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  1. #1
    Member
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    Shock-absorbing seatpost: any good?

    I'm thinking about installing one of those seatposts with built-in shock absorber on my commuter bike.

    Since I pretty much max out the tires to the pressure that's written on them (6 bar) I'd like not to crack my butt on every hole that's in the road.

    Any opinions or experience is welcome.

  2. #2
    Mr. Cellophane RainmanP's Avatar
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    My first commuter came with a suspension seatpost. As I started working more on developing a smooth fast pedal stroke I found the slight movement of the suspension objectionable so I locked it out. I couldn't detect any difference in comfort. If you are riding on road and experiencing some discomfort a suspension seatpost is probably not the answer.
    If it ain't broke, mess with it anyway!

  3. #3
    'possum killer chuckfox's Avatar
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    Apr 2004
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    Ames, Iowa
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    mountain bike (Litespeed Pisgah), touring bike (Giant Frankenbike), tandem (Burley Samba), fixie (Raleigh Rush Hour)
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    I try not to be negative...but I hated my suspension seat posts. I have had experience with two--both inexpensive models.

    The problems I had were similar to what RainmanP describes, bobbing of the seat when peddling and unpredictable saddle heights due to sqwish combined with sticktion. It also makes it difficult to set your seat height because it needs to start out too high and then squash down when you sit on it. I have also noticed that on one model that I had, the seat would rotate a bit side to side when peddling. I have never owned an expensive one--like a thudbuster. They may perform much better.

    I would invest the extra money you would spend on a suspension seatpost into a high quality saddle.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    The Brooks Conquest sprung saddle is fairly lightweight (compared to saddle+sus post) , designed for MTB use. It wont go all slack and wobbly after a year or two.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    I've been changing my mind about suspension seat post since at one time I was all for this device. I've changed my mind over the time and now think they do have a purpose on small wheel folding bikes where the ride is much rougher than a traditional size bike. I also think those that are using steel bikes don't really need one but I'm not so sure if you have an alu frame.

    Here's my advice.

    The best seat post suspension systems cost more than $100.00 USD. Too many people buy the cheap version and later hate the device having never used the more expensive model (Thudbuster). Rule of thumb, you get what you paid for.

    I also agree on the Brooks saddle alternative. The Champion flyer can change the feel of a Cannondale road bike it's that good! Yet, the Brooks saddle is also not a cheap alternative so pick your choice.

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