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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 06-03-06, 08:11 AM   #1
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Does anyone commute on a Tri- bike ?

Im reading stuff on Tri bikes and basicly come to the conclusion
that tri-bikes are set up so the bionic rider can be comfortable
while hammering enuff so that getting off and running 12 miles is
no big deal
No wrist ache...Emphisis on easy breathing etc...........

This sounds like a great commuter set-up for those who have
long distances inbetween locations and then have to stand all
day at thier jobs. Hmmmmmm...............
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Old 06-03-06, 12:04 PM   #2
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Aerobars in traffic? I'd like to see pics of that!
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Old 06-03-06, 12:14 PM   #3
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I use a Bacchetta Corsa to commute on. Faster and more comfortable than a Tri bike, I have a 20 mile 1 way commute I do at least 3 times a week. It makes an excellent commuter bike with the "brain bag" on the back of the seat to carry my stuff. I went with the Corsa because I'm a speed junkie, but if I had to carry lots of stuff I'd do a strada or a Giro 26 with disc brakes and a rack. As it is with the Corsa I'm averaging 18.5/19mph for the commute, and there's a big hill that I have to climb either way. On the flats I'm around 25mph give or take 1-2mph depending on conditions. If you want to go fast and be comfortable, this is definately the way to do it.

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Old 06-03-06, 12:35 PM   #4
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If you commute on roads that are fairly flat and straight for long distances with minimal traffic to navigate through, I suppose it could work out fairly well. Riding in that position everyday may bother some peoples backs after a awhile, but I suppose for some it would be ok.

I use my road old bike for commuting, with my bars about 3" below the saddle, and that is plenty for me. I can't imagine using a Tri/TT setup with an aggressive posture everyday like that, but if it works for you, then knock yourself out.

One question...

How are you going to mount a rack & panniers on this baby? I don't even think P-clips would work.

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Old 06-03-06, 01:22 PM   #5
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Thanks for responses !
I know nothing about them but the stuff Ive read says
Short top tube and different seat angle which seem very
appealing to me. Road bikes today all seem to have geometry
that makes me stretch out too far over the bike and I need to
buy a smaller frame than I should just to get the right top tube.
The stuff Ive read says comfort on tri's is paramount because the rider
must be somewhat relaxed when the bike part is over. That seems
appealing to me. My commute is short (12.3) but I never have to stop
even once on the Am ride in. Arriving at my crappo manual labor job relaxed
is more of a priority than anything else right now.
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Old 06-03-06, 01:50 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patriot
How are you going to mount a rack & panniers on this baby? I don't even think P-clips would work.
Use one of those seat post mounted racks?
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Old 06-03-06, 02:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newbojeff
Aerobars in traffic? I'd like to see pics of that!
That could be a problem. I have aerobars on my bike and I ride on a bike bath and still have a hard time using them because of all of the dog walkers, joggers, and little kids. The disadvantage of course is that they make it hard to see very far ahead to avoid obstacles.
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Old 06-03-06, 03:17 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robmcl
That could be a problem. I have aerobars on my bike and I ride on a bike bath and still have a hard time using them because of all of the dog walkers, joggers, and little kids. The disadvantage of course is that they make it hard to see very far ahead to avoid obstacles.
Got any pics of you in the aerobars hammering down N Lincoln Ave?
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Old 06-04-06, 08:23 AM   #9
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I commute in the western suburbs on the Praire Path. I am not a central city commuter.
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Old 06-04-06, 08:33 AM   #10
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You dont have to get a dedicated tri bike in order to commute tri style. My commuter was my old tri bike, and it was a converted old ralleigh road bike.

I dont know if they sell them any more. But Profile Design sells a seat post which converts your road bike seat position into a more triathlon effective position.

http://froogle.google.com/froogle?q=...oogle&ct=title

Slap on some aerobars and youre set. I wouldnt recomend it in heavy traffic. But its great when you have a strech of flatland, and you have the need for speed or when trying to cut thru a headwind.

But there is also the question of why do you want to commute on a Tri bike. Granted there are tri bikes designed for each triathlon distance. The typical Tri bikes are designed to keep the rider in the most efficent cycling position so that you can complete the run after your bike (usually a distance between 12 - 24 miles), because you are in the Aero position most of the time (you cant draft in Triathlon). If you ad aero bars to a standard road bike, you are actually streching your body out more, making it slightly harder to breathe. This is why the top tube is shorter on a triathlon bike. The seat post I liked to above effectivley shortens the top tube. But Ironman (Swim 2ish, Bike 100+, Run 26.2) are more like a standard road bike, because you are essentially completleting a centruy ride.

Here is a nice article on Triathlon vs. Road Bike geometry:

http://www.bikesportmichigan.com/bikes/difference.shtml

Last edited by Jet Powered; 06-04-06 at 08:53 AM.
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Old 06-04-06, 09:25 AM   #11
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I saw someone with a regular road bike with aerobars the other day. He wasn't using the aero bars though.
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Old 06-04-06, 07:51 PM   #12
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Interesting, that's the type of bike I want next. Yes you can set the seat forward on a road bike to get some of a tri feel, but you'll have more weight on the handlebars the a real tri geometry bike. Don't know if I will be able to get it yet as job situation is fluid now, but hopefully all will work out good. I was on one a bit, and it sure seems more confortable than another bike. Only disadvantage is it would be trickier to see if in heavy congested traffic. Still better than a bent, and unless you go with a lowracer type of bent you have about the same aero benefits. My commute is not bad, so I'm thinking of the unthinkable: both a tri bike and deep wheels [50 to 60mm], fall back here is an alps. With the wheels, I plan on going cyclesdale just to get more durability out of them.

Let us know how you evaluate this. Go test ride some tri bikes: QR, felt. or next years trek TTT.
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Old 06-05-06, 04:21 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patriot

One question...

How are you going to mount a rack & panniers on this baby? I don't even think P-clips would work.
Dont commute one one but have seen people here commuting on full out road race bikes and some tri bikes on a fairly regular basis. Without exception, these commuters are in full bike "race" gear and use very tight streamlined knapsacks for their stuff. They are also rural commuters (might be some doing purely in city commutes like this, but I have not seen them since I am a rural commuter as well). I figure that they are working in a training ride into their commute. Multi tasking takes on another meaning ;p
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Old 06-05-06, 06:27 AM   #14
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Oh, forgot to mention. Carry gear-- seat post rack, topeak makes a nice one. My dream is a modified tri, I'ld still put on fenders. In the Seattle area, tri bikers regularly train with fenders on and take them off just for the races.
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Old 06-05-06, 12:54 PM   #15
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I commute (mostly rural route) regularly on my tri bike, but I don't normally carry anything. I haven't thought about getting one of those seat post racks, though..I might have to try that.

"Comfort" is relative, where a tri bike is concerned. The primary consideration is (or should be) getting aero, with enough comfort where you can hold that position for the length of your race. I can't say that riding the tri bike is "comfortable" in the context of noodling along at 12 mph with a comfortable seat, in traffic. That's not what it's designed for.

I commute one-way most days, and try to incorporate my weekly training into the commutes, so I ride intervals some days, time trial home on the tri bike some days..it all adds up!
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Old 06-05-06, 01:03 PM   #16
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Tri bikes are just as comfortable (or uncomfortable) as road time trial bikes, but have shorter top tubes and larger seat tube angles because triathelets are usually runners first and have massive quads but the rest of their cycling muscles are underdeveloped. A slack seat tube (like a road bike) lessens the load on the quads and forces the glutes to do more work.

Don't be fooled. A tri bike has aerodynamics as its main focus, not comfort commuter type comfort.
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