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Old 09-04-09, 08:45 AM   #1
DJFlowe
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Help selecting a jacket for this winter...

I need everyone's advice in choosing a jacket for this winter. It's so tough to tell online exactly what a jacket is, what the material's like, etc. So I'm hoping for some good experience from everyone on here... I'm tired of buying something just b/c it's on sale and realizing that it's not what I wanted once I get it.

I already have a good gore-tex shell that's served me well in the past. My commute is increasing to about 11 miles each way, and once it cools off I plan to do it in my work clothes, rather than changing every morning like I do now.

Also, you'll probably want to know that the temp in NC during the winter is probably around 25-35 degrees at night and 40's during the day. None of that Minnesota craziness here.

So here's what I'm looking for... something warm and windproof, that's slightly water repellent (able to handle a misty damp morning but not really up to a full-on rain), that isn't so technical it looks goofy with khakis or jeans off the bike, and isn't so warm that I sweat to death wearing it. I have in mind something like the windproof Patagonia slick-surfaced fleece jackets, but specific to biking. That is, assuming there is such a thing.

I had my eye on the Showers Pass Hybrid Jacket, or maybe the Illuminite Shark Windguard. But it's impossible to tell how heavy or light those jackets are... I don't need a glorified shell/windbreaker. I'm thinking the Illuminite looks more like a shell than a fleece.

Any recommendations or am I looking for the impossible?
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Old 09-04-09, 08:54 AM   #2
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I used a Century II jacket from Performance last year, and was pretty happy with it.



It's very thin. It rolls up to about the size of a softball, maybe a little smaller. It was easily warm enough for me, and our winter temps are about like yours. It's available in blue if you don't like the low invisibility yellow. They claim it's "water resistant" though I honestly can't remember how it did in that regard. That probably means it did OK.
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Old 09-04-09, 09:00 AM   #3
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Marmot driclime windshirt.

The fleece is very light, its very windproof, the pits are vented, and it packs tiny and looks good.

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Old 09-04-09, 09:10 AM   #4
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REI ultralight W/B is a good choice even though its not cycle specific.
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Old 09-04-09, 09:21 AM   #5
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Mountain Hardwear Windstopper Tech Jacket. I got one the first year they were released and have worn it for years now as my winter riding jacket. I want to say this winter will be year 6 or 7, but not 100% sure. Has pit zips which keeps you cool when riding, and is not stupid heavy/bulky. Works great for keeping the wind out and you warm. Very easy to layer things under or over. I even wrecked while riding it which tore a huge hole in its shoulder, sent it back to Mountain Hardwear and they did the repair work. Had to pay $40 for shipping and material and that was it. I highly recommend this jacket and will be buying another one when this one dies, but I don't see that happening anytime soon.




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Old 09-04-09, 09:46 AM   #6
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I used a GoLite Phantasm jacket made with GoreTex PacLite all of last winter. Worked great. It's easy to layer under it and it's very wind/waterproof. I rode with the jacket in temps down to -10 and up to 45 with comfort and correct layering.
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Old 09-04-09, 10:06 AM   #7
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If you already have a Gore-Tex jacket, you might want to use that and dial in the comfort by adding thin layers underneath.
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Old 09-04-09, 10:19 AM   #8
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I love my Patagonia Wind Shield jacket. Awesome for winter cycling. Reallly cuts down on bulkiness, I can wear less layers underneath it's so warm. Windproof/weatherproof front, breathable everywhere else. Works great for XC skiing and winter running too! The new version is here.
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Old 09-04-09, 01:09 PM   #9
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I found an off brand soft-shell jacket in a sporting goods store, then snagged a Columbia soft shell jacket on steep discount last spring. They are designed for skiing, I believe, but also make great cycling jackets for cold weather. I ride down to zero degrees farenheight in them, and cross country ski in them.

Its ok to have a collection of windproof/waterproof outer garments that you can layer underneath. Find something that fills a niche your gortex shell does not for added diversity.
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Old 09-04-09, 01:10 PM   #10
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The unique thing about cycling that is often ignored is that the wind is always from the front, so you can put wind-blocking fabric on the front only and the back can disperse vapor. This prevents the steam-bath effect.

I would highly recommend the Kucharik wind-front wool jacket. I wear it all winter here in knoxville. With appropriate layers, it is good from about 50F down to under 20F. Not too geeky for full-time casual wear, and also works fine on long winter rides in bike duds.
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Old 09-04-09, 01:40 PM   #11
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I'm originally from Charlotte, NC. What worked for me when I rode a lot there:
  • A cycling-specific poly shell, that fits loose enough to wear thermal underwear or a light-weight poly pile jacket under it. Something like a PI Zephyr jacket, or Performance
    Century shell. You don't have to get an expensive one with all the bells and whistles, and you won't get as sweaty in them as you do in the versions with goretex outer fabric.
  • A regular gore-tex parka shell for rain and below freezing weather. This should be large enough to wear sweaters and such under it. For a while, I also had good luck with a much cheaper rain jacket (PVC lined nylon shell). I sweated more in the pvc jacket than in the gore-tex, but it kept me warm and did not let cold rain soak me down.
  • Long-sleeve poly shirts, and synthetic thermal underwear. They are light, and just take one off when you get hot. I mostly wore them during morning rides. The shell was all that I needed down to about 35F.
  • A couple of pairs of regular-weight tights without a pad (keep one pair clean and dry, so that you can switch after riding in the rain). Even if you wear non-cycling clothes over them, these will really save you a lot of discomfort. With these, you can stay pretty comfortable in most cool-wet drizzle weather conditions without having to wear rain pants.
  • A pair of gore-tex cycling rain pants. You can get cheaper stuff, but if you are like me, the cheaper rain pants tear up too fast. I would just go for loose-fitting rain pants. Big enough to wear tights and/or fleece workout pants underneath.
  • Larger-sized, synthetic fabric, knitted stocking caps. The kind you get at WalMart do just fine. You wear them under your helmet on colder days.
  • Either a couple of plastic grocery bags, or a gore-tex helmet cover, for when it is really raining and is below 35 F.
  • Cold-weather and rain gloves. Lots of options here. These days, I prefer regular fleece polyester pile ski-type gloves (sometimes wear 2 pairs), and a pair of rain-proof nylon/poly shell-only lobster-type gloves. With a couple of pairs of fleece gloves under my handsweats, I can ride pretty comfortably down to about 10 F.
  • Booties. I preferred the basic nylon shell type, when I lived there. Cold rain is your biggest enemy, and neoprene gets too heavy and soggy in those conditions.

Pretty big list, now that I look at it. I would start with the shell, gloves, and tights, and accumulate the rest as it gets colder.


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Old 09-04-09, 01:44 PM   #12
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Make sure the jacket has zippers in the arm pits and a pocket for your keys.
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Old 09-04-09, 02:21 PM   #13
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I do bike in the Minnesota crazy range, But in your temp range I go with a soft shell, that has a windstopper front. Great temp regulation and breathability, far better than hard shells, decent water resistance, and plenty of temp range with layers. I'd recommend one cut for cycling or hiking with a longer tail and longer sleeves. Some of the casual soft shells are too short in both areas. Sorry I don't have a specific model to recommend, I have two, a Craft, and Ibex. Both are great.
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Old 09-04-09, 02:49 PM   #14
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You might want to consider picking up a nice merino wool sweater. Around 40F, I'll wear one over a base layer and I'm good to go. I personally find anything that is "windproof" makes me a sweaty mess above 30F or so. Below 30F, I'll usually switch to my Gore jacket and if it really starts getting cold, I'll add the sweater back in under the jacket. Super versatile. Got mine from Earth, Wind, and Rider and, while it was slightly pricey, it is hands-down the best piece of cycling clothing I've purchased. And they don't smell!
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Old 09-04-09, 03:27 PM   #15
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Layers are going to be good with whatever you end up going with. Flexibility is really nice in the colder weather, especially when you figure in the wind, rain and snow that have a much bigger effect than you might think at first. Some of us like lots of layers in the cold, and find it's more comfortable than one thick layer. You'll get extra practice with doing laundry too.
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Old 09-04-09, 04:07 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Sluggo View Post
The unique thing about cycling that is often ignored is that the wind is always from the front, so you can put wind-blocking fabric on the front only and the back can disperse vapor. This prevents the steam-bath effect.
I can't tell if you are lucky enough to cycle somewhere that NEVER has any wind, or if you have had some sort of cycling curse placed upon you so that you must forever fight a headwind. But for me, cross winds, head winds, and tail winds, often faster than I can ride, occur regularly enough so that I can feel the wind on any body surface on any given day.
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Old 09-04-09, 05:42 PM   #17
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I usually layer my clothing. At those tempratures I wear an A-shirt, a cut-off tee, a long sleeve merino wool base, and a hooded sweatshirt. If its raining or wet snow I'll put on a cheap Field & Stream rain jacket or light wind breaker over it. It works for me and my commute. I've tried some cycling specific jackets before, but my dimensions and choice of clothing don't go well with it.
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Old 09-04-09, 05:49 PM   #18
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This time of year the Salvation Army stores or whatever thrift stores are in you area should be chock full of stuff and at a lot less than you will pay anywhere else unless you get it for free. I found two merino wool base layers two years ago 50% off the sale price. I ended up paying a dollar for the two of them. You wouldn't believe the nice stuff people get rid of. Well now that the economy sucks maybe not so much but keep your eyes open and you can get some great deals.
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Old 09-04-09, 09:43 PM   #19
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My jacket of choice for winter riding is the Pearl Izumi Barrier Jacket. Pricey, but worth it. I got an old stock closeout in x-large for 80.00US and there's plenty of room for layers. It's got pit zips, pockets, etc. Went thriftin' and found some close knit cashmere/100% wool blends for 3.00US per. I bought 5. They're great. For a 1st layer I've got an old Lemond hooded jersey w/thumb holes and a couple from Performance. Use a balaclava for REAL cold days and a pair of Craft winter cycling tights, too. I'm in middle Tennessee, so the temps are similar to where you live. Gore-Tex Gloves, wool socks, Lake Winter road shoes( a size larger than normal) and a helmet cover are good for 2-3 hours @ 0-20/25F w/toe warmers.
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Old 09-04-09, 10:30 PM   #20
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Also, you'll probably want to know that the temp in NC during the winter is probably around 25-35 degrees at night and 40's during the day. None of that Minnesota craziness here
Don't overthink it. The jackets people have posted here are great I'm sure but I commuted through the winter here in Ohio with my work clothes and a fleece down to about 15F. Below 15F (or in the rain), I would wear a cheapo breathable rain jacket over the fleece. I also altered my headwear / gloves / footwear somewhere around 15-20F. Nothing I wore was cycling specific and I was not usually uncomfortable. Honestly, my worst rides last winter were where I overdressed... That's the worst.

The key is to keep riding so that you get used to the colder weather and adapt. You probably already own adequate clothing. Just tweak what you're wearing as needed.

Of course, if you're dying to spend some money on a new jacket there's nothing wrong with that either
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Old 09-07-09, 01:04 PM   #21
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Don't overthink it. The jackets people have posted here are great I'm sure but I commuted through the winter here in Ohio with my work clothes and a fleece down to about 15F. Below 15F (or in the rain), I would wear a cheapo breathable rain jacket over the fleece. I also altered my headwear / gloves / footwear somewhere around 15-20F. Nothing I wore was cycling specific and I was not usually uncomfortable. Honestly, my worst rides last winter were where I overdressed... That's the worst.

The key is to keep riding so that you get used to the colder weather and adapt. You probably already own adequate clothing. Just tweak what you're wearing as needed.

Of course, if you're dying to spend some money on a new jacket there's nothing wrong with that either
+1. I got a nice sporty looking windbreaker from walmart, I wear a hooded fleece sweatshirt under it and full fingered gloves. The jacket protects from mist and light rains and I'm usually sweating in 38 to 40 degree temps.
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Old 09-08-09, 11:54 AM   #22
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Foxwear:
I'm out of Maryland and did very well last year with a Foxwear E Vap. I used this jacket all through the winter, sometimes with a light wool sweater(3F one morning). It is 97% wind proof, rain resistant(not proof) and breathes better than ANY jacket I have ever used. Here's his link
http://www.foxwear.net/products_jackets.html

These are made to fit you by a guy in Idaho for UNDER $100.00. He uses different type materials to block wind(front) and vent(under arms and back). You can ask for any type combination from his material section. Custom fit, custom designed for under 100, can't beat it. Charlie

edit: This is a softshell which(IMHO) is the best type jacket for winter riding. Hardshells make you sweat.
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Old 09-09-09, 08:28 AM   #23
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This time of year the Salvation Army stores or whatever thrift stores are in you area should be chock full of stuff and at a lot less than you will pay anywhere else unless you get it for free.
+1

All my thin wool sweaters for layering are from the Goodwill store. They're usually in the $3-5 range.
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Old 09-10-09, 01:42 AM   #24
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If you want something that looks like a fleece, any of the "Windstopper" stuff would likely do the trick, in addition to the other stuff mentioned. If you can find stuff that's only Windstopper in the front, or has pit zips and stuff even better.

I personally wear the Shower's Pass Elite 2.0 jacket for pretty much all my biking below 50 degrees (it's ok up to 60 degrees, but it's so windproof it's to warm after that). It's very, very windproof. In red, in the right size, I thought it was more than just "not goofy looking" - I thought it looked good. Sharp. Nice. It does look like a really nice looking rain jacket, though, so it might not work if you really, really want that "fleecy" look. In a size to large that I have to wear to get the torso length right it just looks "plain". Probably not what you're looking for, just thought I'd mention it - it looks fine off the the bike with jeans, I wouldn't wear something goofy looking, but I like the freedom of not having to worry about rain at all at those lower temps.
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Old 09-10-09, 06:09 AM   #25
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I live in NC and ride year round. Here is what has worked for me:
- Base layers. Thin wicking t-shirts, short and long-sleeve. The one's at Target only cost about $10 and work just about as well as anything, but for really cold days I've got some Craft shirts.
- Long-sleeve jerseys. I've got several in a range of weights but the ones with brushed inner fabric are warmest. Buy what fits, don't worry about the brand names.
- Vest. A vest is one of the most useful clothing items here in fall, winter and spring. I often wear my vest to work in morning, and carry it home in the afternoon in my pack. Mine is a Pearl Izumi but I'm sure other brands work just as well. I would recommend something bright however, like neon green.
- Soft-shell jacket. I held off buying a cycling jacket for a long time on the theory that layering works best. Layering is great, but some of the soft-shell jackets really are superior on cold days. I've tried several but my Pearl Izumi Gavia gets the most use because it fits me well, is very breathable and comfortable in a range of temps, and it's moderately water repellent. It also is very bright (screaming yellow), which I like for commuting.
- Rain jacket. I have had zero luck with rain jackets but will probably keep trying. I've never found a rain jacket that breathes enough to make it worthwhile. Although they keep out rain, they make you sweat so much that you might as well be riding without a jacket. I am tempted to try a Showers Pass Double Century because it is light enough to pack small and only use when needed. Everyone raves about the Elite, but it seems like overkill for NC since we don't get much extended rainy weather.
- Feet. Wool socks and toe covers on my shoes.
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