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Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

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Old 09-08-07, 01:09 PM   #1
SSP
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Pedals for Commuter/Errand Bike

I'm building a Surly LHT up for commuting to work on Mondays and Fridays (hauling clothing and food...I'll ride the Madone Tuesday through Thursday).

On my road bikes, I've ridden Shimano clipless for years, but want something a bit more pedestrian-friendly on this bike.

So, I'm looking into various "clipless+platform" combinations.

Jenson USA has a pretty good deal on this shoe/pedal combo:



Only $110 for walkable shoes, and a pedal that can be used clipped in or with just the platform.

Any comments/recommendations?
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Old 09-08-07, 01:20 PM   #2
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Whatever you do, don't go for LOOK compatible shoes - the cleats are prominent and are definitely not going to make for a walkable shoe.
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Old 09-08-07, 01:54 PM   #3
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I have regular old platform pedals (no clipless, no straps, no nothing) on my LHT, which I customized for the exact purpose that you'll be using yours for. My commute is 22 miles each way, although I only do it about once a week, and I sometimes take the bus part way on the way home.

Don't get me wrong -- I prefer clipless on my other bikes. But the platforms are actually pretty convenient for biking around town and running into stores, etc.
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Old 09-08-07, 02:09 PM   #4
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I have a set of these on my mountain bike. Nashbar Highlander pedal. As a platform they are great, fantastic grip, wouldn't want to ride them barefoot. On the clipless side they don't have much float, though they are easy to get in and out of the clip. Feel smooth, rock solid, wouldn't want to be clipped in more than 20 miles at at time, couldn't improve the platform side.
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Old 09-08-07, 02:10 PM   #5
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I'd slap a pair of old BMX pedals on there. Big, light, cheap, cool. What else is there?
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Old 09-08-07, 02:16 PM   #6
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Problem with your selection is that you'll have to really try hard not to clip in to those pedals. Both sides allow you to clip in.

I'd say the shoes are fine, but find a pedal like the Shimano M324 or Performance Campus. Either of those allow you to clip in on one side and feature a standard pedal on the other with no chance of clipping in. I have those on my commuters and they're great with my work shoes from the gym to office.

The Campus pedal is only about $30 and I've used them for years without a problem. Any MTB shoe that is SPD compatible will work. There are lots. Might want to pick up the shoes locally so you get ones that fit.
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Old 09-08-07, 02:16 PM   #7
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The Jenson page says that those shoes accept SPD-compatible cleats, but from the picture I can't see where they'd go. Assuming the shoes are fairly comfortable and do take cleats, then it looks like a decent deal.

I use a set of Shimano 324s myself (SPD clip on one side, flat platform on the other), and I have almost no problems with them. Great when I'm wearing my bike shoes, nice when I'm not. The only problem is when you have to flip the pedal over to get to the right side (usually to avoid having the clip dig into your non-bike shoes), but you tend to get pretty good at the little kick that's necessary.
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Old 09-08-07, 02:23 PM   #8
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The Wellgo WAM-D10 is the same pedal as the Nashbar Highlander. It's also $15 cheaper at Pricepoint everyday. Sometimes the Nashbar/Perf deals aren't what they seem:

http://pricepoint.com/detail/14234-2...10--Pedals.htm

I have them and they're pretty good. But I don't think they're necessary for tooling around town. The studs on the non clip-in side can really drill your ankle or calf. I know this from experience! I think they're better suited when you really need traction on the pedal like mountain biking. You could remove the studs with an allen wrench though and then they'd be great townie pedals.
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Old 09-08-07, 02:24 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by JustBrowsing View Post
I use a set of Shimano 324s myself (SPD clip on one side, flat platform on the other), and I have almost no problems with them. Great when I'm wearing my bike shoes, nice when I'm not. The only problem is when you have to flip the pedal over to get to the right side (usually to avoid having the clip dig into your non-bike shoes), but you tend to get pretty good at the little kick that's necessary.
I've found that I can just pedal for 1/2 a revolution of the crank and the pedal is on the other side. It's natural and you can just feel for the right side.
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Old 09-08-07, 03:12 PM   #10
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I'd slap a pair of old BMX pedals on there. Big, light, cheap, cool. What else is there?
If you don't have far to travel, 1+. I did this when I was in college. Get those big bear trap pedals so your foot stays on the pedal.

If you are intent on clipless (and I don't blame you if you are; I get frustrated with platforms if I have to take them more than a few miles), I make do with mountain biking shoes with eggbeaters on my commuters. They are walkable and have stiff soles so that cycling is still pretty efficient (though noticeably more inefficient than my road shoes and look pedals). There is very little compromise unless you are walking a lot, which is why I used bear traps on campus; ride to campus then walk everywhere, not good for mountain bike shoes. If you are just popping into stores and running errands on your bike, mountain bike shoes work great and there is little compromise when it comes to cycling with them.
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Old 09-08-07, 03:17 PM   #11
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I will second the M324's I had those on my MTB/Commuter for several years and was very pleased with them.

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Old 09-08-07, 09:24 PM   #12
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The Mallet C is the Eggbeater version of platform/clipless pedals. I have them and they work very well.
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Old 09-08-07, 10:00 PM   #13
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It's not clipless, the MKS GR-9 is a good pedal...and you could add some PowerGrips for retention. Nicely made, comfortable pedal, and you could whatever shoes you want with it.
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Old 09-08-07, 10:22 PM   #14
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I ride with Specialized Sonoma shoes. They're sold as "touring" shoes and the sole has some give to it so its actually decent to walk in. I only wish the cleat was a little more recessed but its not too bad.
I use them in conjunction with either Shimano SPD M747s or M520s
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Old 09-08-07, 10:27 PM   #15
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The Mallet C is the Eggbeater version of platform/clipless pedals. I have them and they work very well.
+1. I got them as my first pair of clipless pedals for my Bad Boy, replaced them with Quattros for a while, then decided to go back to the Mallets on the BB because they're worry-free when riding around town. I don't have to be clipped in at all to get a good start from stoplights. Moved the Quattros to my new road bike, too.

Plus, the Mallet has a grippier surface than the Acid, making it more like a regular BMX/rat trap pedal with regular shoes. You'll feel the spring under the ball of your feet, though; could be uncomfortable on longer rides, but no big deal around the neighborhood.
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Old 09-08-07, 11:18 PM   #16
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I have a pair of the Shimano M324s on my single speed Cross-Check. I like them for the uphill starts so if I miss the clip the first time I still can get the bike moving forward (very important on the SS). I just bought a pair of the performance campus pedals for my new LHT (geared commuter). So far so good! They work with regular Shimano cleats so I can wear my sandals and ride whichever bike I want.
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