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Old 01-07-17, 07:24 PM   #26
canklecat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
...Then there are the Specialized road frames with the elastomers in the seat stays. I wonder how much effect they have.
Last year I tried a used Trek hybrid with Isozone frame (the dealer described it as a road bike frame with flat bars, not really the sort of hybrid I was looking for). Unfortunately my basis for comparison was flawed. I should have tried a standard road bike or rigid frame hybrid or mountain bike first. But I was coming from a very cushy comfort hybrid (Globe Carmel, spring suspension, padded and springy saddle, long wheelbase, soft tires), so the Trek felt harsh and jittery to me. But that's relative to my immediate experience.

Since then I've bought an older Univega rigid fork mountain bike and ride it most often now. It too felt harsh, tho' not as jittery because of the difference in the frame and curved fork compared with the newer hybrids. I tried three sets of tires before settling on Continental Speed Ride 700x42, which I can ride at 40-50 psi front, 50-60 psi rear.

I also swapped saddles around. The heavily padded spring saddle from the Globe felt comfortable, if a bit too wide, on the Univega. I'd have kept it that way but the Globe's seat post was too short for the Bell gel foam saddle from the Univega -- the Globe's original padded spring saddle was very tall. So I swapped back to the original configuration. The heavily padded spring saddle does cost some efficiency in exchange for comfort. There's quite a bit of bouncing with hard pedaling.

The experience persuaded me that a Brooks or Selle saddle with springs but less padding would suit me for the rigid fork mountain bike.

But as with my Globe comfort hybrid, tires and tire pressure made more difference than anything else. A wider, softer tire may be the most cost effective solution. Especially considering how expensive good saddles and the Thudbuster seat post are.

And much as I hate to admit it, my fitter cycling friends were correct that arms and legs can be effective shock absorbers. The problem was, after a 30 year hiatus from cycling, it took months for my arms and legs to get strong enough to be effective shock absorbers. But it takes me 15 minutes or so to warm up enough to use the arms and legs effectively. And those muscles tire after long rides, and the ride quickly becomes uncomfortable -- I've finished several 40-60 mile rides, but rarely enjoy the last 10 or so miles. So there's still a place for help from ergonomically friendly equipment.
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Old 01-07-17, 09:22 PM   #27
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For me an optimal saddle is vinyl covered with steel springs with a dip along the center, i.e. neither elastomer nor leather. When I found one I liked I bought a bunch of them and they appeared under different names in the market, including Avenir, but generally low prices. Such saddles are difficult to come by now, but I see something similar on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Zacro-Gel-Bik.../dp/B01K9H8PUU

except for the gel part, for me a put-off. The reviews are pretty good though.
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Old 01-07-17, 10:21 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canklecat View Post
Last year I tried a used Trek hybrid with Isozone frame (the dealer described it as a road bike frame with flat bars, not really the sort of hybrid I was looking for). Unfortunately my basis for comparison was flawed. I should have tried a standard road bike or rigid frame hybrid or mountain bike first. But I was coming from a very cushy comfort hybrid (Globe Carmel, spring suspension, padded and springy saddle, long wheelbase, soft tires), so the Trek felt harsh and jittery to me. But that's relative to my immediate experience.

Since then I've bought an older Univega rigid fork mountain bike and ride it most often now. It too felt harsh, tho' not as jittery because of the difference in the frame and curved fork compared with the newer hybrids. I tried three sets of tires before settling on Continental Speed Ride 700x42, which I can ride at 40-50 psi front, 50-60 psi rear.

I also swapped saddles around. The heavily padded spring saddle from the Globe felt comfortable, if a bit too wide, on the Univega. I'd have kept it that way but the Globe's seat post was too short for the Bell gel foam saddle from the Univega -- the Globe's original padded spring saddle was very tall. So I swapped back to the original configuration. The heavily padded spring saddle does cost some efficiency in exchange for comfort. There's quite a bit of bouncing with hard pedaling.

The experience persuaded me that a Brooks or Selle saddle with springs but less padding would suit me for the rigid fork mountain bike.

But as with my Globe comfort hybrid, tires and tire pressure made more difference than anything else. A wider, softer tire may be the most cost effective solution. Especially considering how expensive good saddles and the Thudbuster seat post are.

And much as I hate to admit it, my fitter cycling friends were correct that arms and legs can be effective shock absorbers. The problem was, after a 30 year hiatus from cycling, it took months for my arms and legs to get strong enough to be effective shock absorbers. But it takes me 15 minutes or so to warm up enough to use the arms and legs effectively. And those muscles tire after long rides, and the ride quickly becomes uncomfortable -- I've finished several 40-60 mile rides, but rarely enjoy the last 10 or so miles. So there's still a place for help from ergonomically friendly equipment.
Wider tyres and longer wheelbase (chainstay in particualr) make a lot of difference.
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Old 01-07-17, 10:59 PM   #29
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I tried about 8 or so different seats. I finally settled on this one as the most ergonomically correct, including for my man-parts.
Selle Royal - Men's Respiro Moderate

I also installed this suspension seat-post, and I can tell you this combination has been amazing for me. The seat practically disappears beneath you, and it literally feels like you're riding on air, with absolutely zero hot-spots or pressure points at all. Discomfort simply no-longer exists with this setup for me.
Suntour - NCX P12 Suspension Seat-post
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Old 01-22-17, 09:11 PM   #30
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I actually had the NCX suspension seatpost from Suntour. Never got a chance to try it, because my seatpost diameter is not standard (26.8mm).

With regard to sprung saddles, does anyone know if they make lighter weight springs? The springs in the B66/B67 line are way too thick to do much for me. Can you swap these out?

At the end of the day, I love the idea/look of a leather saddle. But I don't think the B67 springs will do much for me. The heavier Brooks saddles (B33, etc.) are...well heavy, and they also don't fit modern seat clamps.

Thoughts? I wish there was a way to customize the springs in a Brooks saddle to suit the rider's weight/needs.
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Old 01-22-17, 11:24 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalash74 View Post
I actually had the NCX suspension seatpost from Suntour. Never got a chance to try it, because my seatpost diameter is not standard (26.8mm).

With regard to sprung saddles, does anyone know if they make lighter weight springs? The springs in the B66/B67 line are way too thick to do much for me. Can you swap these out?

At the end of the day, I love the idea/look of a leather saddle. But I don't think the B67 springs will do much for me. The heavier Brooks saddles (B33, etc.) are...well heavy, and they also don't fit modern seat clamps.

Thoughts? I wish there was a way to customize the springs in a Brooks saddle to suit the rider's weight/needs.
Those springs are (properly) made to do the job on big bumps that send jolts down one's spine. While pedalling the saddle remains stationary and doesn't bounce. I'd never change it for a softer sprung version.
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Old 01-23-17, 01:42 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalash74 View Post
I actually had the NCX suspension seatpost from Suntour. Never got a chance to try it, because my seatpost diameter is not standard (26.8mm)...
Ah, that's unfortunate. The seat I also linked there is very comfortable. It has a a suspension built into it; it's definitely worth considering.

Last edited by AdvXtrm; 01-23-17 at 01:49 AM.
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Old 01-29-17, 08:33 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by AdvXtrm View Post
I also installed this suspension seat-post, and I can tell you this combination has been amazing for me. The seat practically disappears beneath you, and it literally feels like you're riding on air,
Suntour - NCX P12 Suspension Seat-post
That's the best description I've heard yet! I agree!!!
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Old 01-30-17, 11:26 AM   #34
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In my personal experience, the short travel is fine for a road bike, long travel better for big hits I take mountain biking

Quote:
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
the Long Travel Thud buster is more fine tunable than the short travel , splitting elastomers
+ the pre load bolt..

but if the post length out of the frame is not enough for the LT, then the ST is what works.

[I have one of each]
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Old 02-26-17, 06:16 AM   #35
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Personally I like a flyer or a b67_but the women I have ridden with, and so e put up pretty big miles, prefer the Walmart bell/ergo model. It looks too soft to me but 3 women I know love them.
Telecaster, is this the Bell Ergo model they like?

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Bell-Spor...Black/49706793
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Old 02-26-17, 08:18 AM   #36
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Telecaster, is this the Bell Ergo model they like?

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Bell-Spor...Black/49706793
Cerrtainly is!
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Old 02-26-17, 09:09 AM   #37
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I like the B17/B15 on my road bikes. Also have had 2 Brooks Professional models that were very comfortable, but both were older & well broken in. I don't think the B72 has been mentioned. The 1st Brooks, & most comfortable saddle I ever had, was a B72 on a Raleigh Sports I rode while in grad school & commuting back in the early 80's. It had very thick leather that was still stiff as new and still held its original shape save for 2 deep sit bone impressions (about twice as deep as those on any of my current broken in Brooks) where the leather was softer & pliable. My posterior fit the saddle well and within a week or 2 it became a perfect fit. Bike was a 1969, so 11 y.o. when I got it. In my ignorance, I sold the bike after 7 years of heavy use.

I'm small & light, 150 pounds now. Old & about 15# overweight. The B72 is lightly sprung & perfect for the semi-upright way I rode my 3 speed. I have both a B72 and B66 now, vintage saddles on bikes with lots of miles, that are comfortable enough but barely broken in compared to that 1st B72 years ago. I like the B72 more than the B66. Both don't appear to have ever had any Brooks Prufide applied until I got them. Don
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Old 03-11-17, 02:14 PM   #38
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RARE KOOBI PRS ALPH RED WHITE BLACK CUT OUT RACING SADDLE | eBay
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Old 03-11-17, 02:47 PM   #39
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@kalash74, what did you end up doing? There are straight seatposts available in aluminum, and you could put the double-rail seat clamp for a B-72 on one of them. The B-72 saddle doesn't have springs, but I've never felt it needed them. And your bike is cushy enough.
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Old 03-11-17, 08:07 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
@kalash74, what did you end up doing? There are straight seatposts available in aluminum, and you could put the double-rail seat clamp for a B-72 on one of them. The B-72 saddle doesn't have springs, but I've never felt it needed them. And your bike is cushy enough.
I have a B-17 on one of my bikes and it is very nice. It does have loop springs, but not the horizontal coil springs. I find it does a great job of smoothing out the bumps. The leather on my B-17 is thinner than what is on my B-17 Special, and was comfortable from day one.
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