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  1. #1
    The Left Coast, USA FrenchFit's Avatar
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    Clyde/Athena Ground Zero

    I've always thought that the rants & raves about obese Americans was a bit much; more about haters hatin' than any genuine societal concern. At least in my hometown, athletes abound. We invented healthy in California. And then today, I went to the County State Fair a mile away; OMG! I wish I could wipe some of the visuals from my mind; like those people in line at Funnel Cake windows. I was a little sick to my stomach.

    Folks, we do have a problem. Congrats to everyone here that seeks a healthier lifestyle...may you succeed & thrive.

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    Go to a Walmart in a southern state (and probably northern too but I don't know that) and you will see more lard than at a Crisco factory!

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    Travelling hopefully chasm54's Avatar
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    It isn't just America. When I started running hospitals in the 80's there were about 1m people in the UK with diabetes; just under 2% of the population. Now it's 3m, or 5%. By 2025 it's predicted to be 4m, or almost 7% - and some experts believe that's an underestimate. Almost all of that is attributable to increasing obesity.

    The most depressing part, for me, is how many parents have lost the ability to diagnose that their children are overweight. They think being fat is normal. As a result one-third of 10 year-olds in the UK are overweight or obese. Those kids have already established habits that are very hard to break and likely to shorten their lives.
    There have been many days when I haven't felt like riding, but there has never been a day when I was sorry I rode.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    It isn't just America. When I started running hospitals in the 80's there were about 1m people in the UK with diabetes; just under 2% of the population. Now it's 3m, or 5%. By 2025 it's predicted to be 4m, or almost 7% - and some experts believe that's an underestimate. Almost all of that is attributable to increasing obesity.

    The most depressing part, for me, is how many parents have lost the ability to diagnose that their children are overweight. They think being fat is normal. As a result one-third of 10 year-olds in the UK are overweight or obese. Those kids have already established habits that are very hard to break and likely to shorten their lives.
    We saw an entire family of five like that at our local shopping centre yesterday, and it's not uncommon here in Australia. In fact, IIRC, we have overtaken the US in terms of higher obesity numbers per head of population.

    People can point the finger at everything they want as an excuse for getting obese. But in reality, Western culture has moved ever so slowly to acceptance of obesity and regarding it as normal rather than abnormal. It is only when there is a major, life-threatening wake-up call that there is an effort to change lifestyles.

    Frankly, it has become natural selection. The parents are going to die younger, and then their kids. Then everyone will be saying "they need to do something". But it really means "I", and when that becomes accepted, some progress to healthier nations might occur.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

  5. #5
    Senior Member nkfrench's Avatar
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    My parents were raised during the Great Depression and had the mindset that healthy babies were well-fed and "pleasingly plump".
    My mom was convinced that a good mother should make sure that her children were well-nourished and not "skinny".

    So it isn't just a recent thing that parents don't see overweight/obesity in their kids.

    Most of my peers had younger parents born after the Depression and had a very different view of what a healthy person should look like. Thin was in.

    I was the 2nd fattest girl in my high school, 15 years old, 5'5" and 140#, class of 400 students.
    It was socially unacceptable and I dealt with all sorts of criticism throughout my school days - remarks that I was a big fat slob, classmates assuming I was stupid. There were other factors, but weight (being "different") certainly was a roadblock to making friendships.

    That would be a below-average height-weight for the high school I drive by these days. Shocking how many of the kids appear morbidly obese.
    A lot of the kids are gathering before school at the dairy store across the street where you can buy fast-food (breakfast sandwiches/burritos, hamburgers, fries, soft drinks and all sorts of ice cream treats).
    Whatever happened to feeding a decent breakfast to kids at home then letting them walk/ride a bike together to school?
    I do have to say that my parents would never feed us most of the products sold at a fast food restaurant.

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    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasm54 View Post
    It isn't just America. When I started running hospitals in the 80's there were about 1m people in the UK with diabetes; just under 2% of the population. Now it's 3m, or 5%. By 2025 it's predicted to be 4m, or almost 7% - and some experts believe that's an underestimate. Almost all of that is attributable to increasing obesity.

    The most depressing part, for me, is how many parents have lost the ability to diagnose that their children are overweight. They think being fat is normal. As a result one-third of 10 year-olds in the UK are overweight or obese. Those kids have already established habits that are very hard to break and likely to shorten their lives.
    It is true that it is becoming a global problem, but ground zero is truly the good ol' USA, with honorable mention to the UK. I say that because it was the British that gave us that wonderful invention the feedlot. It was responsible for making beef inexpensive enough to be mass marketed to kids by clowns. Humans are omnivores, and meat was traditionally expensive enough, both monetarily, and energy wise for those who had to either raise it, or hunt it down and kill it, that it was not the staple of our diet. Now we eat much more meat in proportion to vegetables than our ancestors, and this, and the fairly recent abundance of cheep sugar are among some of the causes of this.
    Last edited by CommuteCommando; 07-06-14 at 05:25 PM.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

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    Senior Member Cyril's Avatar
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    I tend my own garden.

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    Senior Member mrodgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nkfrench View Post
    That would be a below-average height-weight for the high school I drive by these days. Shocking how many of the kids appear morbidly obese.
    A lot of the kids are gathering before school at the dairy store across the street where you can buy fast-food (breakfast sandwiches/burritos, hamburgers, fries, soft drinks and all sorts of ice cream treats).
    Whatever happened to feeding a decent breakfast to kids at home then letting them walk/ride a bike together to school?
    I do have to say that my parents would never feed us most of the products sold at a fast food restaurant.
    A big difference today is, very few of the kids have mom home to feed them breakfast. At that age, most of the kids are waking up to an empty house because mom and dad are already at work and they have to fend for themselves. Is a teenager going to get up early enough to take the time to make themselves a healthy breakfast or go to the dairy store across the street, grab garbage food that probably tastes better to them, and socialize with all their friends?
    Ride no faster than your Guardian Angel can fly!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nkfrench View Post
    My parents were raised during the Great Depression and had the mindset that healthy babies were well-fed and "pleasingly plump".
    My mom was convinced that a good mother should make sure that her children were well-nourished and not "skinny".

    So it isn't just a recent thing that parents don't see overweight/obesity in their kids.

    Most of my peers had younger parents born after the Depression and had a very different view of what a healthy person should look like. Thin was in.

    I was the 2nd fattest girl in my high school, 15 years old, 5'5" and 140#, class of 400 students.
    It was socially unacceptable and I dealt with all sorts of criticism throughout my school days - remarks that I was a big fat slob, classmates assuming I was stupid. There were other factors, but weight (being "different") certainly was a roadblock to making friendships.

    That would be a below-average height-weight for the high school I drive by these days. Shocking how many of the kids appear morbidly obese.
    A lot of the kids are gathering before school at the dairy store across the street where you can buy fast-food (breakfast sandwiches/burritos, hamburgers, fries, soft drinks and all sorts of ice cream treats).
    Whatever happened to feeding a decent breakfast to kids at home then letting them walk/ride a bike together to school?
    I do have to say that my parents would never feed us most of the products sold at a fast food restaurant.
    It is illegal to walk or ride to school here... Even houses who's back yard abut the schools.

    It's deemed too dangerous, especially since speeding 2x over the speed limit is winked at.

    Just to make it more interesting they schedule less buses every year so bus rides get longer and longer. Reduces costs to school district, while externalizing costs to parents. Just like the school supply drives they have a couple times a year.


    Oh and "gym" is mostly walking around in circles in a parking lot as they don't want the school yard yard to get worn...

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrodgers View Post
    A big difference today is, very few of the kids have mom home to feed them breakfast. At that age, most of the kids are waking up to an empty house because mom and dad are already at work and they have to fend for themselves. Is a teenager going to get up early enough to take the time to make themselves a healthy breakfast or go to the dairy store across the street, grab garbage food that probably tastes better to them, and socialize with all their friends?
    That's interesting. Most of my friends and acquaintances not from the U.S. grew up with working mothers--their countries of origin do not have the obesity problem the U.S. has. There a lot more at play here than moms who work.

  11. #11
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    I recently got back from riding in Montana. One night I stayed in Butte and went out for dinner. Big steaks that come with bread and butter, salad and soup, choice of potato, which included frech fries, and ice cream for dessert. The soup of the day was...wait for it...beef chili. And, of courss, you can get a host of fatty sauces for your steak. I saw people ordering apetizers and steaks with all the trimmings. I had the 18 oz. rib eye, roasted red potatoes and salad, skipping the chili and ice cream. They waiter thought I was a bit daft. Nearly everywhere I went I saw very large people.

    As far back as '99, when I rode across the country, I was astonished at what people were eating and the portions sizes, especially in the midwest. One night we went out to dinner near Lake Itsasca in MN. The place advertised all you can eat fish baskets. Sounded healthy enough. Turns out it was deep fried perch. Same sort of thing happened later in IA. Ordered the cat fish special at a small town cafe. I was brought not one, but two big, deep fried catfish. The next day, we got hosted in Davenport for two days. In return for the host allowing 13 strangers to crash all over his house, we took him to The Machine Shed, a noted local place. There was a 22 oz. stuffed pork chop on the menu. The sides were served family style, in giant bowls. Nearly everyone there was large. When they say down they had these looks on their faces that said "Bring it on!" After dinner, we went to some famous local ice cream place. The sundaes and other concoctions locals were eating were made with 5 or more scoops of ice cream and toppings like butterscotch sause and mounds of whipped cream. You could buy 5 gallon tubs of ice cream to take home.

  12. #12
    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
    I recently got back from riding in Montana. One night I stayed in Butte and went out for dinner. Big steaks that come with bread and butter, salad and soup, choice of potato, which included frech fries, and ice cream for dessert. The soup of the day was...wait for it...beef chili. And, of courss, you can get a host of fatty sauces for your steak. I saw people ordering apetizers and steaks with all the trimmings. I had the 18 oz. rib eye, roasted red potatoes and salad, skipping the chili and ice cream. They waiter thought I was a bit daft. Nearly everywhere I went I saw very large people. . .
    There is a marketing trend that has been around since at least the late sixties, but has really gained traction in the last twenty years. That is restaurants making a name for them selves by faking quality wit huge portions. We're talking Guinness book stuff here. There's a show on one of the cable channels where this guy goes around the country to all these places taking all of these "challenges" to finish 5 lb hamburgers and such.

    From about 1980 to 1987, I lived right behind such a place. The owner was Greek, so it was a pretty standard Gyro Joint, but he did a fair amount of HUGE PORTION marketing. Onion rings in a full sized order bag, a "breakfast burrito" that included three scrambled eggs, sausage and a full order of hash browns. The thing is, the food wasn't very good. That place is still there, and he has opened three other outlets.

    In the restaurant business, labor is a larger operating cost than raw ingredients. This means they can double the portion size without substantially lowering their margin, especially if those ingredients are really cheap, like potatoes.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

  13. #13
    Senior Member mrodgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CommuteCommando View Post
    There is a marketing trend that has been around since at least the late sixties, but has really gained traction in the last twenty years. That is restaurants making a name for them selves by faking quality wit huge portions. We're talking Guinness book stuff here. There's a show on one of the cable channels where this guy goes around the country to all these places taking all of these "challenges" to finish 5 lb hamburgers and such.
    It's not just fat people. This is impressive:

    The Pennsylvania Center for the Book - Denny's Beer Barrel Pub

    It wasn’t until January 2005, when a petite 100-pound girl from New Jersey viewed pictures of the gigantic 96er online and decided to take the trip to give it a try. 2 hours and 54 minutes into the competition, 19-year-old Kate Stelnick became the first to overcome the daunting task and did so just within the 3 hour time limit. To put this accomplishment into perspective, the ingredients of the 96er are as follows:
    • 6 pounds of ground beef
    • 2 whole tomatoes
    • head of lettuce
    • 12 slices of American cheese
    • A full cup of peppers
    • 2 entire onions
    • Generous portions of ketchup, mustard, and mayonnaise

    Toppings included, this gargantuan burger weighs in at about 11 pounds, more than 10 percent of Kate’s body weight. For her triumph, she received a special certificate, a t-shirt, as well as having the $23.95 tab for the burger picked up by the Pub. Kate will always be recognized as the first to complete the task and rightfully deserves credit for taking the eating challenges to a new level.
    This is about an hour from my house. I've never eaten there so can't say anything about quality of their food (typical is people trying to eat the 1 lb. burger.) Folks at work that have been there tell me the "normal" food isn't that good.

    They have a lot of specialty big burgers now. Largest I remember was 50 lb burger last I looked. On the menu now is the "Beer Barrel Main Event Burger, great for special events, graduation parties, and family reunions. It weighs in at 125 lb. I don't want to know the price of that one since 2 up from that is the $129.99 Burgernator at 25 lb.

    Some pictures around the web to get your arteries clogging up





    Last edited by mrodgers; 07-07-14 at 10:59 AM.
    Ride no faster than your Guardian Angel can fly!

  14. #14
    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
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    You can look at a lot of cases like that, and Nathan's Hotdog contest as examples, but those are the exceptions, not the rule. Competitive eaters train, and that training does not include actually consuming those amounts of food regularly. People who eat a lot, gain weight, unless they burn a lot of it off.

    I have seen a lot of thin people who "eat like pigs and never gain weight". I put that in quotes because this involves some slight of hand. I have seen people pile food onto plates at picnics and buffets, only to surreptitiously throw most of it in the trash, while most people will be fooled into actually thinking they eat all of that.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

  15. #15
    Senior Member ill.clyde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post

    As far back as '99, when I rode across the country, I was astonished at what people were eating and the portions sizes, especially in the midwest. One night we went out to dinner near Lake Itsasca in MN. The place advertised all you can eat fish baskets. Sounded healthy enough. Turns out it was deep fried perch. Same sort of thing happened later in IA. Ordered the cat fish special at a small town cafe. I was brought not one, but two big, deep fried catfish. The next day, we got hosted in Davenport for two days. In return for the host allowing 13 strangers to crash all over his house, we took him to The Machine Shed, a noted local place. There was a 22 oz. stuffed pork chop on the menu. The sides were served family style, in giant bowls. Nearly everyone there was large. When they say down they had these looks on their faces that said "Bring it on!" After dinner, we went to some famous local ice cream place. The sundaes and other concoctions locals were eating were made with 5 or more scoops of ice cream and toppings like butterscotch sause and mounds of whipped cream. You could buy 5 gallon tubs of ice cream to take home.
    I couldn't agree more ... the midwest is a seeming hot bed of overindulgence food wise. Lots is said about the south, and fat southerners eating all that fried food, but please ... we midwesterners are just as bad. We're not all about the fried food, but boy can we put away the food when we want to. Must be some sort of inferiority complex we have since we're "flyover country."

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    Here is an article on a survey showing that Australians appear to be "giving in and giving up" and becoming more obese. The messages are mixed, however. Some people are doing fine in keeping fit and lean, while others, portrayed as in low socio-economic groups are becoming unfitter and more obese.
    Dream. Dare. Do.

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    Don't forget sugar - it's the cheapest bulking agent that the food industry can ram into processed food apart from water.
    If you try to avoid it you'll soon become very used to reading every food label like a hawk. I was surprised to find out that I was better off eating two eggs for breakfast (150 calories on average) rather than a bowl of muesli (230 calories per small bowl).

  18. #18
    Senior Member mrodgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Morat View Post
    Don't forget sugar - it's the cheapest bulking agent that the food industry can ram into processed food apart from water.
    If you try to avoid it you'll soon become very used to reading every food label like a hawk. I was surprised to find out that I was better off eating two eggs for breakfast (150 calories on average) rather than a bowl of muesli (230 calories per small bowl).
    I started eating Cheerios because of the sugar. I am a cereal breakfast kind of guy, done with breakfast in 2 minutes and moving on to get out the door and go to work. I was buying and eating all the "adult good cereal" until it and my kids' sugary cereal was sitting there in the cupboard with the nutrition label showing side by side. The sugary cereal had 13 grams of sugar, and all my "good adult" cereal also had 11-13 grams of sugar. So much for "good" cereal. Now I just eat Cheerios and I think it has 1 gram of sugar. 2 servings for 200 calories which is pretty much a full bowl (strawberries or banana added.)
    Ride no faster than your Guardian Angel can fly!

  19. #19
    Senior Member CommuteCommando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrodgers View Post
    I started eating Cheerios because of the sugar. I am a cereal breakfast kind of guy, done with breakfast in 2 minutes and moving on to get out the door and go to work. I was buying and eating all the "adult good cereal" until it and my kids' sugary cereal was sitting there in the cupboard with the nutrition label showing side by side. The sugary cereal had 13 grams of sugar, and all my "good adult" cereal also had 11-13 grams of sugar. So much for "good" cereal. Now I just eat Cheerios and I think it has 1 gram of sugar. 2 servings for 200 calories which is pretty much a full bowl (strawberries or banana added.)
    When I was about eight or nine I got hooked on Cheerios because at that time, the late sixties, they had a promotion on the box where if you sent in one dollar, and two box tops, they sent you a couple of model planes. These were just printed on stiff poster board. You cut them out, folded along some dotted lines, stuck some tabs in some die cut holes and taped it all together. Put a penny in the nose for balance, tie a string to one wingtip, whip them around, and those puppies actually flew, and flew good.

    I had a blast. Low in sugar and got some exersize too.

    The Cheerios? I ate it with out adding sugar because I was in a hurry to get at those box tops. Learned to like it that way.

    EDIT You got two of four planes for a buck, I got the Grumman Hellcat and ME 109. The other two, which I got two boxes later were a P-51, and a Mitsubishi A6M Zero.
    Last edited by CommuteCommando; 07-09-14 at 02:47 PM.
    As much as you paid for that Beemer [Mercedies, Audi, Escalade], I'm surprised it didn't come equipped with turn signals.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
    Here is an article on a survey showing that Australians appear to be "giving in and giving up" and becoming more obese. The messages are mixed, however. Some people are doing fine in keeping fit and lean, while others, portrayed as in low socio-economic groups are becoming unfitter and more obese.
    Maybe it's helpful to put in the link, eh?

    New Medibank and Roy Morgan research shows we?re giving up on being healthy | News.com.au
    Dream. Dare. Do.

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