Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 125
  1. #1
    Senior Member bellweatherman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Austin
    My Bikes
    Too many to count
    Posts
    2,069
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Why is it so hard to find commuting bikes with 26" wheels?

    Looking around lately in the bike shops for a good commuting bike and seems like the vast majority of commuting bikes are built around a 700c road tire. This doesn't really make any sense to me. In my mind, a 26" wheel is far more appropriate for the majority of commuters.

    A 26" MTB wheelsize is more maneuverable. Smooth tires are no longer difficult to find for 26" MTB sized wheels. In fact, you can get really wide fat tires that can handle any city pothole type riding, plus it would be ooh so comfortable. And with a rear rack on a bike built for 26" MTB rims would mean a lower center of gravity. 26" tires and tubes are far more available than 700c tires and tubes, especially in developing countries. Better tires, more comfort, better for use with a rack. What's not to like? Can someone tell me why commuting bikes are so hard to find commuting bikes w/ 26" wheels?
    Livestrong. The personal fundmaker of Lance Armstrong. The company who are in business to not donate to cancer research, but only to inform people that cancer is bad.

    Armstrong. The man without integrity, no care for the sport, and no problem with testing positive for EPO and making donations to cover it up.

    01101010101010001010

  2. #2
    I like my car ShadowGray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Because 700c wheels are designed for road and speed? And, 26" is smaller... a larger wheel size is equal to greater tangential speed I believe... vt = r*omega, where vt is tangential velocity, r is radius and omega is angular velocity. Radius is proportional to speed.

    I guess the thinking is that a commuter should be a comfortable road bike meant to handle paved roads as opposed to warzone terrain. What they don't take into account that most of the paved roads around here is warzone terrain.

  3. #3
    Senior Member tjspiel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    6,809
    Mentioned
    9 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bellweatherman View Post
    Looking around lately in the bike shops for a good commuting bike and seems like the vast majority of commuting bikes are built around a 700c road tire. This doesn't really make any sense to me. In my mind, a 26" wheel is far more appropriate for the majority of commuters.

    A 26" MTB wheelsize is more maneuverable. Smooth tires are no longer difficult to find for 26" MTB sized wheels. In fact, you can get really wide fat tires that can handle any city pothole type riding, plus it would be ooh so comfortable. And with a rear rack on a bike built for 26" MTB rims would mean a lower center of gravity. 26" tires and tubes are far more available than 700c tires and tubes, especially in developing countries. Better tires, more comfort, better for use with a rack. What's not to like? Can someone tell me why commuting bikes are so hard to find commuting bikes w/ 26" wheels?
    I think it's hard to say what's appropriate for the majority of commuters since individual situations vary so widely. I also think that by the time you put a big wide tire on a 26" rim, you've eliminated any increase in maneuverability and significantly reduced the advantage in center of gravity. If you include the tires when measuring there isn't much difference in the diameter between my road bike wheels and my MTB wheels.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bellweatherman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Austin
    My Bikes
    Too many to count
    Posts
    2,069
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yeah, I'd like to make it to work on time, but it's not like I'm in a race. I mean, I don't think that most people buying commuting bike are evaluating two different size bikes going, "hey which one is faster?" That just doesn't seem like that would be realistic.

    There is one thing though. MTB smooth tires are ALOT more comfy than road tires. You can get the MTB tires alot wider and fatter which makes them alot more comfrotable. Seems like commuters would be more interested in comfort than speed.
    Livestrong. The personal fundmaker of Lance Armstrong. The company who are in business to not donate to cancer research, but only to inform people that cancer is bad.

    Armstrong. The man without integrity, no care for the sport, and no problem with testing positive for EPO and making donations to cover it up.

    01101010101010001010

  5. #5
    domestique squeakywheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    off the back
    Posts
    2,005
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I like how Surly does it with the Long Haul Trucker. 26" wheels on the smaller frame sizes and 700c wheels on the larger frame sizes. Makes sense to me.

    Some of the boutique brands have 650B wheeled commuter style bikes. Those wheels are similar to 26 inch MTB wheels (with street tires). I'm not a 650B fan, but they do address the OP's issue.

    Edit: 1980's steel rigid fork mountain bikes make good commuters. Find a nice used Specialized Hardrock or Rockhopper.
    Last edited by squeakywheel; 05-14-08 at 02:45 PM.
    Clinging to my guns and religion.

  6. #6
    Velocommuter Commando Sirrus Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    My Bikes
    '88 Specialized Sirrus, '89 Alpine Monitor Pass, two '70 Raligh Twenties, '07 Schwinn Town & Country Trike, '07 Specialized Sirrus Hybrid
    Posts
    2,546
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bellweatherman View Post
    Looking around lately in the bike shops for a good commuting bike and seems like the vast majority of commuting bikes are built around a 700c road tire. This doesn't really make any sense to me. In my mind, a 26" wheel is far more appropriate for the majority of commuters.

    A 26" MTB wheelsize is more maneuverable. Smooth tires are no longer difficult to find for 26" MTB sized wheels. In fact, you can get really wide fat tires that can handle any city pothole type riding, plus it would be ooh so comfortable. And with a rear rack on a bike built for 26" MTB rims would mean a lower center of gravity. 26" tires and tubes are far more available than 700c tires and tubes, especially in developing countries. Better tires, more comfort, better for use with a rack. What's not to like? Can someone tell me why commuting bikes are so hard to find commuting bikes w/ 26" wheels?
    It's just a matter of looking. What you describe is a Breezer Town bike to a "T"

    http://www.breezerbikes.com/index.cf...TOKEN=58479677

  7. #7
    not a role model JeffS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    4,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    [QUOTE=bellweatherman;6694285Can someone tell me why commuting bikes are so hard to find commuting bikes w/ 26" wheels?
    [/QUOTE]

    Where are you looking? They're all over the place.

  8. #8
    kipuka explorer bkrownd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hilo Town, East Hawai'i
    My Bikes
    1994 Trek 820, 2004 Fuji Absolute, 2005 Jamis Nova, 1977 Schwinn Scrambler 36/36
    Posts
    3,275
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bellweatherman View Post
    There is one thing though. MTB smooth tires are ALOT more comfy than road tires. You can get the MTB tires alot wider and fatter which makes them alot more comfrotable. Seems like commuters would be more interested in comfort than speed.
    How wide do you really need? You can get plenty of 37-45mm 700 tires. My "mountain bike" tires are 1.75" = 45mm. Personally I don't find big tires to be more "comfortable" than my 25mm tires on pavement. I have some 38s around I can swap in for gravel or off-roading.
    --
    -=- '05 Jamis Nova -=- '04 Fuji Absolute -=- '94 Trek 820 -=- '77 Schwinn Scrambler 36/36 -=-
    Friends don't let friends use brifters.

  9. #9
    Senior Member bellweatherman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Austin
    My Bikes
    Too many to count
    Posts
    2,069
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffS View Post
    Where are you looking? They're all over the place.

    That's weird. I haven't seen hardly any 26" wheel commuters in the bike shops. Most of the bike shops have 700c commuters. What brands have a 26" wheel purpose-built commuter?

    Trek has 700c commuters
    Specialized 700c commuters.
    Swobo 700c commuters
    Electra 700c commuters
    where are the 26" commuters?

    Oh and really wide 26" tires are good. I tried some Schwalbe fat apples in a 26x2.3" and they are sooooo comfy. Floating over any rough pavement is a breeze.
    Livestrong. The personal fundmaker of Lance Armstrong. The company who are in business to not donate to cancer research, but only to inform people that cancer is bad.

    Armstrong. The man without integrity, no care for the sport, and no problem with testing positive for EPO and making donations to cover it up.

    01101010101010001010

  10. #10
    Senior Member katmu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Minnesota
    My Bikes
    1985 Trek 620 and 2006 Breezer Villager
    Posts
    117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    My Breezer has 26" tires that are 1.5" wide. I have a small frame size so it feels just right for me.

  11. #11
    Retro-nerd georgiaboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Morningside - Atlanta
    My Bikes
    2002 Cannondale Badboy, 2004 Bianchi Vigorelli
    Posts
    1,584
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some 26" wheel bikes.

    Cannondale European Series

    Surly Long Haul Trucker (In the smaller sizes)
    Thorn Cycles
    Masi Soulville

    Having ridden 700cc and 26" wheels, I can tell that you can cruise better with the 700cc and high pressure tires. However, if commuting in an urban area with repeated stops due to traffic control, intersections, and no shoulder, etc. it minimizes the speed factor. I think 26" wheels are better for climbing, quick-evasive moves, and accelerating from a stop. Also, as far as, small stature riders (like me ) riding a frame with smaller wheels helps to give a better geometry. Small frame bikes with 700cc wheels all to often have to move the seat tube to a more vertical point where you hip placement to the pedals causes you to lose power, IMHO.

    Masi Soulville
    Last edited by georgiaboy; 05-14-08 at 03:44 PM.
    Would you like a dream with that?

  12. #12
    Packfodding 3 caloso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, California, USA
    My Bikes
    Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    29,674
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by squeakywheel View Post
    I like how Surly does it with the Long Haul Trucker. 26" wheels on the smaller frame sizes and 700c wheels on the larger frame sizes. Makes sense to me.

    Some of the boutique brands have 650B wheeled commuter style bikes. Those wheels are similar to 26 inch MTB wheels (with street tires). I'm not a 650B fan, but they do address the OP's issue.

    Edit: 1980's steel rigid fork mountain bikes make good commuters. Find a nice used Specialized Hardrock or Rockhopper.
    Cyclists of the world, unite! You have nothing to lube but your chains!

  13. #13
    Ogr8nwmypstmksnosnse pgoat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    My Bikes
    1986 Trek 500, 2003 Orbea Team Euskaltel, 2005 Cannondale R1000
    Posts
    2,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by squeakywheel View Post

    Edit: 1980's steel rigid fork mountain bikes make good commuters. Find a nice used Specialized Hardrock or Rockhopper.
    What they said

    My commuter is a '93 Marin, all steel, no shocks, 1" slicks pumped up to 95-105 psi. Heavy compared to a road bike of course, but it's under 30 pounds with rack. I can live with that....long as there's a granny ring on there!!
    Quote Originally Posted by jsharr View Post
    People whose sig line does not include a jsharr quote annoy me.

  14. #14
    Senior Member bellweatherman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Austin
    My Bikes
    Too many to count
    Posts
    2,069
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    that's one hot looking Masi, I also like that old Rockhopper. Well, now I'm torn between getting a 700c commuter opposed to a 26" wheel commuter.

    I guess I like the fact that you guys say that 700c wheels are alot faster than the 26" smooth MTB tires. And seems like some of you guys think that 700c tires are just as comfortable. Ugh. Was I wrong initially to want a 26" wheeled bike?
    Last edited by bellweatherman; 05-14-08 at 03:53 PM.
    Livestrong. The personal fundmaker of Lance Armstrong. The company who are in business to not donate to cancer research, but only to inform people that cancer is bad.

    Armstrong. The man without integrity, no care for the sport, and no problem with testing positive for EPO and making donations to cover it up.

    01101010101010001010

  15. #15
    Packfodding 3 caloso's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Sacramento, California, USA
    My Bikes
    Ridley Excalibur, Gazelle Champion Mondial, On-One Pompino, Specialized Rock Hopper
    Posts
    29,674
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Bianchi Milano is a 26in wheel bike, now that I think about it. My mom has one. Nice bike.
    Cyclists of the world, unite! You have nothing to lube but your chains!

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Dover, NH USA
    My Bikes
    1986 Bridgestone 500, 1981 Motobecane Super Mirage
    Posts
    245
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by squeakywheel View Post
    1980's steel rigid fork mountain bikes make good commuters.
    So are '80s road bikes [on 27" tires in this case]:



    I started commuting on this guy. Put several hundred commuter miles on it. Very comfy and reliable, and 26" tires. Eventually moved on because of the front suspension, upright seating, and short gearing.



    Both of the above were purchased used for well under $150 each and are great commuters.

  17. #17
    not a role model JeffS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    4,645
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bellweatherman View Post
    What brands have a 26" wheel purpose-built commuter?
    Well, if you say it like that...

    I would counter though, with the question of how many of us are riding "purpose built" (by the manufacturer) commuters.

    I guess I was thinking that basically any 26" hybrid or rigid MTB was a commuter.

    Off the top of my head, I'd say Breezer and the novara transfer qualify.

    The Electra Balloon 8 is right there. You're probably better off that they've chosen not to include their crappy lights/fenders.

    Electra commuter (townie) 21

    Retrovelo/Velorbis if you're feeling rich.

    Biria

  18. #18
    derailleurs are overrated bigbenaugust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    KIGX
    My Bikes
    2009 Motobecane Fantom CX, 2012 Motobecane Fantom Cross Uno SSCX
    Posts
    1,729
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Old rigid mountain bike + slicks + rack == win.

    Or you can do what I did and just pick up a cheapo frame from Nashbar and build your own.
    --Ben
    Carrboro Bike Coalition - putting the "bike" in "CARrboro" :)
    2011 Motobecane Fantom Cross Uno, 2009 Motobecane Fantom CX
    Previously: 2000 Trek 4500 (2000-2003), 2003 Novara Randonee (2003-2006), 2003 Giant Rainier (2003-2008), 2005 Xootr Swift (2005-2007), 2007 Nashbar 1x9 (2007-2011), 2011 Windsor Shetland (2011-2014)
    Current Linux Usage (by machine): Arch: I openSUSE: III

  19. #19
    domestique squeakywheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    off the back
    Posts
    2,005
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Both my commuters are 1980's steel bikes with no shocks. Both are single speed conversions with fenders and racks.

    The summer commuter is a lower-end Raleigh road bike with straight gauge chromolly tubes. I rode it for a couple years on the original 27 inch wheels until I got tired of replacing broken spokes. Now it has 700c x 28 wheels. It has clipless pedals.

    My Winter commuter is a Specialized Hard Rock with straight gauge cromolly tubes. It is geared lower than the Raleigh, has wider tires, and has platform pedals.
    Clinging to my guns and religion.

  20. #20
    kipuka explorer bkrownd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hilo Town, East Hawai'i
    My Bikes
    1994 Trek 820, 2004 Fuji Absolute, 2005 Jamis Nova, 1977 Schwinn Scrambler 36/36
    Posts
    3,275
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bellweatherman View Post
    I guess I like the fact that you guys say that 700c wheels are alot faster than the 26" smooth MTB tires. And seems like some of you guys think that 700c tires are just as comfortable. Ugh. Was I wrong initially to want a 26" wheeled bike?
    I just don't know that it makes a lot of difference either way, unless now and then you want something you can put some serious off-road knobbies or seriously narrow road racing tires on. I doubt that 700c are any "faster" than 26", for the same width tire on (basically) the same bike.
    --
    -=- '05 Jamis Nova -=- '04 Fuji Absolute -=- '94 Trek 820 -=- '77 Schwinn Scrambler 36/36 -=-
    Friends don't let friends use brifters.

  21. #21
    I like my car ShadowGray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bkrownd View Post
    I just don't know that it makes a lot of difference either way, unless now and then you want something you can put some serious off-road knobbies or seriously narrow road racing tires on. I doubt that 700c are any "faster" than 26", for the same width tire on (basically) the same bike.
    For the same rotational input and width, the larger wheels are faster, because bigger radius = greater tangential speed.

  22. #22
    kipuka explorer bkrownd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hilo Town, East Hawai'i
    My Bikes
    1994 Trek 820, 2004 Fuji Absolute, 2005 Jamis Nova, 1977 Schwinn Scrambler 36/36
    Posts
    3,275
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ShadowGray View Post
    For the same rotational input and width, the larger wheels are faster, because bigger radius = greater tangential speed.
    We have this newfangled thing called "gears" to take care of that. HTH
    --
    -=- '05 Jamis Nova -=- '04 Fuji Absolute -=- '94 Trek 820 -=- '77 Schwinn Scrambler 36/36 -=-
    Friends don't let friends use brifters.

  23. #23
    I like my car ShadowGray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,628
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    lol, well you did say that all else is practically equal, with the same bike and width.

    Of course different gearings would affect speed, but then again what's stopping you from putting the same gear on the 700c?

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Far NorthEast Texas
    My Bikes
    Trek SU200, old Wards Hawthorne 3-speed
    Posts
    87
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    May not be purpose-built, but how about add rack & fenders to one of these?

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...rt_urban/su20/

    LBS? Here, DNE!

  25. #25
    Senior Member envane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    828
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bkrownd View Post
    We have this newfangled thing called "gears" to take care of that. HTH
    A chain and cogs is too hard to maintain, and takes away from the pure riding experience.



    the punters can have their "safety bicycles" (lol!)>

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •