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  1. #1
    Junior Member bmwrider's Avatar
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    advice for newbie on flat bar bike

    I have looked at the cannondale badboy disk, marin muirwoods, scott sportster p1 for a 10 mile ride one way to work, so far I know there is a big price difference here just trying to show the catagory I'm intrested in, I'm new and only been ridding for a month I don't know what else is out or what else to consider please help with this overly common problem.
    Last edited by bmwrider; 09-20-09 at 02:24 PM.

  2. #2
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    I'm not familiar with those yuo've listed, I've seen them talked about though. the difference between any two bikes may or may not be realized early on. Sure, I could say test ride but that would show you the fit and more basic feel of the bike. I presume that you've these two available locally, that's a start. Just to name two more ; Jamis & Bianchi. I'm not sure if you have 'em nearby but I suggest that you check their sites. Jamis is a very easy, informative site and has features you have listed, disc for example. Bianchi seems to be not listing the 2010 model types you're focusing on at this time so view their 2009 models. I've riden a couple few moedels in both brands and like them. I'm not selling them as such but the sites are informative.

  3. #3
    Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped. BarracksSi's Avatar
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    You're in that spot where you don't know enough to make a specific decision -- but from another perspective, you don't know so much that making the same decision means finding that one bike with very specific features. You've got it pretty easy, actually.

    First, think of yourself, not the bike. Where do you ride, what do you need to carry, how will you carry it, etc.

    Then figure out what you'd want on a bike -- rack w/ pannier bags, fenders, or clean and accessory-free, etc.

    Then choose a bike. There will be plenty of bikes out there that will fulfill most riders' requests.

    The difference in price for bikes like this mainly comes from wheels and components. At around $1000, like the Bad Boy Disc, you'll get something that'll work fine.

    I'd say to just pick whatever color and style you like. You're not doing time trials, racing up mountain stages, hucking off of rooftops, or touring across China, so you don't need anything special.

  4. #4
    TJx
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    Have a look at the Trek Valencia

    http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...ncia/valencia/

    Trek has 2 different prices, one they post on the internet and the retail you pay at your dealer, in May mine was $679.
    Solid bike for the money, good componets.
    I've been commuting 10 miles each way on mine since I bought it in May.

  5. #5
    Come here often? <wink> exile's Avatar
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    For a 10 mile commute I would start looking at road bikes. All the bikes you listed are flat bars. I think the multiple hand positions among other things would do better for your commute. Why are you looking at those particular models, is it a style thing?

    What are you currently riding and what's wrong with what you have? Is it slow, uncomfortable, in need of repairs, unable to carry things, etc.? Then ask if you have done things to make the ride more of whatever you feel is missing (i.e. added racks, tried different grips, tires, saddle, fixed it, etc.). Then make a list of what you want out of your new bike (i.e. faster, able to handle racks and fenders, lighter, more comfortable, more agile, etc.). From that point I think you would have a better idea of what you want and gain greater help from the forums. You could also ask the forum or use the search function describing what you are experiencing while riding (I ride a mile and my knee hurts, or the chain skips cogs, or i'm slow, or I have back pain while riding, or hand numbness, etc.).

    Basically get some miles and time in the saddle first before deciding to buy a new bike. Atleast that's my suggestion.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member cycle16v's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by exile View Post
    For a 10 mile commute I would start looking at road bikes. All the bikes you listed are flat bars. I think the multiple hand positions among other things would do better for your commute. Why are you looking at those particular models, is it a style thing?

    What are you currently riding and what's wrong with what you have? Is it slow, uncomfortable, in need of repairs, unable to carry things, etc.? Then ask if you have done things to make the ride more of whatever you feel is missing (i.e. added racks, tried different grips, tires, saddle, fixed it, etc.). Then make a list of what you want out of your new bike (i.e. faster, able to handle racks and fenders, lighter, more comfortable, more agile, etc.). From that point I think you would have a better idea of what you want and gain greater help from the forums. You could also ask the forum or use the search function describing what you are experiencing while riding (I ride a mile and my knee hurts, or the chain skips cogs, or i'm slow, or I have back pain while riding, or hand numbness, etc.).

    Basically get some miles and time in the saddle first before deciding to buy a new bike. Atleast that's my suggestion.
    It took me about two years on my MTB/Commuter with slicks to figure out what I needed for my 15 mile commute to and from work. I can't see doing the same commute with out my Specialized Tricross, fenders, 700x32 tires, Trek MTX Trunk bag and rack, lights, etc. Agree with you- maybe more time on his existing bike will let him know what he need for his commute.
    Last edited by cycle16v; 09-20-09 at 05:36 PM.

  7. #7
    on your left.
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    Scott SUB 30 FTW. it's excessively versatile, I love mine. currently it's set up as a pretty road-ish hybrid. I keep up on the group rides, and can commute too!
    Quote Originally Posted by caloso View Post
    I learned this the hard way. They say that experience is the best teacher, but I would have been preferred to just read about it on the internet.

  8. #8
    Bike ≠ Car ≠ Ped. BarracksSi's Avatar
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    Just go for the gusto -- Orbea Carpe Diem:
    http://www.orbea.com/en/bicis/modelo.../presentacion/

    Carbon monocoque frame, Alfine drivetrain and disc brakes, and it's even got rack (and possibly fender) mounts. One of the local shops had one the last time I went there, and I gotta admit, it's HOT... although I'd be worried about it getting gouged up anywhere I lock it.

  9. #9
    Senior Member meanwhile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwrider View Post
    I have looked at the cannondale badboy disk, marin muirwoods, scott sportster p1 for a 10 mile ride one way to work, so far I know there is a big price difference here just trying to show the catagory I'm intrested in, I'm new and only been ridding for a month I don't know what else is out or what else to consider please help with this overly common problem.
    Keep the bike simple. Avoid suspension forks; avoid carbon fibre in anything except perhaps the fork. Make sure that the bike can take at least 38mm wide tyres *and* fenders.

    If you want to try a drop bar bike as well - after all why not? - then try to find a cyclocross bike to test ride - much faster than a hybrid, powerful mountain bike brakes, tyres that eat pot holes instead of the other way around.

  10. #10
    Junior Member bmwrider's Avatar
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    I'm ridding a novara forza that is too short on the top tube for me I keep pushing my self off the seat, my coworker is the shop tech at the store and agrees its too short I'm not sure what I want yet just trying to figure it out

  11. #11
    Come here often? <wink> exile's Avatar
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    It sounds like all you need is a bike that fits bmwrider. I suggest looking used at first and then deciding what you need. Hopefully your friend at the bike shop can help you out.

    Good luck to you.
    lil brown bat wrote:
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  12. #12
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    Also consider the Giant FCR3. I do a 18 mile round trip commute on one, going on 5 years. But yes, the flat bar is hard on my hands and wrists. I added bar ends and that did help. You should try a road bike with drops before deciding.

  13. #13
    Senior Member squirtdad's Avatar
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    Disclaimer: I am predjudiced by my experience, with "flat bars" and each experience will very. For me, flat bars cause pain, fast.

    First for a 20 mile round trip, consider other bars that flat. At a minimum, plan and budget for good bar ends like the Ergon or cane creek ergo.... you have to have a position other than flat.

    Classic road bars give a variey of positions...and you can add the interupter brakes for when you are using them like flat bars.

    Look at bike handle bars over the history of bikes and while there are a million differnent shapes and swoops you only see flat bars as part of mountain biking.
    '82 Nishiski commuter/utility
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    '78 Univega gran turismo (son's Fixie/SS)
    06 Haro x3 (son's bmx)
    Electra cruiser (wife's bike)

    looking for: De Rosa 58cm ELOS frame and fork internal cable routing

  14. #14
    Junior Member bmwrider's Avatar
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    Oh yeah I will be using barends my forza has them, I think that drop bars lowest position is too low for me I like the bars I have now, I have tried a few drop bars for small test rides and the lower position seems very hard to be comfortable in and my barend are pretty close to using the hoods on drop bars I figure if I'm not gonna like to lowers why have them, mabe I would like them on the right bike but so far nothing has felt good to me with drops but I'm new to this, everyone says there are so many positions on drops but everyone I see using them only rides on the hoods, I spend most of my time on the barends

  15. #15
    Come here often? <wink> exile's Avatar
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    I'm relatively new to the drop bar thing myself. After a while I think you would get used to them, but of course the bike has to fit right to begin with. I ride mostly on the hoods and also on the bars. I rarely use the drops except when a wind has picked up or something. Proper fit is the key. You have to be comfortable on the bike, though that does not necessarily mean at every position. Take some time to be fitted by a shop and give yourself some time to get used to it.
    lil brown bat wrote:
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