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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 04-22-07, 12:39 AM   #1
Elusor
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Front Fork - rigid Fork Steel

Any suggests for a front rigid fork made of steel or some other strong material?

I would also like to put some disc brakes in too.

thanks a bunch!
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Old 04-22-07, 12:41 AM   #2
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also is steel better or chromoly? what is the best material aside from these?
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Old 04-22-07, 01:03 AM   #3
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Surly Instigator fork. Cheap, massive. Has disc brake mounts as well as regular brake mounts.

It's suspension corrected though, so it's about 3-4 inches longer than a fork would have to be, unless your frame was designed for a suspension fork.
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Old 04-22-07, 01:03 AM   #4
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Chromoly is a type of steel. Surly or Soma make decent forks.

Here is a list of forks which might suit your needs. http://aebike.com//page.cfm?PageID=3...ory=605&type=T
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Old 04-22-07, 01:09 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elusor
also is steel better or chromoly? what is the best material aside from these?
Chromoly is a type of steel. Only the very cheapest steel bikes are made of non-chromoly steel. If you buy a steel rigid fork with disc brake tabs, I doubt if you can find one that isnīt chromoly.
There are many to choose from. Surly, Dimension, Nashbar, and Salsa to name a few.
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Old 04-22-07, 01:10 AM   #6
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http://www.surlybikes.com/forks.html
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Old 04-22-07, 09:04 AM   #7
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What type of bike is it? Universal Cycles has pretty huge selection. There are a lot options for you depending on the bike:

http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...hp?category=85
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Old 04-23-07, 11:31 AM   #8
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Kona also maker a decent chromoly steel fork available with disc tabs.
http://www.konaworld.com/tech/components.htm
The best steel for forks is chromoly steel that has a butted profile.
Look for one with threaded eyelets at the bottom to accept proper fenders.

You have to get the correct size and style for your bike.
If you have a threadless headset then you will have to get the fork cut to size. Better to leave it longer than needed and use spacers than accidentally cut it too short and have your handlebars too low.
It is possible to make expensive mistakes fitting forks ; it may be better tell a decent bike shop what you want and let them accept all the risk.
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Old 04-23-07, 12:03 PM   #9
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I've got Kona's Project 2 Disc fork on my commuter and sometimes trail bike. Great fork for the price.
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Old 04-23-07, 02:16 PM   #10
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My Kona Jake has a P2 (700c, non-disc) that I like a lot.
My beater MTB has a no-name steel rigid fork from nycbikes.com- heavy but dirt cheap at $19. Can't remember if they have disc tabbed ones. Also Dimension/Tange have cheap forks, look on any site that has the QBP catalog (aebike, triathlete.com, etc.)
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