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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 01-11-17, 02:46 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
Exactly right. The OP's request was to keep hands warm on the bike. For that, pogies are hands down (no pun) the best solution. They work and they work very well.

Every activity in the winter is going to require some tweak to optimize keeping appendages warm. I spend a lot of time outdoors skiing in the winter in both a winter professional role (any weather down to deep subzero) and in support of alpine racing programs. I can tell you that what I do for that role is very different from what I use for cycling. Those gloves while working outdoors skiing would not work cycling (they would be too warm) and, obviously, using pogies skiing is impractical. So there is not going to be one solution that fits all applications, it's just not going to happen.

J.
Actually, OP later revealed they have Raynaud's Disease. Pogies, gloves, etc. help your hands conserve warmth; when Reynaud's strikes, your hands don't warm. The circulation in them is severely restricted. An external heat source may be the only viable option, and chemical heater packs don't warm the fingers.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:05 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by SloButWide View Post
Actually, OP later revealed they have Raynaud's Disease.
You are mistaken.

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I should clarify: I've never been diagnosed with Raynaud's.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:09 PM   #28
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You are mistaken.
Thank you. I guess my attention wandered between the posts where Raynaud's was discussed and the disclaimer.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:17 PM   #29
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OP, how cold does it get in Memphis, TN? I'm doubting there are many days below 20F like my hood. If so, then just two pair of gloves (heavy and light) should be good enough for cycling. If you also have a motorcycle, then the electric gloves may make more sense like a poster above mentioned. But I think they are over the top for cycling in your area. I get by with Perl Izumi Thermal Lite and amfib gloves.
Cold is going to be a matter of acclimation. While you and I might think of 20F as warm, someone in a warmer climate is going to see that as bitter cold.

I'm up here in Minnesota (we know cold). I have been going back and forth with a guy who moved here from Atlanta this summer about what winter would be like. He couldn't believe how "cold" 20F was the first time we had temps that cold. I told him that would feel warm when he'd been through -20F. Sure enough, -20F came and went and he couldn't believe how warm it was and even was walking around with his jacket unzipped like the rest of us. It's also why it's so funny to us Frozen Northlanders when we go spring skiing in the mountains and all the southerners show up wearing what we'd wear for subzero and the temp is around 30-40F.

J.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:21 PM   #30
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Mittens will always be warmer than fingered gloves ..
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Old 01-11-17, 03:47 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by SloButWide View Post
Actually, OP later revealed they have Raynaud's Disease. Pogies, gloves, etc. help your hands conserve warmth; when Reynaud's strikes, your hands don't warm. The circulation in them is severely restricted. An external heat source may be the only viable option, and chemical heater packs don't warm the fingers.
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You are mistaken.
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Thank you. I guess my attention wandered between the posts where Raynaud's was discussed and the disclaimer.
I apologize for the confusion. I hadn't realized that the word "Raynaud's" was part of the product name in the link I posted. That is likely what caused the misunderstanding. I will say, though, that my trouble with cold hands does seem to be on the extreme end of the spectrum among people I know, even though I am generally stoic about physical discomfort. The pain from cold (only in my hands) is pretty intense, and I can normally only warm my hands back up again by doing something like wrapping them around a hot mug of tea.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:49 PM   #32
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Cold is going to be a matter of acclimation. While you and I might think of 20F as warm, someone in a warmer climate is going to see that as bitter cold.

I'm up here in Minnesota (we know cold). I have been going back and forth with a guy who moved here from Atlanta this summer about what winter would be like. He couldn't believe how "cold" 20F was the first time we had temps that cold. I told him that would feel warm when he'd been through -20F. Sure enough, -20F came and went and he couldn't believe how warm it was and even was walking around with his jacket unzipped like the rest of us. It's also why it's so funny to us Frozen Northlanders when we go spring skiing in the mountains and all the southerners show up wearing what we'd wear for subzero and the temp is around 30-40F.

J.
I know what you mean! I used to live in Michigan, and what I think of as "cold" in Memphis is what I thought of as "early spring" back then. I tolerated the cold in Michigan really well and enjoyed outdoor activities even in the most frozen of months, but even then, I always had trouble with my hands being painfully cold.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:53 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
$150 can buy a hell of a lot of chemical glove-warmers

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Hot-Hands...-10pk/17808715

Also, you can buy reusable warmers that are filled with a special solution so that you can boil the pouch to cause a chemical reaction that stores potential heat energy, and then "click" an activator inside the pack and that starts a reaction that slowly releases heat back out.

There seem to be many companies that make these, all with "click" in their name:

https://www.google.com/search?q=reus...ing+pack+click
Good idea. I'll look into them.

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This is really the answer.

I get cold hands easily after having repetitively frostbitten my hands over the years. Yet, with pogies I can ride even at cold temps (i.e. near zero fahrenheit) with a light glove and have hands that are very warm.

J.
Really interesting! I've seen Bar Mitts mentioned before but never really followed up on them. I'm going to check around to see if I can find some that will work with my moustache bars.
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Old 01-11-17, 03:54 PM   #34
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I know what you mean! I used to live in Michigan, and what I think of as "cold" in Memphis is what I thought of as "early spring" back then. I tolerated the cold in Michigan really well and enjoyed outdoor activities even in the most frozen of months, but even then, I always had trouble with my hands being painfully cold.
I too have problems keeping my hands warm - I've frostbitten them multiple times - so I'm pretty focused on schemes to keep my hands warm. But I think that too, even with the added sensitivity, has a large element of acclimation to it. For example, in the first cold of the year, I'll usually wind up with my heavy mittens on. Later in the year when I've been through some deep subzero, those same mittens would wind up wet from sweat at the same temperature I felt cold in at the beginning of the season.

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Old 01-11-17, 04:35 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
Semantic games you play.

You want to keep your hands warm on a bike you do pogies. You want to keep your hands warm skiing, get high grade mittens and use heater packs. You want to keep your hands warm cross country skiing, you do something different. There is no one solution that is optimal for all of these applications. The request was for keeping hands warm on a bike.

So to be explicit, I wouldn't spend $150 to keep my hands warm on a bike. I also am about 90% sure that they wouldn't work for me. Either they are inadequate in the wind proofing (the problem with the vast majority of gloves) and/or I would be warm until my hands sweated from exertion and then they would be cold. So, my answer to all questions by the OP is "no, these would not be a great choice. There are much better choices for a lot less money to keep your hands warm on the bike. For the bike, look at Pogies first."

FWIW, I bought one pair for $35 (bar mitts) on sale on Amazon. I bought another pair for $45 not on sale at the time. You can get them pretty inexpensively if you shop around. Here's a pair that look decent for $19.

I'm glad you enjoy your gloves.

J.

The Semantic games I play? I played no games, you however...
If you want to keep your hands warm with poagies go ahead I hope they do you well. I'll try to stay on topic and answer the OP question without trying to force some other option upon them.
You want to buy many different gloves for different situations go for it the economy depends on you. I will pay more for one good set that that will do a very decent job of many different situations.

"I'm glad you enjoy your gloves." Talk about semantic games. I use electric "liners" not electric gloves- there is a difference, a big difference. I do use and stated I use a water and wind resistance medium weight Pearl Izumi over the heated liners, not heated gloves.
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Old 01-11-17, 08:07 PM   #36
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I am glad you enjoy your gloves (liners are still gloves).

You're missing my point - I don't ski in bike gloves and vice versa.

What temp is your set up good to? How low will it go?

J.
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Old 01-12-17, 03:15 PM   #37
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I wore an electric vest and sometimes used electric (Gerbings) gloves when I had my last motorcycle, and they recommended you have enough power generation on the bike to get the most out of their products. Granted that was years ago, but I wonder what kind of runtimes you'd get with these. They might be a great idea at first, but only until the battery runs down.

And with Raynaud's, the feet are usually effected before the hands.
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Old 01-16-17, 01:59 AM   #38
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Also, you can buy reusable warmers that are filled with a special solution so that you can boil the pouch to cause a chemical reaction that stores potential heat energy, and then "click" an activator inside the pack and that starts a reaction that slowly releases heat back out.
While they work - technically - I've never found them particularly useful for outdoors activities. They carry a rather limited amount of heat, both in time and temperature. I've tried using them for tour skating, and more often than not found them already activated and spent when I wanted to use them.
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