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Old 12-31-16, 08:44 PM   #26
52telecaster
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If I could afford either one I would buy the cinelli.

Russell
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Old 01-01-17, 12:30 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Indexed shifting is 30+ years old at this point. 3 decades to adjust and improve.
And 9sp is over 20 years old at this point.

Basically, 9sp and indexed, which is whats on the bikes, have 20-30 years of refinement and time to get into the mainstream so repair components can be had.

As mentioned, the microshift 9sp shifters can adjust between indexed and friction. Best of both worlds so the .001% of miles ridden where indexing doesnt work, friction can be used.

I love friction and have it on a couple bikes still, but 9sp simply shouldnt be called unreliable or less reliable than 8sp. Neither should indexed shifting, especially when friction is available if needed.
I wouldn't call 9 speed unreliable (unlike old Shimano road 10 speed). I'd call 8 (and 7) speed MORE reliable.

9 speed vs 8 speed:

Narrower chain not readily available in less developed parts. While 8 speed can work with 6 to 9 speed chains, vice-versa is not possible.

More tightly spaced sprockets, making the system more sensitive to any RD misalignment, and RD pivot play, any problems with cables and housing. Also a bit harder to use in friction mode - again, tightly spaced sprockets.
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Old 01-01-17, 12:35 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Slaninar View Post
I wouldn't call 9 speed unreliable (unlike old Shimano road 10 speed). I'd call 8 (and 7) speed MORE reliable.

9 speed vs 8 speed:

Narrower chain not readily available in less developed parts. While 8 speed can work with 6 to 9 speed chains, vice-versa is not possible.

More tightly spaced sprockets, making the system more sensitive to any RD misalignment, and RD pivot play, any problems with cables and housing. Also a bit harder to use in friction mode - again, tightly spaced sprockets.
Interesting. I expect my 9sp touring bike to be trouble free with typical maintenance for at least 10000 miles. If my chain doesnt last at least a couple thousand miles, ill be annoyed...and i dont expect i will be annoyed. My 9sp bar end shifters should last well past when i want to change bikes in however many years, and i got em used to begin with.

I get that the chain is narrower. It just isnt common for 9sp chains to fail though.

The argument that 7sp is available anywhere, while perhaps true, isnt applicable to probably 90% of tourers and touring miles. How many touers go to rural Laos or wherever and find themselves stuck because they dont use a 7sp drivetrsin? Compared to the number of people who tour in Europe, North America, etc where 9sp is extremely common and often available within a day's travel or within a couple days by mail?

The number of tourers tsking their bike to 3rd world/undeveloped riding spots is extremely small within the touring community. Most ride supported tours or unsupported in developed regions.

Its just a nonissue at this point, unless you are going to undeveloped land, and even then the odds are small there would be an issue.
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Old 01-01-17, 02:16 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Interesting. I expect my 9sp touring bike to be trouble free with typical maintenance for at least 10000 miles. If my chain doesnt last at least a couple thousand miles, ill be annoyed...and i dont expect i will be annoyed. My 9sp bar end shifters should last well past when i want to change bikes in however many years, and i got em used to begin with.

I get that the chain is narrower. It just isnt common for 9sp chains to fail though.

The argument that 7sp is available anywhere, while perhaps true, isnt applicable to probably 90% of tourers and touring miles. How many touers go to rural Laos or wherever and find themselves stuck because they dont use a 7sp drivetrsin? Compared to the number of people who tour in Europe, North America, etc where 9sp is extremely common and often available within a day's travel or within a couple days by mail?

The number of tourers tsking their bike to 3rd world/undeveloped riding spots is extremely small within the touring community. Most ride supported tours or unsupported in developed regions.

Its just a nonissue at this point, unless you are going to undeveloped land, and even then the odds are small there would be an issue.

1) Never underestimate the Murphy's law.

2) Advantages of 9 over 8 speed in terms of touring are: one more gear ratio to choose in the slower end of the cassette. Top and low end being the same.

3) Disadvantage: price, parts availability and compatibility, robustness of the system (9 speed having more tightly spaced sprockets). Nothing drastic, but there is a difference. Bit harder to get it right with friction shifters, and a bit more sensitive to cable/housing friction and RD play if using index shifters.
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Old 02-08-17, 03:02 PM   #30
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Hi There again,

Must update due the fantastic advices comments from you.
After long reviews of what bike I need for my adventure, I decided to buy the Cinelli Hobo,
and finally received it and get it ready for my 3 days tour in the land to check it out and release final thought.
I got the 53 size and very happy to not choose the 56, seems to me very comport on the test drive for my dimensions.



Thank you people,

Elad

Last edited by eladh7; 02-08-17 at 03:07 PM.
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Old 02-08-17, 08:11 PM   #31
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Congratulations Eladh7 !!!

The Cinelli looks like a very nice bike and has great components.

As you begin to ride it more frequently you will begin to really notice how well it fits (hopefully!) or not.

Like others, i really like cantilever brakes and the Tubus Front/Rear racks are a very nice addition.

Please return to post again once you have some experience on your new ride (and post up photos!!!)
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Old 02-08-17, 11:24 PM   #32
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For something in between, there's the Specialized Sequoia:



According to the marketing blurb:

A 100 years ago, we didn't have road bikes and touring bikes—there were just bikes, and that didn't stop anyone from heading out into the wilderness. With this spirit, we built our groundbreaking Sequoia. It's reshaping long held ideas, and forever changing what we'll come to expect from a bike.
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Old 03-17-17, 01:03 PM   #33
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Hello again body's!

I have uploaded couple of photos from my 4 days journey that I did in my country.
I have toured roughly 7 hours per day and covered 90k'm average, so I convinced that the bike feel very good,
they are comport, handle very good with an 22kg loaded, and seem suit for my body, as I didn't felt any uncomfortable while riding.

Very happy to share with you the great scenery's of the israeli desert:




















See you

Last edited by eladh7; 03-17-17 at 01:08 PM.
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Old 03-17-17, 04:54 PM   #34
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