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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 06-23-06, 10:07 AM   #1
BikeLite
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The Seat by Ergo

Has anybody used this seat and can you recommend it? I am considering it.

www.thecomfortseat.com

http://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/8733.html
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Old 06-23-06, 10:16 AM   #2
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Never tried it or even seen one on a bike. The concept looks good though. The saddle looks weird but if it works, then it's well worth it.
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Old 06-23-06, 11:17 AM   #3
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We put that seat on a semi-recumbent, with success. There are several models, and we got the firmest seat for long rides. I can't imagine being able to use this seat on an upright, because you need a nose to help with steering.

What are you hoping to accomplish, comfort? There are better options.
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Old 06-23-06, 11:31 AM   #4
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Comfort yes. What are other options? Thanks for the feedback.
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Old 06-24-06, 08:28 PM   #5
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It depends on what you're trying to accomplish. If you want to go on long rides you need a firm seat, if you want to go on short rides, a soft/gel seat will seem most comfortable. Short rides are 3 miles, long rides are over 30 miles. Firm seats are Brooks leather saddles. I haven't tried them. I ride around the 30 mile range and have a Specialized Body Geometry saddle. More info needed...
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Old 06-24-06, 08:39 PM   #6
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Looks like for hybrid and recumbent only. Wonder if it eliminates the need for padded bike shorts
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Old 06-24-06, 08:41 PM   #7
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Tried it. Couldn't stand it. It may work for a hybrid or comfort bike. One where you are riding with a very upright posture. But for a road bike the nose on a seat is there for added stability. By pressing your legs on one side of the seat or the other you gain additional ability to steer the bike with something other than your hands.
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Old 06-25-06, 04:02 AM   #8
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Noseless saddles don't really work. You can't ride no handed on them, and you aren't exactly stable when gripping the bars, either. Just get a saddle with a centre groove, a gel insert or a cutout if you're worried about the boys.
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Old 06-25-06, 07:17 AM   #9
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I have this on my commuter. It's my second one. Very comfortable.
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Old 06-25-06, 08:17 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redrom
If you want to go on long rides you need a firm seat, if you want to go on short rides, a soft/gel seat will seem most comfortable. Short rides are 3 miles, long rides are over 30 miles.
I disagree, I advocate firm saddles at all times and in all situations. I do agree, though, that Brooks, Specialized Body Geometry, and Terrys are all good saddles.
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Old 06-25-06, 10:41 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redrom
I can't imagine being able to use this seat on an upright, because you need a nose to help with steering.
Is that all a nose helps with? its essential?
Would inserting a seatpost backwards give you a good indication of riding without a seat nose would be like?
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Old 06-25-06, 10:44 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by godspiral
Is that all a nose helps with? its essential?
Would inserting a seatpost backwards give you a good indication of riding without a seat nose would be like?
Haha, that sounds like a few minutes of amusement. I might try it this afternoon, but please report back your experience.
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Old 06-30-06, 11:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTcommuter
I disagree, I advocate firm saddles at all times and in all situations. I do agree, though, that Brooks, Specialized Body Geometry, and Terrys are all good saddles.
OK, you're right, I could have worded that better. Gel seats won't annoy the hell out of you as long as you keep your rides to as short a length as possible (3 miles or less).

No, wait I'll try again. Gel seats suck, but you won't realize why until you're riding more than 3 miles.

Now this is just getting fun... A gel seat on your bike just shows that you live more than 3 miles from a bike store.

Man, I know the perfect one is out there... any help?
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Old 06-30-06, 12:46 PM   #14
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Saddle Horn from Our 'Westerns' Heritage?
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Old 06-30-06, 01:15 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redrom
you need a nose to help with steering.
No you don't. You don't even need a seat. They work fine on uprights.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LóFarkas
Noseless saddles don't really work. You can't ride no handed on them, and you aren't exactly stable when gripping the bars, either.
Yes you can, it just feels that way at first, you can get used to it. I can ride no handed with no seat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vrkelley
Looks like for hybrid and recumbent only. Wonder if it eliminates the need for padded bike shorts
I know 5 or 6 ladies that use a simlar saddle on uprights. One of them has two on different bikes. They eliminated the need for shorts for them. The problem area is not touching anything.

The Easy seat is used around here for people with lots of seat problems, mostly ladies. All on upright bikes.
Google "Easy Seat" the pads on the Easy Seats tip up and down with your legs.
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Old 06-30-06, 02:35 PM   #16
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I've never tried a noseless seat, even though it looks rather skethcy to me, but I'm sure one could get used to one if necessary. Nonetheless, even though I'm not really a trendy sorta guy, they just look way too goofy for me and I'll stay away from them for that reason alone.
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Old 06-30-06, 03:10 PM   #17
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Regarding looks... There is no cooler loooking saddle then the "easy seat". I just can't imagine it working better than a traditional 'cept for short, slow rides under sensitive people. Which is what the situation of the "ladies" may well be.
Actually, a messenger rode one. Less padding than the one pictured here. The bike won a "show us your ugly crap bike you messenger on, we'll give you a shiny new one" contest.
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Old 06-30-06, 03:45 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BikeLite
Has anybody used this seat and can you recommend it? I am considering it.

www.thecomfortseat.com

http://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/8733.html
I bet you a dollar it's not as comfortable as a broken in brooks...
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Old 06-30-06, 05:03 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LóFarkas
Regarding looks... There is no cooler loooking saddle then the "easy seat". I just can't imagine it working better than a traditional 'cept for short, slow rides under sensitive people. Which is what the situation of the "ladies" may well be.
Actually, a messenger rode one. Less padding than the one pictured here. The bike won a "show us your ugly crap bike you messenger on, we'll give you a shiny new one" contest.
I could have entered that contest.

They feel terrible at first, it feels like you are falling forward. It takes time. The woman who has two seats does centuries on hers. I have seen it with my own eyes. If one likes them they are great on long rides.

Ready for this..................are you sitting down?...She has one on her Litespeed. I know a guy who loves his but can't bear to see it on his best bike, so he does not use it on both bikes.

They look funny! They are heavy. It's love em or hate em.
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Old 07-01-06, 08:39 PM   #20
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I have one of the Ergo seats on my old British 3 speed. It's the firm one. It forces you to sit properly -- on your sits bones. If you sit like this on a seat with a nose, you won't have a problem. However, people with a weaker back/abdomen will have a tendency to roll their pelvis forward when they get tired, causing pressure in the wrong places. In a seat without a nose you simply don't have the option of supporting your weight in places that you shouldn't.

It took me a while to get used to the seat. I tried different heights and tilts and was pretty patient until I found the best position. Maybe this took a couple of weeks. I don't know how you could judge the seat with less than a dozen hours of experience. It's different, you'll have to make adjustments. As for looks, I don't care; but I really don't think it's ugly, certainly not compared to a lot of biking gear and clothes out there.

I have another bike with a standard seat. However, since getting the Ergo seat for the 3 speed, I'm more conscious of how I'm sitting and don't let myself get into bad habits. So there has been a happy spillover. For some people, then, it could be sort of training thing, a temporary form modification intervention.

There are some interesting split seats and other designs that have the same goal. There are some threads on them -- Spiderflex, Spongy Wonder, ISM, etc. I have no experience with them, though. Check out the threads.
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Old 07-03-06, 04:05 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aadhils
I bet you a dollar it's not as comfortable as a broken in brooks...
Nashbar is selling 'pre-softened' brooks saddles, any idea how those would break in?

I tried riding one of those 'the seat' seats on another bike, was totally brutal on my arms (bend over to drop bars, basically all my weight on my arms). Two friends do love it, but they use it in a truly bolt upright seated posture.
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Old 07-03-06, 05:47 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by HardyWeinberg
Nashbar is selling 'pre-softened' brooks saddles, any idea how those would break in?

I tried riding one of those 'the seat' seats on another bike, was totally brutal on my arms (bend over to drop bars, basically all my weight on my arms). Two friends do love it, but they use it in a truly bolt upright seated posture.

Much as I like Nashbar and the cleverness of the good folks at Brooks, you are sitting on the ideal device for breaking in a Brooks saddle. Unless the looks of the distressed saddle are important, using your sit bones for the break-in is the better way to go. I like Brooks saddles a lot and have several, but I won't go so far as saying they are the best thing bar none. But they are very good.

I suggest you give the saddle a little nose-down attitude if you don't like the horn too high. A good seatpost is almost as important in getting a comfortable fit. The beauty of a Brooks is that once broken in it feels almost like nothing, no pressure spots, no after-ride soreness. And it stays that way. You will never get that in a gel saddle.
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Old 07-03-06, 08:17 PM   #23
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PRe aged brooks is different from pre-softened. I have a pre-softened team pro S because that was the only type they had in stock in black. I cannot really tell the difference in it and the B17 regular and my champion flyer S(I mean except for the regular differences in the three saddles)
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