Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

View Poll Results: Should I Frankenstein these two bikes?
Yes, do it! Do it! 0 0%
No, you're a dang fool. 4 100.00%
Voters: 4. You may not vote on this poll

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-19-15, 09:48 PM   #1
Ubermich
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NTX
Bikes:
Posts: 40
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Am I Crazy, Ignorant, or Both?

So I picked up my Trek 820 (approx 2003 I think?) to start training on in preparation of commuting in the fall. My wife then decides she wants a bike too. I see this as a fantastic problem! We find her a bike, but it's a package deal and I have to take a Magna Excitor as well.

So now I have my Trek and this Magna Excitor. I was thinking I'd turn around and see if I could get $20 for it. Then I rode it up the street and found it's really not as bad as I expected. It's significantly more comfortable on our non-maintained roads AND it sure feels lighter (though apparently I'm going to have to actually put it on a scale to verify since I can't find any specs). The only issues I have with it are the shifters, derailleurs, and hub.

Now I get that this is nowhere near most of your standards, but I'm wondering if I've stumbled upon an opportunity to improve my ride and learn a bit about the mechanicals. (I like to learn on the cheap stuff, since breaking expensive stuff is painful.)

The Trek 820 has nice indexed Shimano shifters with nice Shimano derailleurs. The front is a dual-pull. Both fronts are band clamp type. Both bikes are 3x7. If I get new cables and swap the rear wheel, derailleurs, and shifters (or more likely the whole handlebar and possibly stem) I should end up with a lighter bike that rides better over light bumps with the better hub and smooth shifting.

Am I thinking wrong or ignorant of something here?

To give a better idea, this is a street on my commute. This is considered a "well maintained street" with 1-2" vertical change in the seams you see.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg streetPatch.jpg (99.9 KB, 19 views)
Ubermich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-15, 10:11 PM   #2
ShortLegCyclist
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes: Many bikes in three states and two countries, mainly riding Moots Vamoots, Lynskey R265 disc and a Spot Denver Zephyr nowadays
Posts: 796
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 26 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ubermich View Post
So I picked up my Trek 820 (approx 2003 I think?) to start training on in preparation of commuting in the fall. My wife then decides she wants a bike too. I see this as a fantastic problem! We find her a bike, but it's a package deal and I have to take a Magna Excitor as well.

So now I have my Trek and this Magna Excitor. I was thinking I'd turn around and see if I could get $20 for it. Then I rode it up the street and found it's really not as bad as I expected. It's significantly more comfortable on our non-maintained roads AND it sure feels lighter (though apparently I'm going to have to actually put it on a scale to verify since I can't find any specs). The only issues I have with it are the shifters, derailleurs, and hub.

Now I get that this is nowhere near most of your standards, but I'm wondering if I've stumbled upon an opportunity to improve my ride and learn a bit about the mechanicals. (I like to learn on the cheap stuff, since breaking expensive stuff is painful.)

The Trek 820 has nice indexed Shimano shifters with nice Shimano derailleurs. The front is a dual-pull. Both fronts are band clamp type. Both bikes are 3x7. If I get new cables and swap the rear wheel, derailleurs, and shifters (or more likely the whole handlebar and possibly stem) I should end up with a lighter bike that rides better over light bumps with the better hub and smooth shifting.

Am I thinking wrong or ignorant of something here?

To give a better idea, this is a street on my commute. This is considered a "well maintained street" with 1-2" vertical change in the seams you see.


I wouldn't trust any part of that Magna to hold up over time, not the frame, welds, suspension, none of it.

Meanwhile the Trek 820 is a great bike and if in good shape can meet your needs for decades to come.

If you want to cushion the ride, see if the 820 will take balloon tires like Big Apples -- IMO those are just as good as suspension for the purpose of smoothing out rough streets, plus the 2003 820 had a suspension fork according to the Trek Archives.
ShortLegCyclist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-15, 10:20 PM   #3
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Bikes: '14 Trek 1.1, '10 Fuji Newest 3.0, '98 Cannondale R500, '88 Trek 360
Posts: 5,465
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 362 Post(s)
The 820 is a fine used bike with decades of life ahead of it.
Dave Cutter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-15, 10:24 PM   #4
Ubermich
Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: NTX
Bikes:
Posts: 40
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The 820 does have a suspension fork, but it is an RST and it is shot as far as I can tell. I tried adjusting the dampening at the top of the tubes and no matter what it almost bottoms out just pushing on it.
Ubermich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-15, 11:21 PM   #5
CliffordK 
Senior Member
 
CliffordK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Eugene, Oregon, USA
Bikes:
Posts: 10,967
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1429 Post(s)
If you want to tinker on the Magna, go for it.
Maybe go down to the local Co-op for some parts.... But there is no need to canibalize the Trek to fix up a $20 bike (to make a $25 bike).
CliffordK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-15, 05:34 AM   #6
bmthom.gis
Senior Member
 
bmthom.gis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Columbia, SC
Bikes: 2014 Cannondale Synapse Carbon 4 Rival; 2014 Cannondale Trail 7 29; 1972 Schwinn Suburban, 1996 Proflex 756, 1987(?) Peugeot, Trek Soho S; 1979 Raleigh Competition GS; 1992 Miyata Seven21, 1978 Raleigh Sports
Posts: 2,679
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 116 Post(s)
If you have a co op, go donate the Magna to them and see if they have a rigid fork for your 820 (if your shocks are shot). There is nothing on that Magna that will be of any use to you, but if it is working, your coop could probably find someone to give it to who is in need of free transportation.
bmthom.gis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-15, 07:09 AM   #7
jfowler85
Senior Member
 
jfowler85's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: I am where I'm at.
Bikes: You don't care about mine, I don't care about yours.
Posts: 1,793
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 76 Post(s)
Do it man, those are your bikes so feel free. Forget the posers; while the Trek is a fine bike, we all know that nearly every box shop bike frame comes from the same handful of PRC factories.
jfowler85 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:33 PM.