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  1. #76
    Senior Member neilfein's Avatar
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    Dog tag Medic Alert.
    Tour Journals, Blog, ride pix

    I'm in the celtic folk fusion band Baroque and Hungry. "Mended", our new full-length studio album, is now available for download.

  2. #77
    Seņior Member ItsJustMe's Avatar
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    I certainly wouldn't worry about putting health insurance info on my tag. They'll get the info eventually. I just want to make sure I'm not a John Doe for hours until my wife starts calling ERs.
    Work: the 8 hours that separates bike rides.

  3. #78
    Senior Member Throwmeabone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimAgainSoon View Post
    After reading this thread, i just ordered two dog tags on chains from Boomerang (one for the bike, one for the boat).

    Thanks for the tip, no motor.
    I ordered one too.

  4. #79
    Senior Member SlimAgainSoon's Avatar
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    My Boomerang tags arrived yesterday -- Nice.

    Better quality than I expected -- these are not the old hammered out dog tags of GI fame.

    Clear text. Nice chain.

  5. #80
    triathlete? roadie? MTB? caelric's Avatar
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    I got my wife and I roadid anklets for Christmas. Name, three emergency contacts, NKA/O POS (me), O POS, Morphine Allergy (wife)

    Sure, they might not look, but I figure it's better to have it than not.

    As a US Marine, I also have a set of dogtags, but I hate wearing them because the chain gets caught in my chest hair....
    Go Fast By Any Means, my triathlon/motor sports blog

  6. #81
    Two H's!!! TWO!!!!! chephy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by InfiniteRegress View Post
    Actually, my mom could have provided information that was very important.
    Yep, that's why I said road IDs make sense for someone with medical issues.

    What if you have specific requests for situations where you're gravely injured? If you've opted to be an organ donor or opted not to have extensive measures taken to save your life in the event that you've suffered a serious brain injury, only family may be able to ensure that your wishes are carried out.
    Well, in the latter case, they'll always be able to pull the plug later. In the former, yes, contacting family members makes sense if this kind of thing is important to you and/or them. I don't really care, so I didn't think about it, but it's a valid point.

    In addition, a family member who is present immediately following a serious accident can help ensure that there are no medical mistakes and that you're properly cared for. Unfortunately, medical mistakes are more common than most people realize. Having a family member present as soon as you roll into the hospital who is there looking out for your interests has been shown to minimize such mistakes.
    I have a bit of a phobia of medical mistakes actually, but I am not sure how a family member can help avoid it, unless he/she is a trained medical professional AND is allowed to even be near the unconscious injured you or at least talk to doctors for more than 3 seconds.
    Stomping as lightly as I can...

  7. #82
    Bike Monkey XavierB's Avatar
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    I wear a dog tag (yes, a real bow wow dog tag) on a lanyard around my neck with my name, next of kin, insurance number and the name of the hospital I work at engraved on it. I keep it on a lanyard around my neck with my keys.

    The best deal on them can be had here. I got mine in red plastic. Less rattling.

    Yes, they are useful. ER nurses look for them on unconcious people brought in. Shoes tend to get thrown off in accidents or tossed in the corner of a trauma suite. Things around the neck are noticed. You want the ER staff to have the information. First responders typically cut off helmets, and sometimes leave them behind. I would avoid having the tag attached to a helmet.

    You can also place your next of kin's phone number in your cell phone under ICE, or In Case of Emergency. That is checked as well.
    Last edited by XavierB; 01-12-09 at 04:57 AM.

  8. #83
    Senior Member cyclezealot's Avatar
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    Mine is readily apparent on my helmet.. I have a medical ID notice on the exterior of the helmet; stating an id alert is pasted on the inside.
    Pray for the Dead and Fight like Hell for the Living






    ^ Since January 1, 2012

  9. #84
    Senior Member no motor?'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimAgainSoon View Post
    My Boomerang tags arrived yesterday -- Nice.

    Better quality than I expected -- these are not the old hammered out dog tags of GI fame.

    Clear text. Nice chain.
    Glad you liked them. I compared mine to the Road ID a friend had a liked the Boomerang tags better. Let's hope we never have to use them!

  10. #85
    Commuter JoeSoMD's Avatar
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    What a great advertising thread the RoadID folks have going on here!!!

    I got the RoadID bracelet, am pretty happy with it, but I am embarassed that I didn't think to put an "organ donor" statement on it. Nuts, that should have been a no-brainer.
    =======================================================
    From Miller in Repo Man: "the more you drive, the less intelligent you are."

  11. #86
    Infinite Regress InfiniteRegress's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chephy View Post
    I have a bit of a phobia of medical mistakes actually, but I am not sure how a family member can help avoid it, unless he/she is a trained medical professional AND is allowed to even be near the unconscious injured you or at least talk to doctors for more than 3 seconds.
    Even an untrained family member can help prevent medical mistakes. This can include reminding health care workers tending to you of any allergies (just because it's written down doesn't mean that they look at it), ensuring that medication dosages are administered as prescribed (which doesn't take a medical background, just a sharp eye), and reminding health care workers to do simple things like wash their hands before they come into your room. Many hospitals throughout the country now have very public campaigns that remind family members and patients to ask their physicians as soon as they enter the room to do anything if they've washed their hands. Sounds crazy, but the transmission of MRSA in many communities is rampant, and this is largely due to the lack of basic hand hygiene as recommended by the CDC. MRSA is one of the top causes of post-operative infection, and anyone can catch it.

    Even if you're crtically injured or just coming out of surgery, a family member is generally permitted to be present. Studies have shown that having a family member present does have a significant impact on preventing medical mistakes. Some evidence has shown that even just having a family member stand by your bedside can result in fewer medical mistakes because that watchful eye makes docs and nurses be more careful (i.e., because they know they're being watched). In addition, you would be surprised to learn how often in a hospital setting patients are left unattended, even in some critical situations or in situations where their condition wasn't thought to be critical but takes a bad turn quickly. This is one instance where having a family member present the minute you roll through the door can save your life. Unfortunately, many emergency rooms lack sufficient staff to properly supervise all patients. It's the reality of our health care system. Finally, when you're injured, you may not be in the best state of mind to ask all the right questions and remember information you're provided with during those few precious minutes with thew doc. Having someone there who is coherent and has a relatively clear head can be invaluable to making sure you get the proper treatment.

    The Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the American Hospital Association (AHA) have both made formal recommendations for patients to have family members or appointed advocates present whenever they are in the hospital in an effort to help reduce medical mistakes. I believe other health care advocacy organizations have come out with similar statements.

    Sorry to ramble on here, but I work in this field and have seen too many examples of all the negative things that can happen in the hospital environment due to blatant medical errors. Our current health care system is extremely overburdened right now, and this greatly attributes to the medical errors we see. I am sure the vast majority of you on here have not had extensive experience with hospitals - that's a good thing! But I just want to get this info out there because it could save a life!

  12. #87
    Seņior Member ItsJustMe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeSoMD View Post
    What a great advertising thread the RoadID folks have going on here!!!
    Heh, despite the fact that we're all saying to just go and buy pet tags for $4?

    I just went out to loveyourpets.com this morning in response to XavierB's post and grabbed 2 red plastic tags for me, one for my dog. $3.50 each and $2 flat shipping. It's got everything on it that my RoadID does - I just figure I'll put one in my shoelaces and one in my helmet or something, because I forget to wear my dog tag sometimes. No way would I go out and spend $25 on a RoadID again. I suppose if I had medical issues their online thing might be worth something, but I have zero issues, I just need ID and contact info.
    Work: the 8 hours that separates bike rides.

  13. #88
    Former Member
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    Supposedly.

    I think it's on my other pack in the basement.

  14. #89
    Freewheelin' Fred dwilbur3's Avatar
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    Got my Road ID today. A little piece of mind at an inflated price.

    I don't mind. It looks nice and it does what I need it to do.

    You bargain hunters can be proud to have done it for less, but it doesn't take away any of my enjoyment.

  15. #90
    Senior Member no motor?'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by InfiniteRegress View Post
    Even an untrained family member can help prevent medical mistakes. This can include reminding health care workers tending to you of any allergies (just because it's written down doesn't mean that they look at it), ensuring that medication dosages are administered as prescribed (which doesn't take a medical background, just a sharp eye), and reminding health care workers to do simple things like wash their hands before they come into your room. Many hospitals throughout the country now have very public campaigns that remind family members and patients to ask their physicians as soon as they enter the room to do anything if they've washed their hands. Sounds crazy, but the transmission of MRSA in many communities is rampant, and this is largely due to the lack of basic hand hygiene as recommended by the CDC. MRSA is one of the top causes of post-operative infection, and anyone can catch it.

    Even if you're crtically injured or just coming out of surgery, a family member is generally permitted to be present. Studies have shown that having a family member present does have a significant impact on preventing medical mistakes. Some evidence has shown that even just having a family member stand by your bedside can result in fewer medical mistakes because that watchful eye makes docs and nurses be more careful (i.e., because they know they're being watched). In addition, you would be surprised to learn how often in a hospital setting patients are left unattended, even in some critical situations or in situations where their condition wasn't thought to be critical but takes a bad turn quickly. This is one instance where having a family member present the minute you roll through the door can save your life. Unfortunately, many emergency rooms lack sufficient staff to properly supervise all patients. It's the reality of our health care system. Finally, when you're injured, you may not be in the best state of mind to ask all the right questions and remember information you're provided with during those few precious minutes with thew doc. Having someone there who is coherent and has a relatively clear head can be invaluable to making sure you get the proper treatment.

    The Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the American Hospital Association (AHA) have both made formal recommendations for patients to have family members or appointed advocates present whenever they are in the hospital in an effort to help reduce medical mistakes. I believe other health care advocacy organizations have come out with similar statements.

    Sorry to ramble on here, but I work in this field and have seen too many examples of all the negative things that can happen in the hospital environment due to blatant medical errors. Our current health care system is extremely overburdened right now, and this greatly attributes to the medical errors we see. I am sure the vast majority of you on here have not had extensive experience with hospitals - that's a good thing! But I just want to get this info out there because it could save a life!
    Well said. Conventional medicine is dangerous enough as it is without the mistakes - I want them to have as much correct information as I can if I'm ever in bad enough shape to need that kind of care.

  16. #91
    SSP
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlimAgainSoon View Post
    My Boomerang tags arrived yesterday -- Nice.

    Better quality than I expected -- these are not the old hammered out dog tags of GI fame.

    Clear text. Nice chain.
    +1. Mine came late last week.

    Very well made, and very legible.

    And unlike the more expensive Road ID, you can have it engraved on both sides. That allowed enough room for name and address, 4 emergency (ICE) phone numbers, "no medical allergies", plus my motto: "Work Hard, Play Harder!"
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  17. #92
    Pants are for suckaz HandsomeRyan's Avatar
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    I've been wearing a red ankle roadID for about a year now. I get a lot of questions about what it is (a lot of people ask if I'm diabetic or something).

    It gives me peace of mind and it's more comforable than dog tags. Give me a cool tan line too.

  18. #93
    Scan Me DallasSoxFan's Avatar
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    I've been meaning to do this for a while. I just placed an order for one of these:

    http://www.beststitch.com/index.php?...0f1ba3eb1b7b9c

    I measured it out and it should slide over my velcro straps on my cycling shoes. I'm also going to get a set of dog tags from somewhere else, but I won't forget it if its permanently attached to the shoes that I use for riding!

    These also look intriguing as ankle straps that could also be used to fasten pant leg bottoms:

    http://www.gotags.com/pet_tags_by_id/9

  19. #94
    gtd
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    It's not overpriced . . .

    Several people have said RoadID is over priced, but I disagree. It's not just a dog tag. The company also runs a web server and a telephone bank so first responders can get your detailed medical and emergency contact info instantly. The web is interactive so you can update your information as often as it might change. All these features come at a price.

    If you've got medical conditions -- bleeding disorder, drug allergies, etc. -- name, rank and serial number just isn't enough.

    I keep mine on the bike when I'm not riding, as a reminder to wear it. I wouldn't dream of riding these dangerous North Georgia roads without it.

  20. #95
    Seņior Member ItsJustMe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtd View Post
    Several people have said RoadID is over priced, but I disagree. It's not just a dog tag. The company also runs a web server and a telephone bank so first responders can get your detailed medical and emergency contact info instantly. The web is interactive so you can update your information as often as it might change. All these features come at a price.

    If you've got medical conditions -- bleeding disorder, drug allergies, etc. -- name, rank and serial number just isn't enough.

    I keep mine on the bike when I'm not riding, as a reminder to wear it. I wouldn't dream of riding these dangerous North Georgia roads without it.
    OK, but when I got my RoadID, there was no such service. And many people don't need any such service. I have no medical issues whatsoever, so there's not much for them to find out from any online service. And I'm not sure why having them contact RoadID to get my wife's phone number is better than me just printing my wife's phone number on the tag in the first place.

    Do most people have medical issues that are so severe that first responders have to know about them in the first hour of attention? Most meds wouldn't count. I'd think the number of people with issues like that would be in the minority.

    For me, RoadID is certainly vastly overpriced. I bought one, and still have it and use it, but I'm now supplementing it with $3.50 tags bought from loveyourpets.com and wouldn't bother with the RoadID again.
    Work: the 8 hours that separates bike rides.

  21. #96
    SSP
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    Quote Originally Posted by ItsJustMe View Post
    OK, but when I got my RoadID, there was no such service. And many people don't need any such service. I have no medical issues whatsoever, so there's not much for them to find out from any online service. And I'm not sure why having them contact RoadID to get my wife's phone number is better than me just printing my wife's phone number on the tag in the first place.

    Do most people have medical issues that are so severe that first responders have to know about them in the first hour of attention? Most meds wouldn't count. I'd think the number of people with issues like that would be in the minority.

    For me, RoadID is certainly vastly overpriced. I bought one, and still have it and use it, but I'm now supplementing it with $3.50 tags bought from loveyourpets.com and wouldn't bother with the RoadID again.
    +1. I got the boomerang tag recently. It's high quality, and allows for 5 lines of information to be printed on each side, at about half the cost of a RoadID (which can only be engraved on one side).
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  22. #97
    Two H's!!! TWO!!!!! chephy's Avatar
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    Interesting. Thanks for the informative post, InfiniteRegress.
    Stomping as lightly as I can...

  23. #98
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    Very good information here. Maybe its a good idea for me to hit armydogtags.com or another place that does this type of metal engraving/stamping and pick up a civilian set.

  24. #99
    SSP
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlts22 View Post
    Very good information here. Maybe its a good idea for me to hit armydogtags.com or another place that does this type of metal engraving/stamping and pick up a civilian set.
    Those are stamped. IMO, the laser engraving on the boomerang tags looks better and is more legible.
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  25. #100
    Junior Member JimmyJ's Avatar
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    Dog tags are on my list of 'things to buy.' I know I should get them sooner though - you never know when they will come in handy.
    Nothing beats a good scalp in a Silly Commuter Race!

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