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Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg) Looking to lose that spare tire? Ideal weight 200+? Frustrated being a large cyclist in a sport geared for the ultra-light? Learn about the bikes and parts that can take the abuse of a heavier cyclist, how to keep your body going while losing the weight, and get support from others who've been successful.

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Old 06-29-14, 05:25 PM   #1
xXXFR8TRNXXx
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Looking for some input.

Three years ago I purchased a rigid frame mountain bike to lose weight, the cruiser bikes I have were not cutting it. I'm now riding between 50 to 70 miles a week and want to increase the milage. When I started this little adventure, my weight was close to 270, now I'm down to 244 at 5'10".

Anyway, I ride mostly on paved road, some dirt roads, and have been thinking about getting a road bike. After doing some research, I have narrowed it down to a cyclocross type bike. Here are the three I'm looking at, all steel frame. The first is the, GT Corsa Disc Brake Road Bike. This one just looks heavy duty, but I can't find any reviews on it, only media hype. The second, the Raleigh Roper. Good looking bike, but the rear stays don't look like they will stand the test of time, that's just my uneducated opinion. The third, is the Surly Cross Check. Like I said all of these are steal framed, that is why I chose them.

So I'm looking for input on these choices from people that have more experience and knowledge then I. Not looking to race or compete, just ride longer and farther.
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Old 06-29-14, 07:15 PM   #2
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At 244 lbs., you can ride any of those bikes and even most true road bikes. I'm now about 210-215, but have ridden Trek carbon bikes for years, even when I was 230, with no problems. The only reason to look at a cyclocross over a road bike for me is I ride my cyclocross on unpaved rail-to-trails and on errands around town. (Of all the bikes I've owned, I like my Trek Domane the best. It's a real comfortable ride.)
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Old 06-29-14, 07:22 PM   #3
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I wouldn't discard road bikes at your weight. I really don't know XC so I can't comment on that, but you should try both. You may be impressed with the sheer speed of a 23mm wide tire . Look a Trek Domane and Specialized Roubaix.
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Old 06-29-14, 08:17 PM   #4
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If you want one to just ride around, agree don't rule out regular road bikes. However, if you want a cross, then take a look at the DiamondBack Steilacoom RCX, I read some good things about it. I recently bought a Trek CrossRip Comp, but they are seriously low on stock and I got lucky that they happened to have 2 in my size across the nation. I use mine for commuting, but if they have one in your size, it's worth a look as well. Also the Cannondale CAADX is a stellar machine..again, it was a low in stock on my size, so I went with the Trek.
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Old 06-29-14, 08:29 PM   #5
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+1 to considering regular road bikes.

I weigh about 225 right now, and was at 230 a month ago. My road bike does just fine. They are much sturdier than most of us think. Aluminum bikes add a margin of safety, I believe, over carbon-fiber.

When in doubt, Craigslist it out. Get a good, used road bike for $300. They are out there. Many were $800 a few years ago, and never really used. See if you like a real road bike. If not, sell it for what you paid.
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Old 06-29-14, 08:32 PM   #6
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You can also look at the Jamis Bosanova or Bianchi Volpe. I believe both are steel framed as well. Jamis tends to give you a lot of bike for the money and when I rode the Aurora it was a very comfortable ride.
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Old 06-29-14, 08:50 PM   #7
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You may be impressed with the sheer speed of a 23mm wide tire . Look a Trek Domane and Specialized Roubaix.
I suspect the OP will not be impressed with the way a 23mm wide tire performs on dirt roads. If he's willing to go pavement only, then a road bike might make sense. If he wants to continue to ride off-road, then a cyclocross bike is the ideal mount...

To the OP: I don't think frame material matters as much once you're running high-volume (32+mm) tires. Personally, I've never understood the attraction of heavy, flexy steel frames. You might consider test-riding an aluminum CX bike like the Trek CrossRip or Specialized TriCross. My touring bike uses an aluminum frame and I'm always amazed at how well it rides given how much I hate aluminum frames on skinny-tired road bikes.

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Old 06-29-14, 08:50 PM   #8
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Oh I forgot to mention, I've been riding regular road bikes when I was well over 300 lbs so at 240, you should not have any issues with the frame, just watch the spoke count. I would not go below 28 on the back.
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Old 06-29-14, 11:17 PM   #9
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Hard to beat something like a Giant Escape for a hybrid-road bike.

I put 700x38 tires (think it came with 700x32) on it and often refer to it as my "S.U.V" bike . . . It will easily tackle most any road conditions that a suburban ride might encounter - Including the occasional stretch of a dirt road.

With a #300 load on top it does me well . . . As does my Specialized Secteur (but I try to keep this one only on pavement.)
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Old 06-30-14, 05:27 AM   #10
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It will easily tackle most any road conditions that a suburban ride might encounter - Including the occasional stretch of a dirt road.
FWIW, I ride almost exclusively dirt roads on my Escape with the stock 32's. Rollercoaster hills so I don't much like going down the hills and am coasting on the brakes pretty much for all the downhill, but I get her up to 18-20 mph sometimes on the dirt. I just have to watch the tree shadows that hide holes in the road when descending at that speed as a lot of my riding is in the middle of nowhere in the woods.

Example of 90% of the road riding I do:

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Old 06-30-14, 11:25 AM   #11
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The newer CX bikes make great road and fire road bikes--disk brakes, with the ability to mount fat, hi volume tires or skinny road burners. ..

And at 240, you have nothing to worry about from any of your choices. .
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Old 06-30-14, 11:49 AM   #12
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Personally, I've never understood the attraction of heavy, flexy steel frames. You might consider test-riding an aluminum CX bike like the Trek CrossRip or Specialized TriCross. My touring bike uses an aluminum frame and I'm always amazed at how well it rides given how much I hate aluminum frames on skinny-tired road bikes.
+1 ... Both my CX bike and my roadie are AL bikes. And I love them both.
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Old 06-30-14, 08:16 PM   #13
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Thank you for the replies. I sorta thought the steel frames would be better for my weight. Good to know thats not the case.
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Old 06-30-14, 08:27 PM   #14
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That's why I was thinking CX bike. My plans are rail trails and my normal fitness riding. Plus the Mojave sun does wonders on the asphalt out here.
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Old 06-30-14, 08:43 PM   #15
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Hard to beat something like a Giant Escape for a hybrid-road bike.
You could also take a look at the Giant Roam 2, I've got one and love it. It's got slightly wider tires yet than the Escape at 40mm. I also love the hydraulic disc brakes as well, especially when sailing down a long descent. The only thing I could not stand was the saddle, just needed something a bit wider and sprung so i took the saddle of my original Giant Sedona.
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Old 07-01-14, 01:14 AM   #16
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The bike I bought 3 years ago is a Giant Talon 1, and I'm running Big Apples on it. Mainly because I was wearing the knobs off the Kendas that came on it. It's not a bad bike, it's just HEAVY.
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Old 07-01-14, 10:00 AM   #17
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And by the way, as you've read, it almost doesn't matter what frame material you pick--carbon, in particular, has a reputation opposite of that with which it started: it is at least as long lived, and arguably stronger, than any of the other frame materials...
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Old 07-01-14, 11:00 AM   #18
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you'll be fine on carbon frame as well but anyhow, get disc brakes. most of the stress is on the wheelset and tires. Good thing about CX bikes, it's an easy tire swap to 23/25c tires (pending rim design) for road usage. I hate swapping tires so I run schwalbe sammy slicks, or kenda happy mediums would be the tubeless version and down to 32c.
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Old 07-01-14, 11:22 AM   #19
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I suspect the OP will not be impressed with the way a 23mm wide tire performs on dirt roads.
There are no problems on dirt roads, I am running 23x700 armadillo all condition. The problem comes when there is very loose dirt or crushed rock(cutting tires). The only regret buying my road bike is that it can only handle 25x700 or smaller tires.
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Old 07-01-14, 01:09 PM   #20
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Hardshell gator skins will help with the cuts (25-32c) or run tubeless and try avoid cutting the sidewall in the deeper rock areas.
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Old 07-01-14, 05:05 PM   #21
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Hardshell gator skins will help with the cuts (25-32c) or run tubeless and try avoid cutting the sidewall in the deeper rock areas.
Hopefully the hardshell are better than the regular gatorskin- I cut my sidewalls going through a rut on the road after 300 miles [MENTION=16318]110psi[/MENTION]. I have tubeless rims, I may mount tubeless tires to them next time.
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Old 07-01-14, 06:01 PM   #22
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Personally, I air down when I hit the dirt for a healthy portion of time then C02 back up when I hit the paved again. My super6 had Stan's A400's tubeless I'd run down to 90f/95r for paved and drop 4-5psi for hard dirt (25c spesh roubaix tires) and I would run 25c hardshells at the near same PSI with some testing. You can fit 28c hardshells on the rear of the super but no way in the fronts.
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Old 01-11-15, 12:17 AM   #23
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So I ended up getting a 2014 Trek CrossRip LTD today. Tomorrow is my 50th, so it was a present to myself. I'm pretty excited about it, but the weather is sort of crappy for riding.
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Old 01-11-15, 01:11 AM   #24
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So I ended up getting a 2014 Trek CrossRip LTD today. Tomorrow is my 50th, so it was a present to myself. I'm pretty excited about it, but the weather is sort of crappy for riding.
C'mon! You have a cross bike, the weather today was perfect. Heck, I got rained on today on my dainty road bike, surely you won't melt.

The key, of course, is the proper clothing. It was 50 deg and a little rainy in my area, so a base layer, long fingered gloves and toe covers did the trick.
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Old 01-11-15, 01:47 AM   #25
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So I ended up getting a 2014 Trek CrossRip LTD today. Tomorrow is my 50th, so it was a present to myself. I'm pretty excited about it, but the weather is sort of crappy for riding.
Congrats.

It sounds like a nice bike.
One of the advantages of the CX bike over the Road bike is that with a little more tire clearance, it opens you up to a variety of tires from fat to skinny, whereas some people with road bikes end up with lots of problems cramming oversized tires onto their bikes.

32H is a good hub/rim choice.
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