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  1. #1
    Part-time Commuter astr033's Avatar
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    Bicycle fitting for a commuter hybrid bike?

    I recently got into bicycling to commute to work 2-3 times a week. I may start increasing my time on the bike as I get more and more used to it. Quite possibly I may get a trainer for the wintertime to improve my conditioning (right now I'm wicked outta shape). I hear and read things about bicycle fitting, and I'm wondering if it's worth the money. The LBS (Wheel Works - http://www.wheelworks.com/fitting.htm) has a basic fitting for $50. Seeing as I won't be racing anytime soon and that I go pretty easy on my commute (anywhere from 11-14mph depending on the slope) I'm thinking of not spending the money. But if it saves me a potential knee problem then it certainly is worth the money. It would help if I knew if bicycle fittings are common for commuters or if it's more for racers. What do you commuters think about getting fitted?

    --
    In the event that it matters:
    Me: 6' 0.5", 187 lbs.
    My bike: 22.5" Gary Fisher Nirvana (a hybrid)

  2. #2
    Banned. FXjohn's Avatar
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    Yes, get fitted.
    My knee problems are almost gone since I got fitted to my 7700 FX upright bar hybrid.

  3. #3
    Part-time Commuter astr033's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FXjohn
    Yes, get fitted.
    My knee problems are almost gone since I got fitted to my 7700 FX upright bar hybrid.
    Did they make many adjustments? I have a fear of dropping $50, going there and having them spend 5 minutes to move the seat 1 mm. It would make me feel tons better if I knew they were going through a thorough process and moving everything about. Yeah, I'm neurotic, I know.

  4. #4
    Banned. FXjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by astr033
    Did they make many adjustments? I have a fear of dropping $50, going there and having them spend 5 minutes to move the seat 1 mm. It would make me feel tons better if I knew they were going through a thorough process and moving everything about. Yeah, I'm neurotic, I know.

    It ook at least 2 hours.

    I ended up getting a new stem, handlebars shortened for shoulder width.
    Lemond shoe wedges.
    Now whn I'm on my bike I "Float".


    Bear in mond not all fitters are equal.
    This was at BGI in Indianapolis.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    I did my own fitting over a period of years. If you have an easy commute then you are not going to hurt yourself with an almost-fitting bike. It is another story if you are doing lots of fast endurance riding with clipless pedals.

    For some advice on the whats and whys of fit for non-racing applications, check out
    www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

  6. #6
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    The thing is, you can't rely on professional fittings anyway. You can only rely on getting saddle height, saddle fore-and-aft and handlebar height/reach in the ballpark (by that, I mean a reasonably standard position), and then tweaking it yourself. There are lots of website resources that can help you adjust your bike "in the ballpark" yourself. It's just a matter of following the instructions. All you need to have is a set of allan keys, a plumb bob, and a tape measure. It's not rocket science, unless you're a pro racer who needs to get every last drop of performance in order to win the Tour de France. It's even less rocket science if you ride a hybrid, not that hybrids aren't great bikes, but they have a lot more adjustment leeway than a more nervous road bike does. I would say save your money and instead use it to buy a good cycling book.

  7. #7
    No one carries the DogBoy
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    If you are comfortable on the bike and aren't having any strange pains, don't waste the money. If you have a recurring comfort problem on the bike that you can't figure out, then spend the cash. Also, get recommendations from people before you get fit. As was stated, not all fitters are equal.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    I'll second Dogboy and others on here. Since it sounds like your commute is a fairly easy one and you're not pushing hard I would do it yourself as you settle into riding. I have been riding a hybrid for the past 6 months and have found that I have had to adjust my bike two or three times as my riding has changed. If you start to have real problems with knee pain or other issues then you can spend the money.
    God grant me the serenity to accept the hills and winds I cannot change;
    courage to challenge the cagers I can; and wisdom to know the difference.
    (with apologies to AA)
    24 mi. roundtrip -- Maryland suburbs to DC and back.

  9. #9
    It's full of stars... atombob's Avatar
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    I just picked up a hybrid as well since my single speed was stolen. I'm having a little trouble getting used to the heads up position of the one that I have. Is it me or is the complete geometry of this bike more relaxed?

    I'm not sure how it should "feel" but nothing hurts so far. lol.
    1980's KHS fixed l 1999 Trek OCLV mt bike l 2003 Canondale R3000
    This is your life, and it's ending one minute at a time.
    My Bike Commuter Blog I My Photo Blog

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