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  1. #1
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    Wanting to get into Bicycling. Help!?

    Hello Friends!

    My name is John. And I've big big all of my life. Since about the 3rd grade. I was over 250lbs in the 8th grade, and in September of 2013 I made the decision to be healthy. I did a ton of research on how to lose weight the gimmick-free way, in a way that would radically change my lifestyle. I didn't want to diet, I wanted to change. I discovered a lot about how calories work and how weight loss works. Realized the metabolism isn't as varied as Dr. Oz and related ilk make it sound; and that I could lose weight!

    Around September 20th, I was ready to start. I emptied out my house of food. Threw basically everything away. The "sunk cost" fallacy is a fallacy that says keeping something simply because you've already bought it is a bad reason to keep something. If it doesn't add value, get rid of it. That's was an important 'step one' because it also meant I didn't need to finish my plate, or eat unhealthy foods just because they were given to me. I only needed to put into my body what helped me reached my goal. Period. No cheat days, no excuses. After taking a couple garbage bags worth of fried and processed foods and replacing them with fresh veggies, lean meats (chicken and salmon mostly), and tossing out all of the bags of sugar I used to make my 3-cups-of-sugar-per-gallon-of-tea sweet tea. I also bought two scaled, one for my food, and one for me (A wii fit balance board, actually, for me). Stepped on and I was at 341 pounds.

    This morning, I was at 228 pounds. I lost most of that weight between September 2013 and May 2014. Over the summer we moved and I had a lot going on and I got really bad about not excercising and not keeping track of my food. At all. I still don't eat unhealthy foods, but I wasn't keeping a close eye on it. I didn't gain, but I didn't lose. Actually, I consider that a victory. It means my lifestyle change worked! I was at about 240 then and am now down to 228.

    I'm wanting to get into bicycling to improve my overall fitness. And I'm looking for suggestions. My last bike was a mountain bike as a kid. I have NO idea where to start. Gear and clothing, a bike, what do I need? I want something comfortable, and I want to ride on the road (at this point, not a lot of interest in off-road riding). And of course, the goal here is fitness. I live just outside of a small town on a curvy 30mph road with varying hills, 3 miles from my office and about 5 miles from a park. So there's no need, at this point, to haul the bike. If that matters.

    I am really into long distance motorcycle riding, and I know I love being out and exploring roads. Though I won't be doing the 400+ mile days I do on my motorcycle; I think I'd like to do some of that back roads riding under my own power!

    Thoughts?


    Thanks guys and gals!

  2. #2
    Senior Member zonatandem's Avatar
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    Buy a used bike. See if upright bars or drop bars work best for you.
    A hybrid type bike may be OK to start; but drop bars allow you more hand positions.
    If you are 3 miles from work, try commuting to work when weather conditions permit (like no rain/snow).
    On weekends head for the park 5 miles away; take a coffee break and pedal back home.
    That would be a great start!
    Clothing: eventually buy a pair cycling shorts, fingerless/padded cycling gloves and a helmet.
    Later if you really like bicycling then start looking for a better bike and maybe a jersey and cycling shoes.
    You've done great so far!
    Pedal on!
    Rudy/zonatandem

  3. #3
    Hi-Tech Redneck Johnny Mullet's Avatar
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    I started out with a mountain bike and rode all summer long. Lost more weight than ever since I started cycling.
    Find some awesome places to ride in Ashtabula, Ohio
    Ashtabula Crank Bicycle Club - Search us on Facebook

  4. #4
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    Welcome!

    Hopefully you have a couple Local Bike Stores (LBS) around... i would visit them and see which one you feel the most comfortable with... then start doing some test rides!

    I would start out looking at the hybrids as they can be very versatile. You can always add bar-ends for my hand positions... My GT Tachyon actually had little mini-bar ends and they work great. I think a hybrid may also be less intimidating than going right to a road bike and a mountain bike maybe a bit of overkill if you are sticking with roads or paved paths...

    Also pay attention to the seats! Some of the "comfy" bikes come with rather LARGE seats... they may look and seem comfy, but after a few miles they are not so comfy! And speaking of seats, don't be alarmed when it takes a couple weeks to get your bottom used to sitting on a bike seat!


    And yes, definitely pick up a helmet and some bike shorts!

  5. #5
    Senior Member GravelMN's Avatar
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    If exploring is your thing, consider a touring bike. They are similar to a road bike but with a more relaxed geometry, slightly longer wheel base, the ability to take bigger tires, and a more upright riding position (this can be adjusted by the user). Touring bikes are generally robust and designed for durability. Even so, some are surprisingly quick and agile. Touring bikes have the added advantage of plenty of mounts for racks, fenders and other accessories should your exploring take you places on less than ideal roads. You can get tires from standard 25mm road bike tires to 38+ all surface tires that are right at home on gravel roads and even some single track trails.

    If you are looking for something a bit more aggressive, but like the all-surface idea, a cyclocross bike might be a good bet. More aggressive geometry but it can still take wider tires and some hard use.

    Used is a great place to start, but make sure you get a bike that fits you well. Your LBS can be a big help.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by zonatandem View Post
    Buy a used bike. See if upright bars or drop bars work best for you.
    A hybrid type bike may be OK to start; but drop bars allow you more hand positions.
    If you are 3 miles from work, try commuting to work when weather conditions permit (like no rain/snow).
    On weekends head for the park 5 miles away; take a coffee break and pedal back home.
    That would be a great start!
    Clothing: eventually buy a pair cycling shorts, fingerless/padded cycling gloves and a helmet.
    Later if you really like bicycling then start looking for a better bike and maybe a jersey and cycling shoes.
    You've done great so far!
    Pedal on!
    Rudy/zonatandem
    Thanks!

    I've been leaning towards a hybrid bike. I've ridden a variety of types of motorcycles; and sportbikes (with an aggressive leaned-forward geometry) are very uncomfortable for me. I ride a cruiser (ever so slightly leaned back, feet forward, bars up. Sort of a 'sitting at the dining room table' position), my stepdad rides a sport touring bike (sort of in between the two); and that works for me too.

    A quick, probably dumb; question about commuting. I'm all for commuting my short little jaunt to my office. But I wear slacks (sometimes nice looking bluejeans), polished shoes, and a collared shirt (occasionally a tie and even the odd vest or sweater!) Not sure if that sort of attire would give me issues riding a bicycle to work? Changing when I get there isn't really an option. I mean I guess I COULD; but.. uh.. I don't want to! Ha!

    Edit: And one more thing to note; I bring a soft-sided leather briefcase with me. Is that pretty doable with a rack? (I have a tour pak [trunk] on my motorcycle it goes in).

    Quote Originally Posted by scrming View Post
    Welcome!

    Hopefully you have a couple Local Bike Stores (LBS) around... i would visit them and see which one you feel the most comfortable with... then start doing some test rides!

    I would start out looking at the hybrids as they can be very versatile. You can always add bar-ends for my hand positions... My GT Tachyon actually had little mini-bar ends and they work great. I think a hybrid may also be less intimidating than going right to a road bike and a mountain bike maybe a bit of overkill if you are sticking with roads or paved paths...

    Also pay attention to the seats! Some of the "comfy" bikes come with rather LARGE seats... they may look and seem comfy, but after a few miles they are not so comfy! And speaking of seats, don't be alarmed when it takes a couple weeks to get your bottom used to sitting on a bike seat!


    And yes, definitely pick up a helmet and some bike shorts!
    Thanks! And it sounds like bicycle seats have the same issue as motorcycle seats. Big wide padded seats feel great in the showroom but you quickly realize that the guys on the bikes with the small, firm saddles are going a heck of a lot farther than you are and aren't about to give up and just walk home. Ha! I have an aftermarket (flatter and firmer) seat on my motorcycle.

    Helmet, for sure. And the bike shorts; check! (Guess I should've mentioned in the OP that a helmet is a given. I wouldn't consider riding without one. I like my head).

    I have no idea what sort of bike store options I have, I'll have to look! There's nothing in town or in the immediate area (this isn't the sort of community where bicycles are all that popular. Plenty of liquor stores and farm implement dealers; but I'd probably have to head towards St. Louis to get to a bike store. But that's no biggie.)

    Quote Originally Posted by GravelMN View Post
    If exploring is your thing, consider a touring bike. They are similar to a road bike but with a more relaxed geometry, slightly longer wheel base, the ability to take bigger tires, and a more upright riding position (this can be adjusted by the user). Touring bikes are generally robust and designed for durability. Even so, some are surprisingly quick and agile. Touring bikes have the added advantage of plenty of mounts for racks, fenders and other accessories should your exploring take you places on less than ideal roads. You can get tires from standard 25mm road bike tires to 38+ all surface tires that are right at home on gravel roads and even some single track trails.

    If you are looking for something a bit more aggressive, but like the all-surface idea, a cyclocross bike might be a good bet. More aggressive geometry but it can still take wider tires and some hard use.

    Used is a great place to start, but make sure you get a bike that fits you well. Your LBS can be a big help.
    Thanks! A touring bike sounds right up my alley.

    This is just a curiosity question (because I'm infinitely new at this); what's the advantage of a used bike for $250 over some of the inexpensive new bikes for $250? For example, Schwinn and some others have some hybrid bikes at a pretty low price. Both in the big box sporting good stores and even some of the all-in-one places like Target. (P.S., I don't even have any of THOSE close by. The nearest Wal-Mart is about 20 minutes. There's a target 40 minutes away. Ha!). I'm going to assume that, like anything else; you can get a better value in something used than something lower-cost and used. (Like when I bought my wifes gently-used current-model-year car. A few thousand miles, leather and all the acoutrouments; for the price of a base-model used.) But what; specifically, makes those used bikes a better deal? I guess I'm asking what to look for. What makes a great bike at a reasonable cost?

    For example, a cursory glance yields these two free shipping (with prime) offerings from Schwinn with good reviews:

    http://www.amazon.com/Schwinn-Discov...s=touring+bike

    This one is simultaneously marketed as a "hybrid" and a "comfort" bike. Which one is it?

    http://www.amazon.com/Schwinn-Networ...9882609&sr=1-2

    This one reviews well and is dirt cheap at $199 shipped.

    Not saying I want to buy either of those (do I?) But for the sake of me learning and being an informed purchaser; what do I get for a similarly priced USED bike that I don't get with having one of those shipped to my door?

    My wife wants to ride with me; which is great for me (I'd much rather not ride alone). So that squeezes the budget too, as that means the purchase of two bikes in the near future, and all of the related ilk. (She rides her own motorcycle, too).
    Last edited by RomansFiveEight; 12-29-14 at 01:56 PM.

  7. #7
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  8. #8
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    Before you buy one of those - decide what you really want to commit to. If just an occasional ride around the block, either would be fine. If a ride on a local trail once a month, ditto...

    If you are really serious about riding, visit a local bike shop, and start looking at more durable and dependable bikes.

    If you are a decent bike mechanic, you can keep any of them usable/

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


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  9. #9
    Senior Member Willbird's Avatar
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    There is a whole science to riding fast without working up a sweat, I have run across that concept when reading some bike mechanics stuff related to Internal Geared Hubs.

    But I started riding my Trek 7200 Hybrid because I HAD it, and it served me well for around 2,000 miles, I have a road bike now too (Fuji 1.5) but the hybrid is my nasty weather bike, and I put a carbide studded rear tire on it for winter.

    The typically wide range of gearing on a hybrid is nice if there are hills, and if you are not yet a strong rider (nobody is on day 1). They will do fine on non paved trails too.

    As far as clothing goes, if you you are not shy a pair of padded Lycra bike shorts or bibs (I vastly prefer bibs now) is a HUGE help, I would suggest getting them sooner rather than later, non cycling clothing has seams in places that will literally rub right through your skin.

    Putting a general location in your profile will help people know what the year round weather is like where you live, and help people steer you to good bike shops in your area :-).

    For everything from the waist up I LOVE the Target C9 Duo Dri clothing...it does not offer the back pockets of a true bike Jersey, but it is totally nice otherwise, and can be used as layers UNDER a Jersey if you do decide to buy one later.

    I was just in my LBS today and we were talking about a Fuji Absolute he had there, one example of a bike that might be a great one to start with. 228 is not super heavy, I started riding at 280. 32 spoke wheels should do you fine, they worked for me from 280lb to today and I have never had to have a wheel touched in around 2000 miles.

  10. #10
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    Last edited by 10 Wheels; 12-29-14 at 03:08 PM.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willbird View Post
    There is a whole science to riding fast without working up a sweat, I have run across that concept when reading some bike mechanics stuff related to Internal Geared Hubs.
    shoot... with my overactive sweat glands, i just THINK about going for a ride and I start sweating! Nice thing about them though is i can easily ride when it's 100 degrees out! LOL

  12. #12
    Senior Member Willbird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrming View Post
    shoot... with my overactive sweat glands, i just THINK about going for a ride and I start sweating! Nice thing about them though is i can easily ride when it's 100 degrees out! LOL
    That will change some as you get more fit :-).....but I must admit I have never tried to NOT work up a sweat while exerting myself :-).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Willbird View Post
    That will change some as you get more fit :-).....but I must admit I have never tried to NOT work up a sweat while exerting myself :-).
    Nope... i have ALWAYS been that way... even when I was in amazing shape and racing! Used to drive my Mom crazy... 100 degrees out and i would go out and ride a century... can still hear her, "You are going to kill yourself!" "Mom, it's all about HYDRATION!" LOL

    Sorry, for the thread-jacking... but actually does bring up a valid point... make sure you take some water on your rides! Dehydration is no joke! Learn to drink BEFORE you are thirsty!

  14. #14
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    howdy -
    +1 on recommendations for a touring bike, or if you go used, what might be getting labeled as a "gravel road" bike.
    -100 on getting a cheapo big box store or Amazon Schwinn - don't expect an understanding bike mechanic if you roll your bike into a shop and it's from Walmart.
    As far as learning something about the kind of riding some of your posts indicated, give this a read: Just Ride: A Radically Practical Guide to Riding Your Bike: Grant Petersen: 9780761155584: Amazon.com: Books
    I think it's ok to order it from Amazon.... or you can go to the source: Lugged Steel Bicycles, Wool Clothing, Leather Saddles & Canvas Bike Bags from Rivendell Bicycle Works - the author's company website.
    If you've got padded bike shorts - fine. Before spending more on bike shorts, read up on Brooks B17 saddles. Firm. Wide. I go both ways when I ride my Brooks, sometimes with, sometimes without bike shores.
    For what it's worth, all my bikes are from the last century - my race bike I purchased in the 90s, my old MTB I got for free and converted into a touring bike, my Trek 1400 I'm using for a fast riding "club" bike, my trail bike is an old too-small MTB, and I'm building up an old Nishiki frame/fork into a gravel / light touring bike.
    New is good to - I'd love to get a Surly CrossCheck or LHT. Those are at a price point you should consider ($1500) where quality meets a not outrageous price in bike terms. Order it through your LBS so they will be happy when you come in...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrming View Post


    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    Before you buy one of those - decide what you really want to commit to. If just an occasional ride around the block, either would be fine. If a ride on a local trail once a month, ditto...

    If you are really serious about riding, visit a local bike shop, and start looking at more durable and dependable bikes.

    If you are a decent bike mechanic, you can keep any of them usable/
    That's what I wanted to know, thanks! I'm mechanically handy when it comes to cars and motorcycle; but I've never worked on a bicycle.


    Thanks everyone! I swung over to a bike shop in Washington, MO (Revolution Cycles). I rode a couple of bikes around the parking lot. Found a hybrid 'comfort' bike to be really comfy but even in the parking lot I was running towards the end of the gearing. I can't imagine that leaves me much room to grow. According to the owner of the LBS, I needed something a little bigger, a bit more aggressive (riding position wise). Based on 'watching me ride' he said. And who am I to argue with a guy who knows infinitely more than I do?

    So far, the winner is a Fuji Absolute 2.1. It's more than I wanted to spend, but I can get into it new for about $460. Although I have some reservations about spending that much; I would also hate to save $100 and then not ride because I didn't enjoy the bike.

    Thoughts?

    You guys are fantastic, you know that? Very rarely have I gotten this much input this quickly on a forum.

    (Oh, and no worries on Hydration. Staying hydrated has been a part of me getting fit from day one. It helps me eat less, and feel better. Once in a while I get a comment because my motorcycle has a cupholder and it gets a fresh bottle of water every time I stop! And that's just sitting on my butt twisting a throttle.)

  16. #16
    aka Phil Jungels Wanderer's Avatar
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    Good choice = you got a decent bike. Now ride the rubber off it.

    There are a lot of good tutorials on any part you want to fix/maintain/replace. Utube or otherwise

    "Retirement is the best job I ever had!" Me, 2009


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wanderer View Post
    Good choice = you got a decent bike. Now ride the rubber off it.

    There are a lot of good tutorials on any part you want to fix/maintain/replace. Utube or otherwise
    Haven't bought it yet. Let's say I'm 99% committed to it. But it'll have to be ordered, as he was of the opinion (again, who am I to argue) that the one he had in the shop was too small and he needed the next size larger for me. Which sounds good to me, as I'd much rather be stretched out than too cramped.

    Doing a little last minute shopping. He had a whopping 2 used bikes in his shop. Looking around to see if there are any other used options out there before I call him and 'confirm' I want to order it. As I said, $460 is beyond what I had originally intended to spend (About $300).

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by RomansFiveEight View Post
    Haven't bought it yet. Let's say I'm 99% committed to it. But it'll have to be ordered, as he was of the opinion (again, who am I to argue) that the one he had in the shop was too small and he needed the next size larger for me. Which sounds good to me, as I'd much rather be stretched out than too cramped.

    Doing a little last minute shopping. He had a whopping 2 used bikes in his shop. Looking around to see if there are any other used options out there before I call him and 'confirm' I want to order it. As I said, $460 is beyond what I had originally intended to spend (About $300).
    How tall are you?...What size did the bike shop say you needed?
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by RomansFiveEight View Post
    Thanks!


    A quick, probably dumb; question about commuting. I'm all for commuting my short little jaunt to my office. But I wear slacks (sometimes nice looking bluejeans), polished shoes, and a collared shirt (occasionally a tie and even the odd vest or sweater!) Not sure if that sort of attire would give me issues riding a bicycle to work? Changing when I get there isn't really an option. I mean I guess I COULD; but.. uh.. I don't want to! Ha!





    This is just a curiosity question (because I'm infinitely new at this); what's the advantage of a used bike for $250 over some of the inexpensive new bikes for $250? For example, Schwinn and some others have some hybrid bikes at a pretty low price. Both in the big box sporting good stores and even some of the all-in-one places like Target. (P.S., I don't even have any of THOSE close by. The nearest Wal-Mart is about 20 minutes. There's a target 40 minutes away. Ha!). I'm going to assume that, like anything else; you can get a better value in something used than something lower-cost and used. (Like when I bought my wifes gently-used current-model-year car. A few thousand miles, leather and all the acoutrouments; for the price of a base-model used.) But what; specifically, makes those used bikes a better deal? I guess I'm asking what to look for. What makes a great bike at a reasonable cost?
    Riding with slacks: you can get straps to secure your pants leg against your leg so the pants don't get caught in the bike. If it's rained recently and you don't have fenders, you can end up with a stripe of dirt on your back. And sweat issues vary from person to person, and with the area you live in.

    Walmart/other discount store bikes: Okay for a little bit of riding, but stuff wears out on them faster and bike shops laugh at you when you take them in to get fixed. The bike I started riding on cost $150 at Academy and lasted about six or eight months before it broke beyond repair. And during that time, I had to replace brake pads and cables, replace pedals several times, tighten up various parts over and over. The bike I have now cost $550 and I've been riding it for a couple of years. It's had to go back to the LBS for repairs 3 times, the most expensive was $25 when I broke the axle (at about 400lbs). I bought my bike new because I'm short and I was quite heavy when I bought it, which made it more difficult for me to find a used bike. I got tired of looking for the right one and just bought a new one. My husband and our kids have good bikes that I bought on Craigslist. The kids ride 30 miles a week with me (split into 5 days) and their bikes haven't needed any repairs at all.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judi View Post
    Riding with slacks: you can get straps to secure your pants leg against your leg so the pants don't get caught in the bike. If it's rained recently and you don't have fenders, you can end up with a stripe of dirt on your back. And sweat issues vary from person to person, and with the area you live in.

    Walmart/other discount store bikes: Okay for a little bit of riding, but stuff wears out on them faster and bike shops laugh at you when you take them in to get fixed. The bike I started riding on cost $150 at Academy and lasted about six or eight months before it broke beyond repair. And during that time, I had to replace brake pads and cables, replace pedals several times, tighten up various parts over and over. The bike I have now cost $550 and I've been riding it for a couple of years. It's had to go back to the LBS for repairs 3 times, the most expensive was $25 when I broke the axle (at about 400lbs). I bought my bike new because I'm short and I was quite heavy when I bought it, which made it more difficult for me to find a used bike. I got tired of looking for the right one and just bought a new one. My husband and our kids have good bikes that I bought on Craigslist. The kids ride 30 miles a week with me (split into 5 days) and their bikes haven't needed any repairs at all.
    As far as the dirt; when I ride my motorcycle to the office I usually wear an armored riding jacket (and overpants, too, if the weather is less than ideal or it had recently rained). For the same reason. Dirt, debris, bugs, etc. I imagine I could do something similar. I don't sweat much. Even after a 90 minute session at the gym running a mile and a half on the treadmill I'm a little "sticky", but not dripping like some folks.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10 Wheels View Post
    How tall are you?...What size did the bike shop say you needed?
    They said I needed the 23" version, and I rode a 23" version of another bike. I rode the 21" version of the Absolute and he felt that was too small.

    I'm about 6'1", maybe 6'2" on a good day. 35" Inseam. Long arms. In fact on my motorcycle, which is a fairly tall bike (With it leaning on it's kick stand my poor wife can sit on it and completely extend her leg on the side it's leaning on, and only hit the ground with her toes), I ride with my knees up level with the tank; even with forward footboards. (I have highway pegs to remedy that. My stepdad rode my bike and was not able to reach my highway pegs; but I ride with my feet on the highway pegs and knees still slightly bent)

  22. #22
    Senior Member Black wallnut's Avatar
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    My first adult bike was a Schwinn hybrid, still have it and ride it on occasion. Too upright for me and far to heavy. I put over 2000 miles on it in one year and that included a metric century. I also dumped lots of money into it. First was a wheelset. With the rear wheel upgraded to a cassette. Added bottle cages. Replaced the seat. First upgraded rear wheel developed issues so my LBS gave me full trade on a hand built 36 spoke wheel. That is about it and honestly after the first adjustments to the shifting it has just flat worked. $200 was initial price. FWIW my handbuilt rear wheel was close to $200 as well. My point is less expensive bikes can be serviceable although the components wear out quickly.

    I've since purchased several much more expensive bikes. I'm now a regular at my LBS, well more than that actually. Ride leader and on their emergency contact list provided to law enforcement and the alarm company. I think your best bet is to support your local bike shop. Buy local and enjoy the after sale benefits of local service from folks that know what they are doing. If you are a DIY type ask them to teach you. However if you choose to buy a box store bike they may also treat you well and provide the service you need, just expect that it will not be free.


    Mark

  23. #23
    Senior Member Willbird's Avatar
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    I think the Absolute is a decent bike, and the 8 speed stuff is really solid, some folks claim it is less picky about DERAILLEUR adjustments than 9-10-11 speed. My Hybrid is 28/38/48 up front, and 12-25 on the back, it was something like 12-32 and I put a flatter cassette on it...but you will have plenty of gear on both ends. IMHO you got a lot of bike there for that price :-). Fuji warranty is 1 yr too, and the shop where I bought mine gives me another 6mos on top of that.

    The most important thing IMHO is to keep tabs on tire pressure, weird that they airbrush out the valvestems in the Fuji photo's, I cannot see if it has Presta valves or Schraeder. If you can swing it I'd get a floor pump when you get the bike, it is the easiest way to check the tire pressure really :-).

    Bill

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    Pulled the trigger at the LBS on the 23" Absolute 2.1.

    And to be clear I was anticipating the box store bikes being a no-go. Just for the purposes of my own edification, I wanted to know 'why'.

    This morning I had a $300 budget for a Bicycle. I just spent $500 (with tax). Please tell me it doesn't get worse? Ha! The owner of the LBS says it'll be a few weeks before it comes in.

    Follow up question time! LBS has a 10% discount when you buy from them; I've also got some Amazon gift cards (and prime). Though I'll try to support the LBS as best I can.

    So I need a helmet and compression shorts. Suggestions? With motorcycle helmets, once you've gotten a helmet that meets the SNELL ratings; you're pretty much buying comfort and features. (Meaning a $250 helmet is as safe as a $1200 helmet, but the $1200 helmet has bluetooth, better ventilation, anti-fog technologies, maybe cool features like drop-down sunshades etc.) Is the same true of bike helmets?

    How about cold-weather riding? Missouri, so it's cold here most of the time in the winter. 30's and 40's. What are your suggestions (on a budget; just bought the bike, let's not go too crazy now) for keeping warm while riding?

    Thanks all!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Willbird View Post
    I think the Absolute is a decent bike, and the 8 speed stuff is really solid, some folks claim it is less picky about DERAILLEUR adjustments than 9-10-11 speed. My Hybrid is 28/38/48 up front, and 12-25 on the back, it was something like 12-32 and I put a flatter cassette on it...but you will have plenty of gear on both ends. IMHO you got a lot of bike there for that price :-). Fuji warranty is 1 yr too, and the shop where I bought mine gives me another 6mos on top of that.

    The most important thing IMHO is to keep tabs on tire pressure, weird that they airbrush out the valvestems in the Fuji photo's, I cannot see if it has Presta valves or Schraeder. If you can swing it I'd get a floor pump when you get the bike, it is the easiest way to check the tire pressure really :-).

    Bill
    Any reason I can't just use my regulated air compressor and nifty tire pressure inflator tool? (that has a tire pressure gauge built in). Similar to this (but not whatever chinese off brand this is):

    http://cx.cxmagazine.com/wp-content/...flator-cxm.jpgprestaflator-cxm.jpg

    The one I have clamps onto the valve stem (you don't even have to hold it on!), and you just pull the trigger, release to check pressure, pull the trigger, etc., repeat until the needle shows your desired pressure. Press the button on the side to release pressure if you've gone too far.

    That thing is a godsend for checking motorcycle/car tires (Which I do once a week). All in all takes me maybe 10 minutes in the garage (nice long air hose. A buddy of mine has a lift in his garage and an overhead air hose. Makes me drool.)

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