Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-09-07, 03:49 PM   #1
pieholden
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 52
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Why bar end shifters?

This was probably my main reason for not buying a complete CrossCheck or LHT. I'm not knocking them but am just wondering the appeal of them over STI's.
pieholden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 03:50 PM   #2
KingTermite 
On my TARDIScycle!
 
KingTermite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Eastside Seattlite Termite Mound
Bikes: Trek 520, Trek Navigator 300, Peugeot Versailles PE10DE
Posts: 3,924
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My Trek 520 had bar end shifters....I really didn't like them much. I ended up switching to trekking/touring handlebars and got grip shifters.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by coffeecake View Post
- it's pretty well established that Hitler was an *******.
KingTermite is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 04:00 PM   #3
nopinkbikes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Bikes: Surly,ANT,Rawland,Fuji,Jamis,Kona
Posts: 135
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
They work great in the winter with large glove/mittens compared to STI. For summer, I prefer th STI though. They are very dependable(Bar end shifters). SO winter and dependability are their two main virtues I like.
nopinkbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 04:00 PM   #4
Treespeed
Warning:Mild Peril
 
Treespeed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Seattle Refugee in Los Angeles
Bikes: Cilo, Surly Pacer, Kona Fire Mountain w/Bob Trailer, Scattante
Posts: 3,171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Once you get used to them they are very nice and completely indestructible.
__________________
Non semper erit aestas.
Treespeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 04:01 PM   #5
HardyWeinberg
GATC
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: south Puget Sound
Bikes:
Posts: 7,492
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 47 Post(s)
I have had not great luck w/ trigger shifters, I like twist shifters fine, and if I was going to err toward newer-fangled than twist or older-fangled, I would go older. So I did. Plus, it's just not easy to correctly index a triple chainring, less annoying to just concede that out of the box and use a friction front shifter. And they're cheaper.
HardyWeinberg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 04:29 PM   #6
martianone
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northern VT
Bikes: recumbent & upright
Posts: 1,876
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
bar ends-
have a nice feel,
are reliable,
and are fairly inexpensive.
martianone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 05:15 PM   #7
dobber
Perineal Pressurized
 
dobber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: In Ebritated
Bikes:
Posts: 6,557
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One of the redeeming features of barends for me is the ability to grab a whole handful of gear at once. None of this push to shift, push to shift crap. I can go from little cog to big cog in one movement. And I can infinitely trim the front.
__________________
This is Africa, 1943. War spits out its violence overhead and the sandy graveyard swallows it up. Her name is King Nine, B-25, medium bomber, Twelfth Air Force. On a hot, still morning she took off from Tunisia to bomb the southern tip of Italy. An errant piece of flak tore a hole in a wing tank and, like a wounded bird, this is where she landed, not to return on this day, or any other day.
dobber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 05:21 PM   #8
John C. Ratliff
Senior Member
 
John C. Ratliff's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Beaverton, Oregon
Bikes: Rans Stratus, Trek 1420, Rivendell Rambouillet
Posts: 1,906
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have bar end shifters on two of my bikes (the other is my recumbant), and I like them over the original shifters mounted on the frame, as they are more accessible. Concerning them compared to STIs, I believe that STIs are probably a bit handier. But the STIs are sitting out there in front, with the brake levers, and in a crash situation would be pretty mangled (potentially). Bar ends, being on the other side of the bar, are much more protected in a crash than the STIs.

John
John C. Ratliff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 05:23 PM   #9
-=(8)=-
♋ ☮♂ ☭ ☯
 
-=(8)=-'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: 40205 'ViLLeBiLLie
Bikes: Sngl Spd's, 70's- 80's vintage, D-tube Folder
Posts: 7,903
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pieholden View Post
This was probably my main reason for not buying a complete CrossCheck or LHT. I'm not knocking them but am just wondering the appeal of them over STI's.

Just the opposite for me. The friction bar ends were a huge plus.
STI and Index are rate slightly above a flat tire in terms of usefulness to me.
__________________
-ADVOCACY-☜ Radical VC = Car people on bikes. Just say "NO"
-=(8)=- is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 05:41 PM   #10
fat_bike_nut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: San Francisco!
Bikes: 2010 Surly LHT (main rider and do-everything bike), 2011 Bike Friday NWT (back-up bike and multi-modal)
Posts: 909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Bar end friction shifting is the simplest shifting for me

When I use trigger or twist grip shifters, I have to go pedal, *click*, pedal, *click*, pedal to get into a desired gear. With friction I just slap it down or push it up until it settles in a cog that feels comfy to pedal.

The first (and only) time I used STI shifters, I didn't like 'em, because I had to put too much of my concentration into remembering which of the 4 shifter paddles did what. "Let's see here...this little one shifts up on this side and down on that side, right?" *click* "Nope. D'oh." *click* "Oh, right. Outer paddle, not inner paddle." *click* "!@#$!@$!" The outer shift lever could shift 3 cogs at once, of course, if I could only remember if it was up or down...

I plan on having all of my future bikes use friction shifting, except for any racing bikes I'll be getting. I plan on doing triathlons...glad those Tri/TT bike things use bar-ends
fat_bike_nut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 05:41 PM   #11
climbhoser
Senior Member
 
climbhoser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Parker, CO
Bikes: SS Surly Crosscheck; '91 Cannondale 3.0
Posts: 1,654
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't like where they're located as much as STI, but I do like friction shifters. It's tough for me to decide, because the best of both worlds would be friction shifters on the convenient part of the bar...that is, where your hands usually are!
climbhoser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 05:53 PM   #12
Banzai
Jet Jockey
 
Banzai's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: St. Paul, MN
Bikes: Cannondale CAAD9, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Nashbar X-frame bike.
Posts: 4,310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by martianone View Post
and are fairly inexpensive.
A lot of the PVI (Pilot-Vehicle Interface) comes to personal preference.

However, they aren't quite as inexpensive as it would appear. Depending on what "level" you're comparing at, bar end shifters plus seperate brake levers isn't that much less then a "brifter", which is your shifter and brake lever together.
__________________
Good night...and good luck
Banzai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 06:39 PM   #13
calebg
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 59
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Other than on a time trial bike, I'll always take STI or Ergo over bar end shifters.

Surly uses them because they're cheap.
calebg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 06:49 PM   #14
Caspar_s
Senior Member
 
Caspar_s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Burlington, ON
Bikes: Giant Tcx1
Posts: 530
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by climbhoser View Post
I don't like where they're located as much as STI, but I do like friction shifters. It's tough for me to decide, because the best of both worlds would be friction shifters on the convenient part of the bar...that is, where your hands usually are!
http://www.paulcomp.com/ Look under thumb shifters
Caspar_s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 06:56 PM   #15
Sizzle-Chest
The Brutally Handsome
 
Sizzle-Chest's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Siberia
Bikes:
Posts: 508
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
while shifting a bike that his heavily loaded, you can maintain your balance much better if you never have to let go of your handlebars, especially on an climb.
Sizzle-Chest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:01 PM   #16
nelson249
"Per Ardua ad Surly"
 
nelson249's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kitchener, Ontario
Bikes: Bianchi Specialissima, Mongoose Hilltopper ATB, Surly Cross-Check, Norco City Glide
Posts: 1,416
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by pieholden View Post
This was probably my main reason for not buying a complete CrossCheck or LHT. I'm not knocking them but am just wondering the appeal of them over STI's.

Easy to use and maintain, dead on reliable in all weather conditions and with heavy gloves and cheap to replace. I've had barcons on two bikes (including a Crosscheck) and I doubt I will ever go to STIs. The barcons were a plus for me.
nelson249 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:01 PM   #17
matthew_deaner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Spencer, IN
Bikes: Trek 5200
Posts: 689
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have two bikes with bar-end shifters, and one with STI.

I love the bar-end shifting for non-racing applications. My hands are usually in the drops, so bar-ends are actually in a more convenient location than are STI shifters (except for shifting during climbs). Plus I like the friction shifting for the front derailler.

The dura-ace 9-speed bar-end shifters I have on my LHT have a wonderfully positive feel. Shifting is very fast. The 8-speed bar-ends I have on my tandem are slower and have a vague feel to the indexing... that may be because of the long cable length required on the tandem.

Last edited by matthew_deaner; 10-09-07 at 07:28 PM.
matthew_deaner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:19 PM   #18
Michel Gagnon
Year-round cyclist
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Montréal (Québec)
Bikes:
Posts: 3,023
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A few advantages for bar-end shifters that weren't mentioned before :

– I know which gear I'm at just by looking at my shifters. Especially useful in the dark and on the tandem.

– Quite accessible from the tops and readily accessible from the drops.

– Works in friction. Especially useful for the front end, because it works with non-standard gears: just trim to your heart's content!

Three noteworthy experiences:
– I prefer by far to set the drops a bit high – about level with the saddle – and to ride mostly on the drops. From the drops, I find not only that bar-end shifters are easy to use, but also that STI shifters are cumbersome. STI works best from the hoods, but I hate that hand position.

– I replace my parts when they are worn or when I need them somewhere else. So for about 2 year, my touring bike was set up with a 9-speed cassette, a 9-speed chain... and 8-speed shifters. No problem, as I used the shifters in friction mode.

– My tandem has 4 chainrings : 48-38-28-18. It's a tight setup, but it works with standard parts: a 105 front derailleur and a bar-end shifter.
Michel Gagnon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:24 PM   #19
Schwinnrider
Mirror slap survivor
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Sunny Florida
Bikes: Gunnar Sport, Surly Pacer, Access MTB, Ibex Corrida, one day a Simple City
Posts: 1,297
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a bike with barcons and a bike with STI. I don't have a functional preference, but the aero levers fit my hands better than the STI do. Plus, the cabling is neater with barcons, and there are no cables to get in the way of my headlight beam.
Schwinnrider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:30 PM   #20
matthew_deaner
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Spencer, IN
Bikes: Trek 5200
Posts: 689
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One other thing... handlebar bags fit when you use barcons because of the inobtrusive cable routing.
matthew_deaner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 07:34 PM   #21
Bolo Grubb
Senior Member
 
Bolo Grubb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Tucson, AZ
Bikes: 1984 Trek 720 with a Nexus hub, 2016 Cannondale Synapse
Posts: 1,831
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
I personally do not like bar end shifters. I kept hitting them with my knees at stops. SO I switched to downtube. Better for my use but now I am thinking it might be time to switch to a nexus hub.
Bolo Grubb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 08:03 PM   #22
MrCjolsen
Senior Member
 
MrCjolsen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Davis CA
Bikes: Surly Cross-Check, '85 Giant road bike (unrecogizable fixed-gear conversion
Posts: 3,957
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Barcons + Tektro brake levers = much cheaper than the cheapest STI.
MrCjolsen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 08:15 PM   #23
cycleup
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Seattle, WA
Bikes:
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I like the physicality of the barcons. Just feels right to reach down and whack the lever into place. I could never get happy about the fiddly feeling of STI shifters. YMMV.
cycleup is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 08:22 PM   #24
fat_bike_nut
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: San Francisco!
Bikes: 2010 Surly LHT (main rider and do-everything bike), 2011 Bike Friday NWT (back-up bike and multi-modal)
Posts: 909
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwinnrider View Post
I don't have a functional preference, but the aero levers fit my hands better than the STI do.
Oh! I forgot about that one! The Shimano Sora/Tiagra aero levers on the Cross-Check I test rode felt nice & comfy, while the Shimano 105 STI levers on the Giant OCR1 I rented did not (not enough padding on the levers)

My main beef with the Cross-Check complete is that the steerer tube is cut too low, but that's a subject for another thread...
fat_bike_nut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-07, 08:22 PM   #25
n4zou
Scott
 
n4zou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Bikes: Too Many
Posts: 2,393
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you have arthritis like me you convert to bar-end or down-tube shifters. You don’t need fingers to shift either type. I can shift them with just my palm if the pain is really bad. With STI you must use your thumb and fingers. Twist grips are impossible to use on bad days.

Over a year ago I built an electric shift system. A Basic Stamp microprocessor drives two stepper motors with cams that pull or release the shift cables as required. I just have two buttons to control both a triple front and rear derailleur. The microprocessor is programmed to select the best ratio between the chain rings and cogs for the next up or down shift.
n4zou is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:02 AM.