Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-18-08, 05:40 PM   #1
peterbennett9
Member
Thread Starter
 
peterbennett9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Bangor, Northern ireland
Bikes: Dolan Precursa, Cube Agree GTC Race, Charge Juicer, Dahon Speed Pro TT, Dahon Matrix, Specialized Sirrus
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Double or Single sided pedals??

Im after a set of clipless pedals for my commuting bike. I would like a set that also has a platform so i can ride it occasionally with normal shoes, but i see some have the clipless part on oneside and the platform on the other and some have both on both sides, so which should i get? will the ones with the clipless on one side and platform on the other not be really annoying because you would have to make sure u had the right side up every time you move off after stopping at lights?
peterbennett9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 06:00 PM   #2
harrier
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have the Shimano PD-A530 clipless platforms on my Miyata for commuting. I love them. Really love them.

Yes, you only get to use one side, and 50% of the time that side is down when you get started. However, I used to use toeclips and 100% of the time the wrong side was up.

I then went to clipless and liked it, but I got sick of having to have an extra pair of shoes to go 5 miles.

When you put your foot down on the pedal (dual side), and it is on the wrong side - easy to tell, then you just lift your foot, continue for 1/2 of a revolution, and put your foot down (or in). The motion of the crank puts the pedal in the right position. Easy Peasy as my wife would say.
harrier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 06:02 PM   #3
chrism32205
Senior Member
 
chrism32205's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Bikes: Bianchi Axis (commuter), Specialized Tricross S-Works, BMC Team Machine SLT01, Mercier Kilo TT
Posts: 668
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well this is an easy one.. 2 bikes.

No seriously, I do believe they make a clipless than is double sided, that has a platform type pedal base on it.

Research this model:



http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...pless%20Pedals
chrism32205 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 07:02 PM   #4
BarracksSi
Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped.
 
BarracksSi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes: Some bikes. Hell, they're all the same, ain't they?
Posts: 13,858
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Another usable option would be Crank Brothers Mallet pedals.
BarracksSi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 07:05 PM   #5
benda18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Durham, NC
Bikes: LHT + FreeRadical
Posts: 454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i had the same dilemma 2 years ago. bought a shimano platform / clipless pedal and probably used the platform side two times. i now roll with an spd double sided pedal.

although it's nice not having to flip around hunting for the correct side of the pedal, i didn't feel like it was ever a safety issue, just annoying. after a while i learned to have the pedal oriented such that the platform would be face down when i was ready to clip in.
benda18 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 07:37 PM   #6
chrism32205
Senior Member
 
chrism32205's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Bikes: Bianchi Axis (commuter), Specialized Tricross S-Works, BMC Team Machine SLT01, Mercier Kilo TT
Posts: 668
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I use shimano m520's, the double sided clipless pedal and wear mtb shoes.. ive gotten used to it. It feels natural after awhile..
chrism32205 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 07:40 PM   #7
Wanderer
aka Phil Jungels
 
Wanderer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: North Aurora, IL
Bikes: 08 Specialized Crosstrail Sport, 05 Sirrus Comp
Posts: 7,552
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have the Shimano 324s, and love them.
Wanderer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 07:55 PM   #8
Bat22
Didn't make it
 
Bat22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Weymouth, Mass.
Bikes:
Posts: 931
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't use cleats on a commute. The clip side (the heavier side ) is usually
facing down. I can tell when it isn't and just flip it with a flik of my ankle.
I've gotten so used to doing it that motion is allmost done subconsciously.
Bat22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 08:32 PM   #9
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Double or single sided?
It makes no real difference, even if you ride clipless all the time, it's not hard to flip a pedal.

As far as using the platform side, that depends on the amount you wear your shoes off the bike.

SPD shoes can be walked in and are quite comfortable. However, the sole does wear down and if you do a lot of walking, you can wind up walking on the cleats which isn't a lot of fun. Added to that, stiff soled shoes aren't real good for sitting around inside. Cycling shoes are great on the bike, off the bike, even SPDs get a tad annoying.

There are solutions to mixing riding and a lot of walking.

The most obvious is to carry a pair of walking shoes and change at the end of the ride. This is fine if you don't mind carrying stuff and mucking about with your clothing.

The second is to have a pair of walking shoes at your destination. That's fine if you have that luxury, a lot of us don't.

The third is not to wear shoes at the other end. Where I've been doing volunteer work, one of the bike commuters gets around the office in his socks all day. Weird but true.

My solution has been to go to the new style mtb or bmx shoe. They have a flat sole, some stiffening for support though not a lot and can be lived in all day. They suit me because I wear one pair of shoes that allows me to ride but can be walking in all day over some quite long distances (5km on pavement in SPD shoes soon shoes up their limitations).

As far as pedals goes. I don't like plain platforms. I've got the M324s on two of my bike but tend not to use the platform side because I don't like the floaty feel of platforms and prefer to take the time to change into my cycling shoes for short ride up to the shops. I've tried the mtb pedals with all the little studs but don't really like them either. My commuter now wears toe clips.

Interestingly, my fixed gear bike currently has M324s and I don't mind using the platforms on that (as opposed to freewheel bikes where I hate them) but will probably go to toe clips pretty soon. My sports bike currently has M324s but is only ridden with clipless shoes - she may change because I want to use her as a commuter now and then.

The clipless system is great for positioning your feet, but that is only a good thing if your cleats are in the right place and considering they are still discovering where the 'right' place is, I'm not sure that's as great an advantage as people imagine. Certainly, getting the cleats wrong can cause quite a few problems and no, the ball of your foot over the pedal spindle is NOT the right place - like KOPS, it's been disproved.

The clipless system is great for keeping your feet in contact with the pedals but does it really lead to more efficient pedalling? The claim is 'yes', but how much more efficient is up for argument. A lot of people imagine that they gain power by pulling up on the pedals but that has been disproven by strain gauge measurements - unless you are an elite athlete in a full on sprint, the most you are doing is getting your foot out of the way of the rising pedal.

Clipless does add a huge amount of confidence to your cycling ... especially when turning insane revs on your fixed gear bike down that long hill.

In short though, you don't need clipless and it's not doing a lot for your cycling, despite the claims made by marketers and the race boy set. However, the intangible advantages of being secured to the pedals mean that if all you're doing is riding the bike, clipless is a very good way to go. The other advantage is wearing shoes specifically designed to support your feet and I believe this is a bigger advantage than the presence of clips be they toe clips or under your feet. Interestingly, the concept that stiff soled shoes are the best is also under fire now.

If you want to do some walking, SPDs or Crank Bros are a good way to go.

If you want to do a lot of walking and want/need to do it in your cycling shoes, it's toe clips or platforms - SPDs will do it for a while but there will come a time where they'll start to annoy you.

Now that I've got good cycling shos with flat soles (mine are Shimano bmx shoes as it happens), toe clips have proven to be the best option for me. But it really does come down to personal likes and lifestyles.

Richard
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 08:54 PM   #10
famelec
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 52
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My bike came with pedals similar to the Campus pedals at Performance Bike, and like them a lot. When I'm in stop and go areas I don't clip in. Otherwise I'm clipped in. I can walk into the office in the morning in shoes that are quite easy to walk in. And during weekends when I ride around the neighborhood I can hop on wearing regular sneakers. Can't beat this type of pedal!

Brian
famelec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 09:09 PM   #11
ghettocruiser
Former Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: dropmachine.com
Bikes:
Posts: 4,062
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I prefer double sided in traffic, but IMO it's not a big issue either way.
ghettocruiser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-08, 09:48 PM   #12
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
but IMO it's not a big issue either way.
Yup. It boils down to what you're doing, what you're trying to achieve and what irritates you.

Richard
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 10:08 AM   #13
Zdad
re-newbie
 
Zdad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Columbus OH
Bikes: Specialized Sequoia
Posts: 40
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What's your reason for wearing normal shoes occasionally? Walking? Not carrying/storing your work shoes? If it's for walking consider some of the MTB shoes that allow both like the Specialized Taho. I use those with Crank Bros Quattro SLs and works great for both riding and walking around.
Zdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 10:41 AM   #14
Celos 
Two Wheeled Maniac
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Fremont, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 69
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My commuter came with two-sided clipless Shimano SPDs, but one side had a plastic platform clipped into it, so you could wear regular shoes. While I was initially skeptical, they've been pretty good for casual rides to the store and around the neighborhood. They've also allowed me to use my bike to go from one building to another during the workday without worrying about wearing business shoes. This works better for me than toe cages, for example, as I wear dressy shoes and they'd be scuffed by the cages.

I wear SPD-equipped MTB shoes when riding the main commute, but it's nice to have the flexibility to wear regular shoes.

It all comes down to the type of riding you're going to be doing and what type of clothing/attire you need to be wearing at both ends.
Celos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 03:40 PM   #15
UprightJoe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have Shimano PDM324's on my commuter. Love them...
UprightJoe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 03:56 PM   #16
mechBgon
Senior Member
 
mechBgon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Bikes:
Posts: 6,957
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I prefer double-sided SPDs for immediate, I-have-15-cars-lined-up-behind-me-and-the-light-just-turned-green engagement. Since the OP asks specifically about moving out from stoplights, I suggest double-sided for him/her too.
mechBgon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 03:57 PM   #17
paulwwalters
beatz down lo|seatz up hi
 
paulwwalters's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Missouri, USA
Bikes: A 2007 Trek 4300. 22.5", 1981 Trek 610 24" (61cm)
Posts: 1,062
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Time ATAC!!!!
paulwwalters is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 05:19 PM   #18
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
I prefer double-sided SPDs for immediate, I-have-15-cars-lined-up-behind-me-and-the-light-just-turned-green engagement. Since the OP asks specifically about moving out from stoplights, I suggest double-sided for him/her too.
I've used both, had double sided on my fixed gear bike until recently. I understand where you're coming from but my experience has been that the double sided doesn't really offer anything. Partly because if you take your foot out of the clip at the same point each time (and the right point), single sided pedals will roll around with the clip under your foot anyway ... most times and partly because with something like the m324, it doesn't matter if it doesn't.

Richard
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 05:28 PM   #19
BarracksSi
Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped.
 
BarracksSi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes: Some bikes. Hell, they're all the same, ain't they?
Posts: 13,858
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Okay, hang on...

There are single-sided pedals that you'd see on road bikes -- Look Keo, SPD-SL, etc. There's really only one side to put your feet on regardless of what shoe you have.

There are pedals with a clip on one side and a platform on the other. Are these "double sided", or should they be called "dual purpose" instead?

The reason being, there are other pedals that have clips and platforms on both sides, like that Nashbar pedal linked above, or some Shimanos and all Crank Brothers pedals. There's no "wrong side", no reason to flip them. Those are what I'd call "double sided".

(add-on edit) Of course, there are also Crank Bros. Eggbeaters, which are basically "four-sided"..
BarracksSi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 05:40 PM   #20
Bat22
Didn't make it
 
Bat22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Weymouth, Mass.
Bikes:
Posts: 931
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
"Wellgo dual function with alloy cage." Description of the pedals that came
with the bike. The cleat side is not flat like the posted Nashbar pedal.
I gave them a chance and I got used to them..for now.
Bat22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 06:32 PM   #21
peterbennett9
Member
Thread Starter
 
peterbennett9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Bangor, Northern ireland
Bikes: Dolan Precursa, Cube Agree GTC Race, Charge Juicer, Dahon Speed Pro TT, Dahon Matrix, Specialized Sirrus
Posts: 42
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks for all your input, as to what il be doing off the bike walking wise - im a personal trainer so il be riding to the gym to train ppl, its about 10km each way to and from my house, i will have to make this journey a few times a day depending on how many spaces i have between client bookings, i may also have to travel to clients houses occasionally. I have a pannier rack installed and intend to get some panniers to cary my training equipment (resistance bands, boxing gloves etc) and also stuff for showering. however it would be nice to (if say for example im only traveling in for one client session lasting an hr) that i could just hop off the bike and go train them, i dont wanna be having 4 showers a day so i suppose i need to think long and hard about my clothing set up. Im lucky that i can arrive and be a bit sweaty without this being outa the norm in a gym. So these shoes you have mentioned that can be used to clip in but also walked in, they have recessed cleats yes? do you think they would be bearable walking around a gym all day? it would be one less thing to carry if i could leave my trainers at home and just use those. I dont like the idea of using my trainers on the bike with normal platform pedals all the time as we get a lot of rain here and they would soon start to stink! I wouldnt mind that much but i had them specially made for my feet which cost a bomb
peterbennett9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 06:44 PM   #22
BarracksSi
Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped.
 
BarracksSi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes: Some bikes. Hell, they're all the same, ain't they?
Posts: 13,858
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Umm, ehhhhh, it depends more on the shoe -- and if you change the insole, too -- whether they'd be comfortable all day. My Tahos, for example, are doable all day unless I'm on my feet a lot, then the stiff sole and lack of heel cushioning start to take their toll. And, if you need to walk where there's cracked pavement or gravel, you'll be pounding those cleats even though they're recessed.
BarracksSi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 07:24 PM   #23
europa
Grumpy Old Bugga
 
europa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Bikes: Europa, Hillbrick, Road Chief, Repco Superlite (Ol' Rusty)
Posts: 3,328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
And the cleats don't stay 'recessed' for long because the rubber sole wears away whereas the steel cleat doesn't - how much of an issue that is depends on how much walking you do and what you're walking one.

However, for your work, I'd buy a pair of cycling shoes and use them on the bike, then carry a pair of trainers for use in the gym. No, I'm not a huge fan of carrying stuff around that you shouldn't have to but in this case, I'd put your footwear in the same category as a pair of neat trousers for an office worker.

Richard
europa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 07:30 PM   #24
mike
Senior Member
 
mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Snowy midwest
Bikes:
Posts: 5,392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What a coincidence. I was just struggling with some single sided pedals today and wondered why in the hell anybody would make single sided pedals in the first place.

Absolutely get double sided pedals.

There doesn't seem to be a difference when the pedals are new and in great shape.

However, as the pedals wear and age, they don't balance like they do when they are new and you will be constantly toe-flipping your pedals to get the right side up.
mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-08, 07:32 PM   #25
MikeR
Very Senior Member
 
MikeR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Central Pa
Bikes: 2000 Bianchi San Remo and a mint 1984 Trek 720
Posts: 1,762
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bat22 View Post
i don't use cleats on a commute. The clip side (the heavier side ) is usually
facing down. I can tell when it isn't and just flip it with a flik of my ankle.
I've gotten so used to doing it that motion is allmost done subconsciously.
+1
__________________
It's better to cycle through life than to drive by it.
MikeR is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:13 AM.