Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    My Bikes
    Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid
    Posts
    10,560
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    What a difference keeping your wrists warm makes

    Lately, I've been having trouble with freezing my hands when it wasn't that cold outside. Because of some unusual problems I was having that go beyond simple cold fingers, I saw a doc. She told me that I need cover my wrists and forearms better when riding because getting those too cold will cause me to freeze my fingers even if I'm wearing warm gloves.

    Today, commuting conditions were nippy (24F and foggy accompanied by light headwinds) so I decided to see if the advice works. The difference was incredible. Rather than having the normal freezing finger problems, they were warm and even a bit sweaty. So, if you're having trouble freezing your fingers and your gloves should be heavy enough, you might try protecting your wrists and forearms better.

  2. #2
    34x25 FTW! oboeguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    NYC
    My Bikes
    Kona Jake, Scott CR1, Dahon SpeedPro
    Posts
    6,008
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmm, maybe I'll put arm warmers on under my long-sleeved base layer. I, believe, though, that my chilly fingers are dude to the fact that they have no meat on them. Skinny artist's fingers FTW!
    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Order
    Quote Originally Posted by sknhgy
    I do not want to be associated with the kind of riders that come through my neck of the woods on weekends, dressed in superhero costumes
    Do they wear capes?
    ---

    http://www.cycopaths.net/

  3. #3
    Senior Member littlewaywelt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,509
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    keeping certain areas and your core warm will keep your hands comfortable. Wrists, neck, armpits, core.
    saw an interesting study where a guy wore an electric heated vest no gloves and he functionned far longer when the vest was on even though his hands were exposed as the vest tricked the body into not constricting the blood vessels in the extremities, making them cool faster.
    One Less Car
    Conservation begins with you.

  4. #4
    Senior Member duppie's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    516
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by banerjek View Post
    Lately, I've been having trouble with freezing my hands when it wasn't that cold outside. Because of some unusual problems I was having that go beyond simple cold fingers, I saw a doc. She told me that I need cover my wrists and forearms better when riding because getting those too cold will cause me to freeze my fingers even if I'm wearing warm gloves.

    Today, commuting conditions were nippy (24F and foggy accompanied by light headwinds) so I decided to see if the advice works. The difference was incredible. Rather than having the normal freezing finger problems, they were warm and even a bit sweaty. So, if you're having trouble freezing your fingers and your gloves should be heavy enough, you might try protecting your wrists and forearms better.
    banerjek, you care to elaborate on what you wore? arm warmers?
    Duppie

  5. #5
    ride for a change modernjess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    My Bikes
    Surly Cross-check & Moonlander, Pivot Mach 429, Ted Wojcik Sof-Trac, Ridley Orion. Santa Cruz Stigmata
    Posts
    2,055
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Does anyone think this might apply to feet as well? Ankles or legs being warmer = warmer feet?

    I can use all the help I can get to keep my feet warm these days.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    52
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Somewhere you can buy wrist bands that hold chemical hand warmers. I think the idea is to keep your blood warm going into your hands. I think. I put hand warmers between my glove liners and my gloves at the wrist.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    NorCal
    My Bikes
    2009 Surly Cross Check Frankenbike
    Posts
    522
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Machka in the Long Distance forum says keeping the pulse points in your wrists and ankles warm will help keep hands and feet warm. She uses things like sweat bands on the wrists, for example.

  8. #8
    Senior Member littlewaywelt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,509
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The idea by using warmers or insulation at these points is to keep the blood vessels from dilating, as they are very close to the skin here.
    One Less Car
    Conservation begins with you.

  9. #9
    Portland Fred banerjek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    My Bikes
    Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid
    Posts
    10,560
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by duppie View Post
    banerjek, you care to elaborate on what you wore? arm warmers?
    Duppie
    Just arm warmers and 2 long sleeve jerseys. In the past, I liked to freeze my arms as a way to regulate body temperature. However, I didn't realize that doing so made my hands freeze so bad.

    I think the same logic can be used on feet as well. What I've been doing lately is dressing a little warmer and I'm pretty happy with the results.

  10. #10
    Seņior Member ItsJustMe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    My Bikes
    Windsor Fens, Giant Seek 0 (2014, Alfine 8 + discs)
    Posts
    11,731
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by littlewaywelt View Post
    The idea by using warmers or insulation at these points is to keep the blood vessels from dilating, as they are very close to the skin here.
    Don't you mean keep them from contracting? I think you want the vessels dilated, so they'll continue to provide warmth to the hands.
    Work: the 8 hours that separates bike rides.

  11. #11
    RT
    RT is offline
    The Weird Beard RT's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    COS
    Posts
    8,528
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This morning was 14 degrees out, but I thought I was prepared. I had a long sleeve base layer, long sleeve jersey, thick sweatshirt, fleece glove liners and Thermalite gloves over. My wrists were covered, but my fingers froze. I believe it was because my hands sweat, and that moisture was exposed to the wind (even what little got through the gloves), causing the freezing effect. It was absolutely no fun. For my feet I wear Gators, which work like a charm. Can anyone recommend a good heavy windproof glove that will actually keep hands warm? Freezing fingers are enough to make me give up winter commuting unless I can solve this problem.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    113
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If the liners plus the gloves make for a tight fit, your fingers will get cold even if you're hanging out indoors. This is another reason why mittens tend to be warmer than gloves. The individual digits aren't constricted.
    When riders first start learning to ride in icy or snowy conditions, or start out a ride cold, shivering and tense, they tend to keep a very right grip on the bars. This tight grip further restricts circulation.
    The best hand protection has a combination of a insulation, loose fit, totally windproof, with a cuff that has a long gauntlet with cinching cords. I also find that leather becomes very cold and the cold transfers right to the hand. I'd rather have a kevlar or other sturdy fabric palm and underside to the fingers.
    How you wear the gloves and shirts is also important. Shirt and coat cuffs directly cover the wrist while the glove gauntlet covers both the shirt and overcoat cuff.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Silver Spring, MD
    My Bikes
    Fuji Supreme
    Posts
    1,701
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I found over the past couple of winters that I can actually fine tune body temp by baring my wrists and or neck to cool off a little when shedding a full layer is not called for. The other thing to add or remove is your hat.

    The body prioritizes areas to keep warm. Your head and torso with the brain and vital organs are high priority so the colder they are the more blood flow will be restricted to the extremities in order to save the heat for your core. The warmer you keep your core the more blood will flow out to your extremities as the body tries to regulate its temp. This is most evident with hands, but also holds true for feet. Covering your ankles well is probably not going to have as noticeable an effect on cold feet as covering your wrists. Your blood vessels simply don't run that close to the surface in your ankles -- hence why we don't check pulses or draw blood from ankles.

    I have found that to keep my toes warm I really need to minimize the effects of wind as I ride. When it gets really cold I switch to some lightly insulated hiking boots which completely block the wind. If I throw in a pair of chemical toe warmers, my toes can be downright toasty.

    So keep experimenting until you hit the right combinations. Its a good idea to keep track of temps and windchills at which you were comfortable and uncomfortable so that over time you will get a very good sense of what to where at what temps.
    God grant me the serenity to accept the hills and winds I cannot change;
    courage to challenge the cagers I can; and wisdom to know the difference.
    (with apologies to AA)
    24 mi. roundtrip -- Maryland suburbs to DC and back.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Frisco, CO
    My Bikes
    '93 Bridgestone MB-3, '88 Marinoni road bike, '00 Marinoni Piuma, '01 Riv A/R
    Posts
    1,059
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Last winter I was camping out in -10 F temps. I was really comfortable when I woke up, but as soon as I put on a fairly heavy metal wristwatch I could feel the heat being sucked out of my body. It was interesting, to say the least.

    I've acquired a couple of insuating garments with extra long sleeves and thumb holes, they really seem to help keep me warmer.

  15. #15
    Just your average member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Luxembourg
    My Bikes
    Bunch of stuff. Cervelo Road bike. Cannodale Trekking and MTB
    Posts
    11
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by markf View Post
    Last winter I was camping out in -10 F temps. I was really comfortable when I woke up, but as soon as I put on a fairly heavy metal wristwatch I could feel the heat being sucked out of my body. It was interesting, to say the least.
    .

    Interesting observation - I have found a similar situation. I commute in temperatures down to -10c and found that although my fingers were fine in winter gloves my thumb was often freezing and numb - I realised that my thumb was resting on the metal clamp of my shifter/brakes. I covered this with a bit of bar tape and this made a huge difference.
    365 commuter and reluctant mechanic..

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    IL
    My Bikes
    Specialized Crosstrail Expert
    Posts
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm very appreciative of this post. I'm on my fourth pair of gloves now and they finally worked this morning--no cold fingers. The trick was the extra extension that tightens beyond the wrists. This is crucial for me because I'm tall and my jacket will not velcro around regular gloves. With these I am able to tuck the jacket (and wrist bands) into the gloves and create a complete seal. Right now I'm using a pair of Gordini Aquabloc Down Gauntlets (that seemed to be getting cold towards the end of my 30 minute ride in 32š, 17MPH winds), but I've also ordered the Pearl Izumi Lobsters to see how they compare. Any other recommendations would be appreciated Thanks.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Irving, TX
    My Bikes
    2007 Cervelo SLC-SL
    Posts
    58
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by effigy View Post
    I'm very appreciative of this post. I'm on my fourth pair of gloves now and they finally worked this morning--no cold fingers. The trick was the extra extension that tightens beyond the wrists. This is crucial for me because I'm tall and my jacket will not velcro around regular gloves. With these I am able to tuck the jacket (and wrist bands) into the gloves and create a complete seal. Right now I'm using a pair of Gordini Aquabloc Down Gauntlets (that seemed to be getting cold towards the end of my 30 minute ride in 32š, 17MPH winds), but I've also ordered the Pearl Izumi Lobsters to see how they compare. Any other recommendations would be appreciated Thanks.
    I'm going to try some of the things mentioned in this thread, but I also wanted to say, I really like my PI Lobsters. I always have cold hands, but they make them down right toasting most of the time.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,522
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've been using my usual winter mittens on the bike. They're a traditional style of Norwegian mitten, knit at a looser gauge than a traditional pair would be. 100% wool, fairly long cuffs, fairly loose for a mitten. If I'm out and active, my hands can end up *too* warm and start sweating. Once temperatures reach 0 F with strong wind, that will stop, but today's 19 F meant sweaty hands. I can handle gear shifts easily, since the mittens are loose enough to give me the use of individual fingers.

    If the wind and temperatures get to the point where my usual mittens don't work, I'll knit myself a second pair at a more traditional gauge. It may seem counter-intuitive, but on a traditional mitten, little tiny stitches tend to mean it's a warmer mitten. Larger stitches mean the mitten is less wind resistant.

    I tend to avoid gloves in very cold temperatures. It's pretty rare for a glove to be loose enough to keep my hands warm *and* provide a real dexterity advantage over my mittens.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    IL
    My Bikes
    Specialized Crosstrail Expert
    Posts
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by kraxmel View Post
    I really like my PI Lobsters.
    How long are the cuffs on those?

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Irving, TX
    My Bikes
    2007 Cervelo SLC-SL
    Posts
    58
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by effigy View Post
    How long are the cuffs on those?
    The elastic band is right at my wrist and the cuff is another 2 inches past that. They have no problem covering the end of the sleeves on the jacket I wear.

  21. #21
    Enjoy
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Seattle metro
    My Bikes
    Trek 5200
    Posts
    6,167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    +1 Most jersey and jacket sleeves are too short. If you have this problem you can cut off the ankle of a worn out sock an wear it around your forearm and wrist. This worked well so I've actually attached the extension to the heavier jerseys or sweaters. The extension tends to drag down lighter weight jerseys though.

    Quote Originally Posted by effigy View Post
    The trick was the extra extension that tightens beyond the wrists. This is crucial for me because I'm tall and my jacket will not velcro around regular gloves. With these I am able to tuck the jacket (and wrist bands) into the gloves and create a complete seal.

  22. #22
    Senior Member bhchdh's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hampton Roads VA
    My Bikes
    '07 Trek 520, '10 Gary Fisher Triton, '04 Trek 8000, '85 Trek 500, '84 Trek 610, '85 Trek 510, '92 Trek Multitrack 700
    Posts
    1,579
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    "Can anyone recommend a good heavy windproof glove that will actually keep hands warm? Freezing fingers are enough to make me give up winter commuting unless I can solve this problem."

    I had apair of North Face "technical" gloves that I purchased at an outdoor sports specialty store that worked suprisingly well for me last winter. I did not ride in weather below about 30F though. As I recall they had these gloves in several different temperature ranges.

    It may have been these:
    http://www.thenorthface.com/opencms/...dc=0C5,001,163
    Last edited by bhchdh; 12-01-07 at 09:02 AM.

  23. #23
    Enjoy
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Seattle metro
    My Bikes
    Trek 5200
    Posts
    6,167
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    These Kombi gloves are good to -10F at any speed. Make sure the mitten or glove you choose still allows you to brake adequately though.

    I bought this mitten about 7yrs ago...still holding up...price seems to have jumped but maybe you can get it cheaper elsewhere. Notice that the mittens clip together so you don't loose one. Very handy.
    http://www.snowshack.com/detail/SNW+KB%2D02035+L
    Last edited by vrkelley; 12-01-07 at 10:15 AM.

  24. #24
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    I ride where the thylacine roamed!
    My Bikes
    Lots
    Posts
    39,171
    Mentioned
    36 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Criner View Post
    Machka in the Long Distance forum says keeping the pulse points in your wrists and ankles warm will help keep hands and feet warm. She uses things like sweat bands on the wrists, for example.
    Yup! I heard it for the first time on a radio program in Winnipeg where they were talking about winter survival ... like living outside in the winter like the Inuit do. The suggestion was to wear a band of real fur around the wrists, with the fur side in. For the feet, the suggestion was to wear a wider band of fur around the ankles, fur side in.

    At the time I was working for Canada Post where I was outside in the cold for hours on end, and where I had to have manual dexterity ... so I couldn't wear heavy mitts or gloves. I was freezing my fingers. When I heard that program I started layering up my wrists with other materials, and to my [happy] surprise, I could work down to about -15C with bare hands. After -15C, I needed to wear those little mini-glove you can get in Walmart for $1. It was great!!

    I have since purchased those sweat band things which tennis players wear, and I wear them on cool-cold days, and my hands are nice and warm.

    As for the feet, have a look at my Cold Feet article here: http://www.machka.net/whatworks/coldfeet.htm

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •