a half-pound of fat - but it is still mostly fat.
    If you can burn a half-pound of fat by exercising for five hours at cruising speed, more power to you! I've found that when I keep my heart-rate in the "fat burning zone" for an hour or two that I don't burn any fat. Or lose any weight. Luckily, my mistaken view seems to work well for me: I lost 50lbs (220 -> 170) six years ago and aside from a slight gain during the winter off-season I've kept the weight off...

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    If you can burn a half-pound of fat by exercising for five hours at cruising speed, more power to you! I've found that when I keep my heart-rate in the "fat burning zone" for an hour or two that I don't burn any fat. Or lose any weight. Luckily, my mistaken view seems to work well for me: I lost 50lbs (220 -> 170) six years ago and aside from a slight gain during the winter off-season I've kept the weight off...
    It works for me. I'm still getting back in shape after a year slacking off growing from 185 pounds back to Clydestale size so I don't yet have the capacity for more than one hard day a week; although I have no problem filling in the rest of 8-14 hours riding at an endurance or recovery pace which doesn't make me hungry and at 8 hours a week is good for most of a pound (172 pounds and shrinking down from 200 at the beginning of the year).
    last_week.jpg

    short_week.jpg
    When I was last in decent shape I rode a lot harder, was hungrier, ate to compensate, and didn't loose much even when expending more energy in less time

    2011_week.jpg

    The other side of this is what qualifies as an endurance pace for you. After enough weeks riding 3x10 minute threshold intervals I'm good for 25% more one-hour power which should let me burn 25% more calories at a non-hunger causing endurance pace.
    Last edited by Drew Eckhardt; 06-26-14 at 01:36 PM.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by WrightVanCleve View Post
    Try a diet that includes a Wendy's Double Baconator with extra cheese, large fry, large coke, every day. You'll also need to include in the weekly diet fired chicken, plenty of Little Debbie snack cakes, more sugary stuff, more fired foods, other fast foods, a stop at Golden Corral or your local buffet equivalent at least once a week with several full plates every visit, and very little fruit or vegetables with mostly soda pop to drink with little water.

    While this may seem extreme when you read it, it isn't uncommon for some of us to have such a diet. This is over a weekly period. I would not be surprised if quite a few of us had a similar diet if you write what you eat for a week, and normally, not what you are eating because you are paying attention.

    I had a diet similar to above, minus the soda. I don't like soda that much and my back hurts from all the acid if I didn't drink water and I just prefer water anyway. The rest is pretty accurate to what I would eat, some variation in stuff but it is a pretty good representation of what I would consume over a week.

    You're not going to out ride this diet. I can guarantee it.
    I'm a huge fan of the Wendy's Baconator.

    I've found that when eating "empty" calories, I just don't perform well on any level. Aside from having an upset stomach and everything that goes with it, I find myself feeling pretty lethargic; just not having much energy at all. I don't drink too much soda, but I'll throw down an occasional Pepsi.

    I've been working on slowly changing my diet over the past week and a half, and just eating more fruits, salads, grilled chicken, etc. and I've felt a bit more energetic. I've also tossed "garbage snacks" like (baked) Cheetos and (baked) Doritos to the side, replacing them with apples, pears, grapes, and other fruits. I've found I don't really miss the "garbage snacks" at all, and that fruits taste far more rewarding to me.

    I won't say I've totally done away with my poor eating habits, but I've made a conscious effort to try to improve my eating habits.
    - Dan \m/

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