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Old 04-08-17, 10:22 AM   #1
DanBF
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What municipal bike racks should we get for our downtown

I live in a small town of about 4,500 people and a small group of us are trying to encourage more bicycle use along our main street. There are no grassy areas so we are looking at surface mount bicycle racks that you attach to concrete. We are looking at inexpensive racks that can handle one or two bikes at a time. The black one shown below looks good but only has one attachment point so it is easier to install but may be more fragile. The U shaped one looks more generic but is stronger. The U shaped one is $108 and the other one costs $64. I'd like to hear from you which one would be preferable from a user standpoint. Thanks!
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Old 04-08-17, 11:02 AM   #2
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Do you have any pictures of your main street area. What is the architecture like?

MTA: I prefer the U shaped one of the two
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Old 04-08-17, 12:04 PM   #3
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I prefer the U shape as well.
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Old 04-08-17, 12:39 PM   #4
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Here's a pic of main street:
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Old 04-08-17, 01:41 PM   #5
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I'd get the U shaped as well.
Its too bad something like that couldn't be made in a local shop. would be cheap to produce.

Local town Center has these

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Old 04-08-17, 01:56 PM   #6
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U shape.
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Old 04-08-17, 05:19 PM   #7
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Another vote for U.

Of this type the best design I've seen is:



All kinds of bikes lean against these very well and locking up is easier than smaller U's. Might be quite a bit more expensive though unless a local shop wants to donate some bending and welding time.

When you place them think about being able to add more adjacent to the first so that you create a bit of a distinct parking place.
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Old 04-08-17, 07:22 PM   #8
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https://www.sarisparking.com/?utm_ca...F7JRoCbCPw_wcB
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Old 04-09-17, 04:47 AM   #9
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I like the U-shape better. It's visually less intrusive, it could be used for 4 bikes if necessary and it looks more like something people could use to park a bike than that is shouts 'this is a bike rack and you should use it in this particular way'.
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Old 04-09-17, 05:06 AM   #10
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U shape hands down. Just be careful what you attach the stand to:

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Old 04-09-17, 06:40 AM   #11
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Bike racks in Austin, intended to represent local culture:









Bike rack designs for NYC:
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Old 04-09-17, 06:48 AM   #12
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That looks almost identical to where I live. Our city put in U shaped ones and I prefer them.
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Old 04-09-17, 07:13 AM   #13
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Only one (secure, well done) ground attachment point can make a huge difference in installation cost, which can be the major driver in how many get implemented.

The loop is too high on the black rack shown in the OP.

For implemented cost + functionality, it's hard to beat the standard ring-and-post.

ring-and-post.jpg

The ring+post rack is available in versions that can be added to existing city signs and those parking meters I see in the photo of the subject town. This could really cut final installated cost. Several manufacturers/suppliers offer these.

ring-post add-on.jpg

My favorite remains the Y-rack.

y-rack.jpg

Last edited by tcs; 04-09-17 at 07:42 AM.
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Old 04-09-17, 07:13 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanBF View Post
Here's a pic of main street:
As Bob Newhart said, seen one small Pennsylvania town, seen em all.

Our town has a couple of different types including the U shaped one you showed. It works fine, but the single attachment one looks like it would be a more stable leaning post for a bike without a kickstand.
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Old 04-09-17, 09:19 AM   #15
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Either of those two options should work fine, but the cheaper product and installation cost of the black one I guess would make that the winner, if those are the only two options.

I like the idea above however, of trying to find a way to design and build locally. Hold a town-wide design competition, and in a small rural town there should be at least a couple guys with the skill and equipment to work metal. Attractive bike racks could become a source of local pride, and get more town-wide buy-in, and maybe inspire more bike-riding!

FWIW, in my area there are a bunch of bicycle-shaped racks, which I like. They are similar to these:
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Old 04-09-17, 10:45 AM   #16
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More important than the shape of the rack is where will the rack be installed.

I frequently see bike racks that are shoved up against buildings to reduce their footprint. Unfortunately this makes them less usable because it eliminates may of the potential angles of approach to the bike rack. Every bicycle has different geometry. Every bike lock has different geometry.

Make sure there is lots of unobstructed space around the rack to maneuver bicycles and lock them up.

BAD PLACEMENT:





GOOD PLACEMENT:
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Old 04-09-17, 11:07 AM   #17
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I like the U shape racks, and spread out over the whole area rather than grouped together in one location.
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Old 04-09-17, 11:58 AM   #18
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Is there a Starbucks or a McDonalds in town? Those corporations have approved bike rack designs that they will put in front of their stores, and they might even put in extras around town for minimal/no charge. Starbucks has a steaming coffee cup design, McDonalds has some traditional bicycle-looking sculptures they like to use.

You could also see if there's a metal working shop in town that would make them for you (something like the 'U'-shaped ones in your picture). Lots of times you supply the materials and they'll 'process' them (tube bending, cutting, welding, etc). They may even be able to get them powdercoated, too.
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Old 04-09-17, 03:37 PM   #19
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I'm on the city bike commision and we recommende the U shaped ones.
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Old 04-09-17, 06:40 PM   #20
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The U is ok, but I think a bike "hitch" is more effective for a broader range of bike shapes and sizes. The classic post and ring is most common of this style, eg Dero Bike hitch.
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Old 04-09-17, 08:47 PM   #21
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https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3082/...a3faffbbba.jpg

I'm all for the U shape myself. There are all sorts of bike racks in Portland but the defacto rack would be the one in the picture.
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Old 04-10-17, 10:00 AM   #22
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Wave bike racks can hold lots of bikes in a small space.

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Old 04-10-17, 10:43 AM   #23
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For a small town, I'd also vote for some kind of unique and artistic racks. They might get buried in a big city, but stand out in small cities.

I'm sure they are for sale somewhere, or you could have a local artist/machine shop build some.

Here is a thread with some unique racks.
http://www.bikeforums.net/living-car...e-parking.html

These were up in Portland.


It might be hard to get anything to fancy on a low budget, but perhaps you could get a local fabricator to donate some time, especially if they can sign their work.
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Old 04-10-17, 11:04 AM   #24
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I'm a little late to the party but I like the black loop with the single stand over the U. If a person were to loosen the bolts of one leg of the U they could possibly slide the bike's lock or chain off the rack and carry the bike off. With the black loop, they would have to carry the bike and the rack. It's not inconceivable that some wonewould carry both opff, but probably less likely.
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Old 04-10-17, 11:09 AM   #25
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My vote for your town is U racks. We have 'arsty' racks here in the Lou and some are visually striking but not very practical.
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