Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail
    Posts
    2,311
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Gunnar for a Clyde?

    Hey folks, long time no see. I'm still truckin. Hit 10,000 miles on my LHT and I'm thinking of buying a new roadie to celebrate the milestone.

    I'm looking at the Gunnar Fastlane and Hyper-X frames. At this point I'm thinking I'd like something a bit more sporty than the LHT, so I can keep up with my clubmates a bit easier. But I'm unsure of whether that's a wise choice. Will the shorter wheelbase cause issues for an uberclyde (350+)? Or are there any other considerations I should take into account?

    Other frames I'm looking at in the off-chance that I decide Gunnar isn't right for me are Surly Straggler, Kona Rove, and Salsa Vaya.

  2. #2
    Senior Member CliffordK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    863
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The LHT sounds like it should be a great bike. I'm not sure I'd rush to replace it. Have you tried other bikes? Friend's bikes?

    Both the Fastlane and Hyper-X sound like they accept big tires (38mm) which should be nice. Are these bare frames or complete bikes. The photos seem to indicate "enough" spokes.

    It is an American company. Send them a note and ask about rider weights.

    If I was getting a custom frame made, I would seriously ask about getting a 48h hub and 145mm rear dropout spacing, although that does put you pretty custom for replacement parts in the future too, although a steel frame should flex enough to mount a narrower wheel in a pinch.

    I'm not sure about the shorter wheelbase. Issues with touring are often related to too much weight too far back on a rack, and kicking one's bags. I don't like my folding bike because it is too short, and too upright, thus I have troubles keeping the front wheel on the ground when climbing.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail
    Posts
    2,311
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
    The LHT sounds like it should be a great bike. I'm not sure I'd rush to replace it. Have you tried other bikes? Friend's bikes?

    Both the Fastlane and Hyper-X sound like they accept big tires (38mm) which should be nice. Are these bare frames or complete bikes. The photos seem to indicate "enough" spokes.

    It is an American company. Send them a note and ask about rider weights.

    If I was getting a custom frame made, I would seriously ask about getting a 48h hub and 145mm rear dropout spacing, although that does put you pretty custom for replacement parts in the future too, although a steel frame should flex enough to mount a narrower wheel in a pinch.

    I'm not sure about the shorter wheelbase. Issues with touring are often related to too much weight too far back on a rack, and kicking one's bags. I don't like my folding bike because it is too short, and too upright, thus I have troubles keeping the front wheel on the ground when climbing.
    The big reason I'm looking for a new bike is because the cantilever brakes on it are sub-par for the hill rides I've begun doing in the past year. Pretty much every major downhill I've done has caused me to want to **** my pants, and I need a better braking solution. So I'm thinking discs are the way to go here.

    I actually run some pretty strong 32h wheels at the moment, and I've never had issues with my 36h's. As I'm on the optimistic side of weight loss, I'm probably just going to go with 32 or 36 again. Having gone 10,000 relatively trouble-free miles, I don't really feel 48h are necessary. What does the 145mm spacing get me, though? I've been running 135.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Wild Wonderful West Virginia
    My Bikes
    Gunnar Crosshairs, Surly Karate Monkey
    Posts
    249
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I bought a Crosshairs last August and really like it. It rides great and I weigh 280. I have no problems with the cantilever brakes, they are Avid Shoty 4's and I descend down some steep stuff here in West Virginia.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    818
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mithrandir View Post
    The big reason I'm looking for a new bike is because the cantilever brakes on it are sub-par for the hill rides I've begun doing in the past year. Pretty much every major downhill I've done has caused me to want to **** my pants, and I need a better braking solution. So I'm thinking discs are the way to go here.
    A cheaper option would be to just replace the fork and run disc on the front and keep the canti on the rear... then the LHT won't end up neglected. Not that I'd dare talk you out of a hyper-x which is on the top of my own to-get list.

  6. #6
    Senior Member CliffordK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    863
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mithrandir View Post
    What does the 145mm spacing get me, though? I've been running 135.
    The wider the dropout spacing, the less dishing required on the rear wheel. Thus, more of the weight is distributed between the right and left spokes, and theoretically a stronger wheel with fewer spokes.
    Ideally one could make a no-dish rear wheel which would be essentially as strong as the front wheels.

    Of course, that is really limited to the tandem market, but there is no reason why it could not be incorporated in a road bike.

    I suppose I don't see why a company wouldn't be able to make bikes specifically for heavyweights when working in the custom market.

    It does sound like you're doing well with your current bike. 10K miles is good!!!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    119
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
    It is an American company. Send them a note and ask about rider weights.
    .
    This. I did a custom and the owner, Richard Schwinn (yeah, THAT Schwinn) was great throughout the process. Mine was a Sport for my size and to clear 210mm cranks.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Wild Wonderful West Virginia
    My Bikes
    Gunnar Crosshairs, Surly Karate Monkey
    Posts
    249
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    669
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I was seriously considering a Gunnar Sport before coming across a very nice used Bianchi frame that I'm building up now. If the Bianchi doesn't work out, chances are good that I'll transfer the parts over to a Gunnar.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    northern Deep South
    My Bikes
    Fuji Touring, Novara Randonee
    Posts
    1,956
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mithrandir View Post
    The big reason I'm looking for a new bike is because the cantilever brakes on it are sub-par for the hill rides I've begun doing in the past year. Pretty much every major downhill I've done has caused me to want to **** my pants, and I need a better braking solution. So I'm thinking discs are the way to go here.
    If you want disc brakes, or a new bike, get them. I guess I'm cheap, so I'd start by trying new brake pads (Koolstop salmon), straddle cable, and/or cantilevers. You could solve the brake problem for $5-$50, or $1,000 plus.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    North of Boston
    My Bikes
    Kona Dawg, Surly 1x1, Karate Monkey, Rockhopper, Crosscheck , Burley Runabout,
    Posts
    2,183
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    One other thought, check out Zinn bikes, specializing in big bikes.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,675
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mithrandir View Post
    The big reason I'm looking for a new bike is because the cantilever brakes on it are sub-par for the hill rides I've begun doing in the past year. Pretty much every major downhill I've done has caused me to want to **** my pants, and I need a better braking solution. So I'm thinking discs are the way to go here.

    I actually run some pretty strong 32h wheels at the moment, and I've never had issues with my 36h's. As I'm on the optimistic side of weight loss, I'm probably just going to go with 32 or 36 again. Having gone 10,000 relatively trouble-free miles, I don't really feel 48h are necessary. What does the 145mm spacing get me, though? I've been running 135.
    I'm there with you about canti's. Didn't matter who set them up or how...
    Hills were a matter of faith, at 285 with a light pack.

    My BB7's are marvelous.

    Thought about a DT?
    I built up a custom,
    Tiagra STI's and 22,32,44 11-32 gearing.
    Likely about moving up a couple on the crank next chain, as I'm down to 250...

    48sp chukkers on ph disc hub... Never been out of true, not even after a hard landed airborne bit with about 50lbs in the pack.
    Overkill? YEP! but always get me home...

  13. #13
    Senior Member catonec's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    burlington VT.
    Posts
    2,338
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
    If you want disc brakes, or a new bike, get them.... I'd start by trying new brake pads (Koolstop salmon)....
    +1
    2010 Kestrel RT900SL, 800k carbon, chorus/record, speedplay, zonda
    1997 Trek ZX6000, 6061w/manitou spyder, xt/xtr, time atac

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Philly
    My Bikes
    IF SCJ SE, Surly LHT, BikeFriday NWT, Cannondale M300, Raleigh 700
    Posts
    4,475
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Null66 View Post
    I'm there with you about canti's. Didn't matter who set them up or how...
    Hills were a matter of faith, at 285 with a light pack.
    I don't understand this. My LHT with me and a full load for a camping and cooking tour is about that weight. The stock cantis have been fine for descending mountain passes, some of them unpaved, and steep eastern grades, even in rain, snow and sleet. Switching to Kool Stop Mountain Salmon pads has made them more effective.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Central MA
    Posts
    41
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Fastlane has heavier/stronger tubing than the Hyper-X, so it would be better suited to a Clydesdale, but I think in the larger stock sizes Gunnar also uses heavier/stronger tubing instead of the True Temper OX Platinum. Both have such close geometries that you probably couldn't tell the difference in handling, and both are well suited to the type of riding you're talking about. Something that can be ridden anywhere (dirt/gravel/trails/double or singletrack) but would also be right at home in fast group rides and centuries. That's exactly why I just had a Hyper-X built after demoing a Crosshairs on the Honey One Hundred, which I rode on Clement X'Plor MSO 40mm, which just barely fit.

    As noted above by laxpatrick, I've heard Richard Schwinn would probably talk with you on the phone to answer any of your questions if you called Gunnar/Waterford.

    Last edited by bgav; 01-19-15 at 09:53 AM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Minnesota
    My Bikes
    N+1=4
    Posts
    1,568
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a Gunnar Crosshairs. I selected the custom geometry option because of my long legs/short arms. They also built the bike based on my weight and I think they over did it (it's too stiff, IMO). You can get them to do anything you want if you work through your LBS. It was never flexible at all and after losing weight, it's even worse.

    Gunnar is a insanely conservative company. If you flag them on the weight issue, they'll probably overdo it (almost certainly would).

    If I had it to do over again, I'd probably build a Sport instead of a Crosshairs. It will fit the largest tires I need (35c) for unpaved trail riding anyhow and I like the geometry much better - more bottom bracket drop is good.

    J.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Mithrandir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Buffalo, NY
    My Bikes
    2012 Surly LHT, 1995 GT Outpost Trail
    Posts
    2,311
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    I have a Gunnar Crosshairs. I selected the custom geometry option because of my long legs/short arms. They also built the bike based on my weight and I think they over did it (it's too stiff, IMO). You can get them to do anything you want if you work through your LBS. It was never flexible at all and after losing weight, it's even worse.

    Gunnar is a insanely conservative company. If you flag them on the weight issue, they'll probably overdo it (almost certainly would).

    If I had it to do over again, I'd probably build a Sport instead of a Crosshairs. It will fit the largest tires I need (35c) for unpaved trail riding anyhow and I like the geometry much better - more bottom bracket drop is good.

    J.

    This is very helpful to me. I contacted Gunnar to see what they said, and they basically came back with "no way will our stock frames work for you, let's build something totally custom", which had me suspicious. They claim their frames are rated for up to 300 pounds. Likewise, the Surly LHT I've been riding for 4 years is rated the same, and I've had exactly zero issues with it. I'm thinking that a stock frame *will* be fine, and they're just trying to cover their asses.


    Now, about flex. What's the deal there? Some people tell me stiffer frames are better, some people say flexy frames are better. Personally, I feel a little weirded out when I feel my frame flexing... but you seem to think that is better? Any particular reason why?

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Minnesota
    My Bikes
    N+1=4
    Posts
    1,568
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mithrandir View Post
    This is very helpful to me. I contacted Gunnar to see what they said, and they basically came back with "no way will our stock frames work for you, let's build something totally custom", which had me suspicious. They claim their frames are rated for up to 300 pounds. Likewise, the Surly LHT I've been riding for 4 years is rated the same, and I've had exactly zero issues with it. I'm thinking that a stock frame *will* be fine, and they're just trying to cover their asses.


    Now, about flex. What's the deal there? Some people tell me stiffer frames are better, some people say flexy frames are better. Personally, I feel a little weirded out when I feel my frame flexing... but you seem to think that is better? Any particular reason why?
    What I want is a frame that is vertically compliant so that it absorbs road harshness but horizontally stiff so that there is no flex in the bottom bracket when you get up and honk on it. I own a number of bikes, with the most flexy frame being a steel Basso road racing frame from the late '80s that flexes so much in the BB that when you peddle hard you can make the FD rub and sometimes the RD shift. My son rides that bike now (220lb and strong) and the same thing happens for him. That's one end of the extreme.

    I also have a standard carbon fiber 2007 vintage Lemond Versailles. That is much stiffer and none of that happens, but there is some flex side to side in the bottom bracket. The Gunnar Crosshairs that I have is so stiff in the bottom bracket that there is no horizontal or vertical flex that I can see. It's really stiff and doesn't have as much vertical compliance as I would like and I attribute that to the overbuilding of the frame.

    My Crosshairs weighs in at about 22 lbs with tubular tires on Al rims. With clinchers, it would be around 23lbs. When I add up the component weights carefully and even give them a heavy fork weight, the frame still comes in at just under 4.7lbs. That's a massively heavy frame. The bike frame I'm having built right now for my road bike will be in stainless and lugged - all of that should be heavier - and it's going to come in at 3.8lbs or less (1725g) and a ~16 lb bike when done. When I had the Crosshairs built, I weighed in at 250. So this is a lot of overkill, IMO. I'm 25lbs less now and this is way too stiff of a frame for me. I feel more than I want from the road and that's on 28c tires. It was too stiff when I got it. At your weight, you should have a beefed up frame, but you don't want Gunnar to overdo it.

    I also think the geometry would matter and you should look into that. I think the Sport would give a better ride and you may want to consider that too. Take with your LBS about brakes etc... I think there is a version of both the Sport and Crosshairs that offers disc brakes.

    So what I'd do is have the custom frame option because you will need a stronger frame but I'd fudge the weight a bit to get it to be where you want it to be in terms of compliance etc... I'd also get their fork because the carbon forks would not work at your size.

    Gunnar is conservative and that's good. You just want them to manage it a little better. If you have a good LBS to work with, they can help you with that.

    That said, the Gunnar is a nice bike and it rides well. I use it for my adventure bike so it has a rack on the back and often a pannier or two for a day ride with my wife. It's a comfortable geometry for me, very predictable handling. I'm going to switch out the bars for a more compliant set (I have an AL bar on it now) and maybe the same with a seat post. I'll also be thinking pretty hard about changing to a CF fork this summer. All of that will help make up for the heavy build on the frame, lighten it up and make it more comfortable. I'm not worried about the weight of the bike, but adding some more vertical compliance to offset the Gunnar conservative build is good.

    J.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,675
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by indyfabz View Post
    I don't understand this. My LHT with me and a full load for a camping and cooking tour is about that weight. The stock cantis have been fine for descending mountain passes, some of them unpaved, and steep eastern grades, even in rain, snow and sleet. Switching to Kool Stop Mountain Salmon pads has made them more effective.
    Ok, yeah all told you're about that weight...
    But that's just me. Bike's 35.5 with racks, cages and such... Light pack is as low as 15 though can be 50 usually about 20.... 9lbs of water if it's hot. I was up to 350...
    The bike I had braking issues was a 2007 Fuji Tourer. And yes with Koolstops, salmon rear, slimline black front., A local Builder was the one who finally diagnosed it. He had me look at the fork while squeezing the handle, forks would bow outward. He suggested brake booster to stiffen the fork. But I had other issues with the Tourer, like tearing the rear wheel free and into the chain stay if I torqued up.

    I don't like walking home, especially in the heat, So I built up a custom DT. Only "issue" with this one is that the chain stays flex a bit in some circumstances and the speed/cadence sensor ticks against the magnet. Kind of trivial all things considered.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Null66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Garner, NC 27529
    My Bikes
    Built up DT, 2007 Fuji tourer (donor bike, RIP), 1995 1220 Trek
    Posts
    1,675
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    oh, forgot to mention I think the idea of a fork swap to get you a disc on the front would add the braking power you're looking for.

    BB7's work wonders for me!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •