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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 02-12-17, 10:52 AM   #26
Stadjer
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
The "correct" high quality nuts for S-A IGH axles (presumably the wheel in question on your Gazelle bike) will always strip the threads off the nut, rather than the axle when over torqued or cross threaded on to an S-A axle, they are designed and manufactured that way.

The point remains - your anecdote of youthful blunder in hardware selection proves nothing about bicycle quality.
It had a 5 speed derailleur actually, and anecdotes tend not to prove much anyway. But steel isn't just steel, some stainless steel is more rustproof than other, some nuts will get round very easily. That will rather annoy a competent at home mechanic than be compensated by one.
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Old 02-12-17, 10:56 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
The "correct" high quality nuts for S-A IGH axles (presumably the wheel in question on your Gazelle bike) will always strip the threads off the nut, rather than the axle when over torqued or cross threaded on to an S-A axle, they are designed and manufactured that way.

The point remains - your anecdote of youthful blunder in hardware selection proves nothing about bicycle quality.
Right, his story may not be the best one to illustrate the fact that good quality fasteners and odds and ends make a difference in the overall experience, but it's true, anyway.
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Old 03-12-17, 08:41 PM   #28
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Curious what the OP went with. I had been looking at similar bikes and considering a three speed...
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Old 03-13-17, 09:09 AM   #29
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A 3 speed IGH is the simplest bike there is and buying one won't break the bank...
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Old 03-13-17, 10:54 AM   #30
noglider 
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A 3 speed IGH is the simplest bike there is and buying one won't break the bank...
Single speed freewheel and single speed fixed are simpler than that, and they are popular in NYC. But yes, 3-speeds tend to be maintenance free.
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Old 03-17-17, 09:00 PM   #31
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Your lack of paying attention and using the wrong sized nut was the cause of your problem, not the alleged quality of the bicycle that was the source of the nut. A wrong sized, high quality nut taken from the highest quality bicycle would have produced the same result.
Indeed, if the Gazelle had a Sturmey Archer hub, then it's worth noting that the axle was threaded according to the obscure Whitworth standard, whereas the kids bike may have had a SAE standard nut. Those threads look similar, at first glance, but are incompatible.

Admittedly, I made the same mistake long ago, with similar experience: Thankfully, the nice hard steel of the S-A axle survived, and the nut was a loss. I continue to marvel at the ingenuity of those old world engineers.
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Old 03-21-17, 08:11 AM   #32
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I ride an 8 speed IGH Linus every day and have put a little over 2,000 miles on it. I don't know if I got a lemon or not but I'm currently having the hub/wheel replaced because it died on me.

2,000 miles seems like not a lot to have killed a gearing system. Other than that, and the fact that it's heavy, it's been a solid bike.

I don't ride it in any kind of yucky weather, so I can't speak to Chicago winters but - it's worked for me so far.
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